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San Carlos Apache Fiddler LectureSan Carlos Apache Fiddler Lecture<div class="ExternalClass1F44BD60E0304C419FD960155A85272D"><p>​Join Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary and speaker Anthony Belvado for his presentaion on Apache Fiddle Making on May 2 at 6:30 p.m. at Pueblo Grande Museum.</p><p>Anthony has been making fiddles for about 40 years, getting his start after high school. A postcard image of a long-haired Apache man holding the instrument in a 19th-century photo studio piqued his interest. He went to his grandfather, Salton Reede Sr., who he knew made such fiddles, and asked him about it. A tutorship grew from there, with his grandfather guiding him through the making of the instrument.</p><p>Belvado makes his fiddles from agave, using the base of the woody stalk for larger versions of the fiddle, with the narrower portions converted to more traditional-sized models. Other fiddle-makers have used aspen or walnut, but he goes for materials that grow nearby. It takes him about an hour and a half to hollow out an agave that is split in half, with the sides then rejoined for the fiddle, he said. When he tried hollowing out a stalk without splitting it, he said, it took him about two weeks.</p><p>This event is free and open to the public, made possible by the Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary. Donations are welcome.</p></div>5/3/2018 1:30:00 AM5/3/2018 3:00:00 AMPueblo Grande Museum602-495-0901Pueblo Grande Museum - 4619 E Washington St ​Join Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary and speaker Anthony Belvado for his presentaion on Apache Fiddle Making on May 2 at 630 p.m. at Pueblo Grande Museum. Anthony has been making fiddles for about 40 years, getting his start after high school. A postcard image of a long-haired Apache man holding the instrument in a 19th-century photo studio piqued his interest. He went to his grandfather, Salton Reede Sr., who he knew made such fiddles, and asked him about it. A tutorship grew from there, with his grandfather guiding him through the making of the instrument. Belvado makes his fiddles from agave, using the base of the woody stalk for larger versions of the fiddle, with the narrower portions converted to more traditional-sized models. Other fiddle-makers have used aspen or walnut, but he goes for materials that grow nearby. It takes him about an hour and a half to hollow out an agave that is split in half, with the sides then rejoined for the fiddle, he said. When he tried hollowing out a stalk without splitting it, he said, it took him about two weeks. This event is free and open to the public, made possible by the Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary. Donations are welcome.