​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

 

 

Phoenix Greenhouse Gas Emissions Decreased in 2020, Report Findshttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/environmental-programs/2430Environment & Sustainability8/1/2022 5:30:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2430/Newsroom_OEP_1.jpgPhoenix Greenhouse Gas Emissions Decreased in 2020, Report Finds<div class="ExternalClassBEDF875230A8467E807BA68C15384A37"><html> <p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start">​</span>The City of Phoenix's <a target="_blank" href="/oep/GHG">2020 Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Inventory</a> shows both community scale and government operations emissions decreased during that year.<br></p>“Our investments in energy efficiency, transportation electrification, and renewable energy have demonstrated progress toward Phoenix's Climate Action Plan goals," said Mayor Kate Gallego. “This work is crucial to ensuring a sustainable and prosperous future, and we will continue to deliver results in city operations and across our community."<br><br>Overall, 2020 community-wide GHG emissions were 14% lower than the 2012 baseline, while the metro economy grew by 42% and the City's population increased by 12%. Researchers from Arizona State University and Northern Arizona University found these reductions were primarily due to the electricity grid having a lower carbon intensity due to the closures of coal-fired power plants. Some of the reductions were also due to decreased travel from commuting and lower air travel during the COVID-19 pandemic.<br><br>In government operations, Phoenix 2020 GHG emissions were 25% lower than the 2005 baseline – well on their way to meeting the 2025 goal of a 40% reduction from 2005.<br><br>“These inventory numbers show the steps Phoenix is taking to cut down on emissions are working. While there is still plenty of work to be done, we are certainly headed in the right direction," said Environmental Programs Administrator Nancy Allen. “We've been reaching and exceeding emission reduction goals for 15 years, and we don't plan to stop."<br><br>While the City Vehicle Fleet did see an increase in GHG emissions due to increased service miles, Phoenix has lowered carbon intensity of the fleet with the use of alternative fuels. City Council also recently adopted the Transportation Electrification Action Plan, which calls for electrification of vehicles within the fleet and installation of on-site electric vehicle charging stations.<br><br>Thanks to investments in energy efficiency projects, buildings and facilities saw a decrease in electricity use. Water Services saw a decrease in emissions due to the capture and reuse of biogas at the 91st Avenue Wastewater Treatment Plant, and a telework program led to decreased GHG emissions from employee commuting.<br><br>In 2021, the City of Phoenix's Climate Action Plan laid out another ambitious goal of reducing community carbon emissions from buildings, transportation, and waste by 50% by 2030, thereby moving toward becoming a carbon neutral city by 2050.<br></html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/oepNewsenvironmental-programsSkyline view of Downtown PhoenixEnvironment#environment #sustainability #Phoenix #greenhousegases @CityofPhoenixAZ @MayorGallego @PHXenvironmentClimate action, environment, pollution, air quality, greenhouse gasesSpencer Blake602-818-6033602-262-6822spencer.blake@phoenix.govPHXEnvironment

 

 

Applications Open for Partner With a Principal Programhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/education/2436Education8/5/2022 9:00:00 PMhttps://youtu.be/qef0h3DIgJIApplications Open for Partner With a Principal Program<div class="ExternalClassD7259CFFD8184EC6B2C91F23334F529B"><html> <p></p> <p>Business and community leaders will be on their way back to school for the Partner with a Principal program. During the weeks of Sept. 19 through Oct. 14, local corporate executives and community leaders will work alongside Phoenix public, charter and private school principals to actively participate in the school's administration for one day. </p> <p>After experiencing the life of a school principal for a day, the principals and their executive counterparts will discuss how local businesses, community leaders and schools can form lasting partnerships to improve the quality of education, workplace readiness and leadership development programs in Phoenix.<br></p> <p>Last year, 29 businesses partnered with 10 Phoenix school districts and three charter schools. Local businesses invested in Phoenix schools and provided resources to students such as science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM) opportunities. <br></p> <p>Those interested in participating in the Partner with a Principal program, can register online at <a href="/education" target="_blank">phoenix.gov/education</a>. Applications open on Aug. 8 and the deadline to register is Friday, Sept. 2. All participants must attend a virtual information session also on Sept. 7, at 4 p.m. ​<br></p> <p>​</p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/educationVideo
MLK Awards Program Accepting Nominationshttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/equal-opportunity/1458Equal Opportunity8/5/2022 8:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1458/Newsroom_EOD_013.jpgMLK Awards Program Accepting Nominations<div class="ExternalClass82D7F9EF3EB44F0584464F02A61AA990"><html> <p>If you know someone, including youth, who has made an impact on the quality of life of Phoenix residents, we urge you to nominate them for an award.</p> <p>The Living the Dream Award recognizes individuals who embody the ideas of Dr. King through their continued personal commitment to human relations and social justice.</p> <p>The Lifetime Achievement Award recognizes exceptional individuals who have made Phoenix a better place to live through a lifelong dedication to promoting social and economic justice, defending civil rights, and enhancing the dignity of all people. Nominations must emulate the lifelong dedication of Calvin C. Goode.</p> <p>The deadline to submit a <a target="_blank" href="https://forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=XGm5lg5PvUKK37p1V2A0a8dCr72llv1Cj74wxYXqWblUMkZCNlZaTlpVVFhQV0hXTjNHMzdSRjFOSC4u">nomination form</a> online is 5 p.m. Friday, Sept. 9.</p> <p>For more information, call 602-534-1279. </p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/eodNews
Applications Open For Backyard Garden Programhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/environmental-programs/2435Environment & Sustainability8/3/2022 11:30:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2435/raised bed garden 2.jpghttps://youtu.be/Uj3hPslz1LYApplications Open For Backyard Garden Program<div class="ExternalClass2E69FAB9CB8548B8BC9F48356C8C7A19"><html>​ ​The City of Phoenix Office of Environmental Programs is beginning the next cohort of the <a href="/oep/backyard-garden" target="_blank">Backyard Garden Program​</a>, where participants will receive, at no cost to them, a garden system, including training, support, and maintenance (as needed) for one year.<br><br>Thanks to American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds, the program already supplied 92 garden systems to community members in the first year. In year two, the program will provide 178 households with either a traditional raised bed garden (provided by <a target="_blank" href="https://tigermountainfoundation.org/non-profit-community-garden/">TigerMountain Foundation</a>), a regenerative agriculture system called a '<a target="_blank" href="https://lehrgarden.com/">LEHR Garden</a>,' or an aquaponics system (provided by <a target="_blank" href="https://www.nxthorizon.com/Home.html">NxT Horizon</a>).<br><br>“Literally I can go outside, harvest what I need, use it to cook that night. That's really convenient and inexpensive," said Xavier Jones, who has a city-funded aquaponics system in his backyard. He grew more than ten pounds of produce in the first few months.<br><br>Aquaponics systems grow produce on rafts floating in water. Inside the water are fish that provide nutrients for the plants, which in turn clean the water for the fish. Aquaponics expert and instructor Dr. George Brooks, Jr. makes the whole process simple for backyard gardeners.<br><br>“To see them as their individual plants start to grow and prosper and vine out and bloom and then produce fruit has been great," he said.<br><br>The City of Phoenix is looking for passionate community members with an interest in growing food and who are willing to make a yearlong commitment to backyard gardening. Gardens will be installed in either the fall of 2022 or early spring of 2023. <br><br>“It doesn't feel like work to me. It doesn't feel like a chore. It's something I'm passionate about," said Jayleen McGehee of working in the raised bed garden that was installed in her backyard for free. “I go outside, get sun, grow things, and I provide for my family, because food is expensive right now."<br><br>This program is for residents living in single-family homes only. Check out the <a target="_blank" href="https://phoenix-gov.formstack.com/forms/bgp_2_en">application</a> for the full requirements. Applications for the Backyard Garden Program are open until 11:59 pm on August 30, 2022.​<br><br><br><span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span><p><br></p></html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/oepVideo

 

 

Environment & SustainabilityPHXEnvironmenthttps://www.phoenix.gov/oepEnvironment & Sustainabilityenvironmental-programsEnvironmenthttps://www.youtube.com/user/cityofphoenixazhttps://nextdoor.com/agency-detail/az/phoenix/city-of-phoenixcityofphoenixazTwitter

 ‭(Hidden)‬ Catalog-Item Reuse