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Why Phoenix Grows Comes Down to Quality Job OpportunitiesWhy Phoenix Grows Comes Down to Quality Job Opportunities<div class="ExternalClassA26B04CCA3A748CBB4166300DFD1CFD5"><p>​<strong>Synopsis</strong></p><p>Phoenix is the fastest-growing city in the U.S. and now one of the five largest U.S. cities. Why Phoenix grows is a combination of advanced economy opportunity in the city and metro area, and a strengthening economy with quality jobs. Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton and the City Council reflect on the reasons why.</p><p><strong>Key Facts</strong></p><ul style="list-style-type:disc;"><li>Phoenix population increases to 1,615,017, and is 5th largest U.S. city</li><li>Phoenix is fastest-growing U.S. city adding 32,113 new residents in 2016 over 2015</li><li>Phoenix city added and expanded 15,027 new jobs in 2016 over 2015</li><li>Phoenix metro GDP increased 2.1 percent over 2015, faster than the 1.5 percent U.S. average and ninth fastest of all U.S. metro areas. Phoenix metro ranks 12th in the U.S.</li><li>Phoenix metro average wage moved to 96 percent of the national average wage from 85 percent of national average in 2007, the best economic year before the Great Recession. This reflects substantial increase in quality jobs in the metro area</li></ul><p><span aria-hidden="true"></span><strong>Quotes</strong></p><p>"Growth is good, and we are happy to be the fifth-largest city in the country, but our focus in Phoenix is on quality," said Mayor Greg Stanton. "We have worked very hard to create a more innovation-based, export-driven economy that's more sustainable and brings more quality jobs into the area. It's working, and people are voting with their feet to be a part of what Phoenix is building."</p><p>"Phoenix is a great place to live and work, and our steady growth is a testament to that. Development is booming and with it comes new jobs, a more innovative economy and better opportunities for our residents, and we're on track to continue that steady incline." <em>District 1 Councilwoman Thelda Williams</em></p><p>"Phoenix is growing because we're making it a destination of choice for companies looking to relocate. We're building our economy and bringing in new people looking to take advantage of our excellent quality of life." <em>Phoenix City Councilman Jim Waring, District 2</em></p><p>"While this announcement is an indication of our City's great potential, let's not forget that with increased growth comes increased responsibility. We must continue to work together to provide sensible and fair resources and infrastructure that are available to everyone, protect our neighborhoods, and are sustainable for many generations to come." <em>Vice-Mayor, Laura Pastor, District 4</em></p><p>"Phoenix has a fresh, new brand that says it is a generous, diverse and welcoming community for entrepreneurs and innovators. Our economy is more diversified and doing better. We are leading the nation in tech job growth. Today our brand is inclusive and welcoming. It's not the fact that we moved past Philadelphia as the 5th largest city in the country, it's why we moved past them that should have our attention." <em>Daniel Valenzuela, councilman for District 5</em></p><p>"Phoenix and Arizona are open for business. The steps we've taken in recent years - making Phoenix the fastest city in the nation with 24-hour permitting and inspections - has made it easier to grow or expand businesses. Those steps are paying off in a huge way. Phoenix is rising." <em>Sal DiCiccio, councilman for District 6. </em></p><p>"We've built the foundation for our success on amazing, diverse neighborhoods, excellent city services, and support for local businesses. Our investments over the last several years in a strong public transit system and a vibrant downtown have clearly made an impact." <em>District 7 Councilman Michael Nowakowski </em></p><p>"With the news that Phoenix is America's fifth largest city, this is yet another data point showing that our community is on the rise. While growth isn't an end in and of itself, the increase in jobs, resources, and vitality that this represents is nothing but good news for Phoenix." <em>District 8 Councilwoman Kate Gallego</em></p><h3><strong>Images and availability</strong></h3><p>"Phoenix 5" 50 second video. <a href="http://lists.phoenix.gov/t/1334722/5707248/20045/3/"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">https://youtu.be/E4a2pJFstQs</span></a> <em>Credit:</em> City of Phoenix. <em>Caption:</em> "City of Phoenix celebrates its position as America's fastest-growing city and its joining the five-largest U.S. cities with a specially-created digital video."</p><p>Phoenix population growth, 2010-2016. <a href="http://lists.phoenix.gov/t/1334722/5707248/20046/6/"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/CENS%2020140525%20Phoenix%20population%20trends%202010-2016.jpg</span></a> <em>Credit:</em> City of Phoenix. <em>Caption:</em> City of Phoenix is the fastest-growing U.S. city. Source: U.S. Census Bureau Estimates, July 1 of each year."</p><p><span aria-hidden="true"></span><strong>Content</strong></p><p>Phoenix's place among the top five U.S. cities is important for Valley businesses and the other cities comprising the Phoenix metropolitan area.</p><p>"Growth is good, and we are happy to be the fifth-largest city in the country, but our focus in Phoenix is on quality," said Mayor Greg Stanton. "We have worked very hard to create a more innovation-based, export-driven economy that's more sustainable and brings more quality jobs into the area. It's working, and people are voting with their feet to be a part of what Phoenix is building."</p><p>More than the bragging rights of being the fastest-growing city in America, the population estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau putting Phoenix at 1.62 million people for 2016 answers a lot of questions. The news generated comments from around the country with news items questioning, "why Phoenix?"</p><p>"Phoenix is growing because we're making it a destination of choice for companies looking to relocate," said Phoenix City Councilman Jim Waring, District 2. "We're building our economy and bringing in new people looking to take advantage of our excellent quality of life."</p><p>Waring's comment puts a spotlight on the change in the Valley's gross domestic product over the years since the Great Recession. Phoenix generated nearly two-thirds of its recession recovery in key advanced industry sectors—technology, manufacturing, financial services and health care.</p><p>The shift in job sectors away from construction, real estate and retail over the past eight years is also visible in the metro's change in average income. Data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics released last week shows the average May 2016 metro area wage at 96 percent of the national average. In 2007, the best economic year before the recession, the Phoenix average wage was 85 percent of the national average wage.</p><p>Phoenix grew by more than 32,000 new residents between 2015 and 2015. The city of Phoenix helped with the attraction and expansion of companies adding and expanding with more than 15,000 jobs in 2016. The four advanced industries pay much more for new workers. While the average wage is nearly $23 per hour, business and financial services are average over ten dollars more at over $32 per hour, according to BLS.</p><p>Computer and technology-related businesses average nearly $39 hour, health care practitioners and technical jobs pay around $37 per hour on average. Construction, retail, hospitality and logistics all pay less than the metro area average wage.</p><p>"With the news that Phoenix is America's fifth largest city, this is yet another data point showing that our community is on the rise," said District 8 Councilwoman Kate Gallego. "While growth isn't an end in and of itself, the increase in jobs, resources, and vitality that this represents is nothing but good news for Phoenix."</p><p>Recognized May 24 with the first Governing and Living Cities Equipt to Innovate award, an initiative to recognize municipalities that are dynamically planned and smartly-resourced, among other criteria, Stanton said this is another recognition as to why more people are moving to Phoenix.</p><p>The innovative approaches have decreased the time it takes to move through city processes to open or expand businesses.</p><p>"Phoenix and Arizona are open for business," said Sal DiCiccio, councilman for District 6. "The steps we've taken in recent years - making Phoenix the fastest city in the nation with 24-hour permitting and inspections - has made it easier to grow or expand businesses. Those steps are paying off in a huge way. Phoenix is rising."</p><p>DiCiccio's comment looks at how the city and Valley have changed since the recession. Population growth slipped significantly during and immediately after the recession. Although technically, the economy bottomed in October 2010 for the metro, it took until late 2016 to regain the lost jobs. The jobs gained changed the composition of the Valley workforce, noted District 5 Councilman Daniel Valenzuela.</p><p>"Phoenix has a fresh, new brand that says it is a generous, diverse and welcoming community for entrepreneurs and innovators. Our economy is more diversified and doing better. We are leading the nation in tech job growth," said Valenzuela. "Today our brand is inclusive and welcoming. It's not the fact that we moved past Philadelphia as the 5th largest city in the country, it's why we moved past them that should have our attention."</p><p>The councilman touches on the quality of place issues that make Phoenix attractive to new residents seeking a better life, points stressed by Councilwoman Thelda Williams.</p><p>"Phoenix is a great place to live and work, and our steady growth is a testament to that," said District 1 Councilwoman Williams. "Development is booming and with it comes new jobs, a more innovative economy and better opportunities for our residents, and we're on track to continue that steady incline."</p><p>While working to make an inviting environment for growing existing business and attracting new companies into the market, Phoenix has entwined its economic development, planning, infrastructure and planning efforts.</p><p>"We've built the foundation for our success on amazing, diverse neighborhoods, excellent city services, and support for local businesses," District 7 Councilman Michael Nowakowski said. "Our investments over the last several years in a strong public transit system and a vibrant downtown have clearly made an impact."</p><p>The City Council maintains a focus on not only what's working today, but also in maintaining a strong citizen-emphasis into the future, according to Vice Mayor Laura Pastor. District 4's representative sees the population growth as opportunity to be ever-vigilant in growing the opportunities for new residents.</p><p>"While this announcement is an indication of our City's great potential, let's not forget that with increased growth comes increased responsibility," Pastor said. "We must continue to work together to provide sensible and fair resources and infrastructure that are available to everyone, protect our neighborhoods, and are sustainable for many generations to come."</p></div>5/25/2017 11:00:00 PMEric Jay Toll, Communications Manager: 602-617-3797Cynthia Weaver, Public Information Officer: 602-568-8126