Fire Prevention​​



​Mission Statem​​ent

The Fire Prevention Division will provide a high level of life safety and property protection for the community and first responders through inspection, education and enforcement.​​


Jack Ballentine, Fire MarshalFire Prevention is the inspection, education and enforcement division of the fire department providing life safety services through code enforcement and inspections during the new business development process, general fire inspections, operating and special use permitting and complaint investigation.

Fire Prevention is the key to saving lives and property. Fire Prevention education is the first step in the Fire Department's commitment to protecting the lives and property of our citizens, guests and neighboring communities. 


​​The Phoenix Fire Department's Fire Prevention Division is committed to providing you the most comprehensive information and assistance possible. This site will guide you to timely safety information, permit applications, inspections, forms and publications.  If you  have questions, please click​ here for our contact information.​

​​      ​Fire Marshal Jack Ballentine

2015 Fire Prevention Week​​


Hear the Beep Where You Sleep. Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm!


Location matters when it comes to your smoke alarm. That's the message behind this year's Fire Prevention Week campaign, "Hear the Beep Where You Sleep. Every Bedroom Needs a Working Smoke Alarm!"

Along with firefighters, Fire Inspectors and safety advocates nationwide, the Phoenix Fire Department is joining forces with the nonprofit National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) during Fire Prevention Week, October 4-10, to remind local residents about the importance of having working smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each sleeping area, and on every level of the home, including the basement.

"In a fire, seconds count," said Phoenix Fire Chief Kara Kalkbrenner, "half of home fire deaths result from fires reported at night between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. when most people are asleep. Home smoke alarms can alert people to a fire before it spreads, giving everyone enough time to get out."

Per Phoenix Fire Inspector Brian Scholl, "according to the latest NFPA research, working smoke alarms cut the chance of dying in a fire in half.  Meanwhile, three out of five fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms."

This year's Fire Prevention Week campaign includes the following smoke alarm messages:


  1. Install smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each separate sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement.
  2. Interconnect all smoke alarms throughout the home. This way, when one sounds, they all do.
  3. Test alarms at least monthly by pushing the test button.
  4. Replace all smoke alarms when they are 10 years old or sooner if they don't respond properly. Where smoke alarms are permitted to be solely battery operated, they shall be replaced with a UL listed smoke alarm with sealed 10-year lithium battery. 
  5. Make sure everyone in the home knows the sound of the smoke alarm and understands what to do when they hear it.
  6. If the smoke alarm sounds, get outside and stay outside. Go to your outside meeting place.
  7. Call the fire department from outside the home.
Click here for the Hear the Beep Where you Sleep​ informational flyer. 

fireworks 2.jpg



The use of permissible fireworks in the State of Arizona and the City of Phoenix starts June 24 through July 6.  Permissible fireworks include: cylindrical and cone fountains, illuminating torches, wheels, ground spinners, flitter sparklers, ground sparkling devices. Click Here for a chart that will help you to determine if a product is legal or illegal to use in the City of Phoenix.   The law does not apply to novelty items such as snappers, snap caps, glow worms, snakes, party poppers, tot smoke devices or sparklers.  A good rule of thumb is: 

 If it launches into the air or explodes, it's illegal.  

​​​The sale of permissible fireworks in the State of Arizona and the City of Phoenix starts on May 20 and runs through July 6.  

Permissible fireworks for sale under state law may not be sold to person(s) under the age of 16. The penalty for selling, buying or using fireworks outside the permissible dates is a fine of $1,000. Use of fireworks on preservation land owned by the City of Phoenix is prohibited and is a Class 1 Misdemeanor with a $1,000 fine

The sale of permissible consumer fireworks in temporary tents over 800 square feet or canopies over 1200 square feet requires a Fire Prevention  permit. Per State law, signage is required at places of sale and display that advises purchases of permissible consumer fireworks is prohibited to persons under the age of 16. Additional permits and zoning approval may be required by the Planning & Development Department Zoning Division

Fire Department personnel will accept permissible and illegal fireworks that are voluntarily turned over at fire station locations. To report the use of illegal fireworks, contact the Phoenix Police Department @ 602-262-6262.

If you have questions, please click here for more information on fireworks or you can contact our Fire Prevention Offices at 602-262-6771, Monday - Friday 8am- 5pm. For afterhours questions, please call the Phoenix Fire Department Non-Emergency Line at 602-495-5555.​


Swimming Pool Barriers


A proper swimming pool barrier is a key component in pool safety.   In Arizona, drowning is the leading cause of death in and around the home for children under 5 years old.  Many of these deaths result when young children gain unsupervised access to swimming pools due to inadequate pool fencing.​  The City of Phoenix requires pools to have an approved fence around them to prevent a child from drowning.  Please click on the link below for more information​ on City of Phoenix Fire and Building Codes related to pool barriers: 

Pool Barrier Requirement  

​Did you know that you can contact the Fire Department to report a pool that is accessible due to a fence being down or a gate not functioning properly?  You can contact the Phoenix Fire Department Fire Prevention Division at 602-262-6771 to report an accessible pool during normal business hours or you can call 602-495-5555 to report an accessible pool outside normal business hours.   ​A Fire Inspector will respond to secure the pool. 

​​Carbon Dioxide Beverage Systems

After a carbon dioxide incident almost turned tragic in Phoenix, and on a national level has taken lives, the Phoenix Fire Department has initiated a comprehensive program to ensure compressed and liquefied based Carbonated Beverage Systems are designed, installed, and operated in accordance with all applicable codes and safety standards.​  As the uses and systems of Carbon Dioxide change, so does the Phoenix Fire Code to ensure safety.  Recently, a new Phoenix Fire Code Regulation went into effect regarding the venting of the beverage pumps.  All beverage pumps need to terminate their vents outside in accordance with this regulation.  Please click on the link below to read the new regulation as well as the link to our Carbon Dioxide Beverage Systems Information and Resource page.

Regulation 5307.4.1 Compressed Gas Venting

Carbon Dioxide Beverage Systems 


​Mobile Food Vehicles (Food Trucks)

​If you operate a Mobile Food Vehicle in the City of Phoenix, are you aware that Fire Department will inspect your Mobile Food Vehicle at all permitted outdoor events?  The Fire Department works in conjunction with Maricopa County Environmental Services to ensure these vehicles are safe.  The Phoenix Fire Code has requirements regarding hood systems, fire extinguishers and propane while Maricopa County Environmental Services issues a permit to each Mobile Food Vehicle operating within Maricopa County.  Please click here​ for more information on the Fire Code requirements for Mobile Food Vehicles and please visit www.maricopa.gov/EnvSvc​ for details on their permitting process.


Medical Gas Systems

​​​​Medical Gas Systems are commonly installed in Doctor and Dentist offices but many installers don't realize these systems require permits from the Fire Department to install them. Plans to install Medical Gas Systems need to be submitted to Fire Prevention at 150 S 12th Street. ​Please call Fire Inspector Brian Scholl at 602-319-2297 with any questions regarding Medical Gas Systems.  Here is the fire code summary for more information:  Medical Gas Systems​​



Fire Prevention Public Information Officer Safety Tips

Home Escape Plans​

2015 is here and the start of the new year is a great time to create and practice your home escape plan. This plan should include a map of your home showing all the doors and windows.  You need to know at least two ways out of your house in case your normal escape route is blocked.  You need to have an outside meeting place that's a safe distance from the house where everyone will meet ​so you can make sure everyone got out of the house safely. Finally...practice, practice, practice.  You need to practice your evacuation at least twice a year.  Please call Fire Prevention at 602-262-6771 for assistance in creating a Home Escape Plan.  Here are some more tips on Home Escape Plans:  Home Escape Plans​


Heating Safety

​​​In the Sonoran Desert, winter temperatures can become extremely cold.  Space heaters and other heating appliances are a leading cause of fires in the home.  Be safe this winter and follow these safety tips from the NFPA: Winter Heating Safety


Carbon​ Monoxide Safety

​Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless and an odorless gas that can make a person feel sick and can be deadly. In the home, heating  and cooking devices that burn fuel can be sources of carbon monoxide.​  The Phoenix Fire Code requires CO Detectors in homes with fuel burning appliances or with attached garages.  Click on the link below to learn about CO safety and feel free to call Fire Prevention at 602-262-6771 with any questions about CO Detectors.  Carbon monoxide Safety Tips 


Aerial Luminaries

Aerial Luminaries, also known as Sky Lanterns or Chinese Lanterns, are not only dangerous but are illegal to use in the City of Phoenix.  Once these lanterns are airborne, there is no way to control their direction or where they land.  They can easily ignite a fire if they land on buildings or brush.  There have even been instances where these luminaries landed on children and caused severe burns.  Please click on the link below to learn more about the dangers of these lanterns:  Aerial Luminaries​​


Fire Prevention related news article:

Fire Inspection: Harrowing Tales from the Front Lines 

NFPA's Top Ten Fire Sprinkler Stories of 2014 ​

Home Fire Sprinklers Save Lives​

What is a Fire Inspector? 

​What is a Fire Inspector and what does one do?  Click below to find out that answer:

What is a Fire Inspector​