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Councilman Daniel Valenzuela’s Statement on Consolidated ElectionsCouncilman Daniel Valenzuela’s Statement on Consolidated Elections<div class="ExternalClassAE2D4295AD064C9CBA053B90B7E74A5A"><p>"Yesterday, the Phoenix City Council voted to place on the August ballot proposals to change our City Charter to create for the first time a consolidated election. This means in November of even years, we will vote for Mayor, City Council, and city ballot propositions as well as for President, Congress, Governor and legislature, county offices, judgeships and state and county propositions.<br></p><p>Those who support this measure say it will guarantee a larger voter turnout and cost taxpayers less money to operate the election than if we maintain the status quo.  What this proposal really asks you to do is turn our 137-year tradition of non-partisan elections into partisan affairs. It takes away our ability to control our elections, ceding responsibility to the county and state. <br></p><p>Consolidating elections also limits the number of ballot propositions Phoenix voters can consider. Phoenix propositions will compete for space with state and county propositions.  Important voter issues may have to wait.<br></p><p>Why would we want to do that? For two decades, Phoenix has been a leader in election innovations:</p><ul><li>Consolidated precincts in 1987.                                                         </li><li>Creation of the first permanent Early Voting List in 1997.                         </li><li>First jurisdiction to develop and use Voting Centers in 2011.              <br></li></ul><p>Innovations which have been copied by cities and counties throughout Arizona.  There is no reason to change what has worked for more than a century.   There is no price you can place on the value of local control over our city's elections.<br></p><p>I cannot support consolidating our elections with the state and county. I believe it's our responsibility to ensure future generations of Phoenicians the right to decide issues of local importance, like their parents and grandparents before them, based on the merits of the issue and not the politics of the day."<br></p><p><br></p></div>5/3/2018 8:15:00 PMNick Valenzuela602-495-5405