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Critical Incident Briefing: Officer-involved Shooting near 27th Avenue and Orangewood Avenue https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/1708Police1/13/2021 9:40:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1708/CIB.pnghttps://youtu.be/2t7RZg2iVnsCritical Incident Briefing: Officer-involved Shooting near 27th Avenue and Orangewood Avenue <div class="ExternalClass6070AB16084449DE9044805BCEB62DAC"><html> <p>​​​The Phoenix Police Department released a Critical Incident Briefing (CIB) video which includes information, audio, video and pictures related to an officer-involved shooting (OIS) that occurred on December 28, 2020, in the area of 27th Ave. and Orangewood Ave.<br><br>This incident started at approximately 8:45 p.m., when a woman called 911 to report that her ex-boyfriend was in the patio of her apartment and was refusing to leave. The caller also informed the 911 operator that he had been violent in the past with her and that he was causing problems for her.  <br><br>The caller identified the man as 30-year-old, Jordan Crawford. <br><br>The officers arrived and the suspect was no longer at the apartment and they began to look for the Crawford.<br><br>Within minutes, Crawford was found walking through an open area of the apartment complex. An officer called out to Crawford to detain him but Crawford did not stop and told the officer that he had a gun as he placed his right hand behind his rear waistband area.<br><br>Crawford and the officer continued to talk and walk through the complex. The officer told Crawford to show him his hands, which he refused and continued to walk backwards from officers. The interaction between the officers and Crawford continued onto 27th Avenue. <br><br>Vehicle traffic stopped just missing Crawford as he crossed the street. Officers were able to contain him as he reached the east sidewalk. Once he got to the sidewalk Crawford stopped and leaned forward and began to yell with his hand behind his back. He began to count down and when he got to one, he swiftly pulled his hand from his back and the officers reacted to the threat. <br><br>Officers deployed less lethal munition to safely approach Crawford in an effort to administer first aid. <br><br>During the investigation a weapon was not recovered. <br><br>The five officers involved in this incident are all assigned to the Cactus park precinct. There were no injuries to officers or any other community members.<br><br>This incident is the subject of both an internal and a criminal investigation, which will be reviewed by the Maricopa County Attorney's Office. Conclusions about whether the actions of the officers are consistent with department policy and the law will not be made until all facts are known and the investigation is complete.<br><br>Public records law required redaction of certain personal identifying information before video is released publicly. This is why you see some parts of Body Worn Camera (BWC) blurred or covered with a black box. Redacted video is released to local media in conjunction with the release of this Critical Incident Briefing for independent review and publication. Complete, unedited versions of the BWC are released to attorneys and the courts as evidence in a criminal case. <br><br>Please be advised, the attached video may contain strong language as well as graphic images which may be disturbing to some people. Viewer discretion is advised.<br></p> </html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeVideopolicePolice
Critical Incident Briefing: Officer-involved Shooting near 27th Avenue and Indian School Roadhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/1707Police1/13/2021 9:26:00 PMhttps://youtu.be/_w202v2AWccCritical Incident Briefing: Officer-involved Shooting near 27th Avenue and Indian School Road<div class="ExternalClass040D9C3F32AF49BEAFF85DFAFC29D12A"><html> <p></p> <strong>WARNING: The attached video may contain strong language as well as graphic images which may be disturbing to some people. Viewer discretion is advised.</strong> <br> <br>The Phoenix Police Department released a Critical Incident Briefing (CIB) video that includes audio, visuals and information related to an officer-involved shooting (OIS) which occurred on December 28, 2020, at approximately 12:15 a.m. in the area of 27th Avenue and Indian School Road.<br><br>Phoenix Police Patrol Officers were in the area of 27th Avenue and Indian School Road on an unrelated traffic stop when they heard shots fired just north of their location.<br><br>Officers left the traffic stop and drove to the area where the shots were heard. A female officer was flagged down in the parking lot of a strip mall near Indian School Road and 27th Avenue by a woman later identified as 47-year-old, Helen Jones.<br><br>Jones told the officer that someone was trying to get into her truck.<br><br>The officer asked Jones if she had any weapons and told her to lift her shirt and show her waistband. Jones denied having any weapons but refused to show the right-side hip area where she appeared to be concealing a gun. The officer began giving verbal commands to Jones.<br><br>The officer requested additional units to her location and advised them the woman appeared to be armed and may have been involved in the shots fired. Additional officers arrived and communicated with Jones for approximately 13 minutes.<br><br>Jones ignored officer’s direction and turned towards officers, pointing a gun at them. Two officers fired at Jones striking her. A third officer also deployed less lethal munition from a stunbag.<br><br>Officers provided first-aid until the Phoenix Fire Department arrived on scene. Jones was transported to the hospital where she was pronounced deceased.<br><br>The weapon used by Jones was recovered at the scene.<br><br>The officers involved are assigned to the Maryvale Estrella Mountain Precinct. One officer is 24 years old with 3 years of service and the second officer is 26 years old with 4 years of service.<br><br>There were no injuries to officers or other community members.<br><br>Conclusions about whether the actions of the officers are consistent with department policy and the law will not be made until all facts are known and the investigation is complete. An internal investigation by the Professional Standard Bureau is currently underway, in addition to a criminal investigation. Once the criminal investigation is complete it will then be reviewed by the Maricopa County Attorney’s Office.<br><br>Public records law required redaction of certain personal identifying information before video is released publicly. This is why you may see some parts of Body Worn Camera (BWC) blurred or covered with a black box. Redacted video is released to local media in conjunction with the release of this Critical Incident Briefing for independent review and publication. Complete, unedited versions of the BWC are released to attorneys and the courts as evidence in a criminal case.<br></html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeVideopolicePolice
Critical Incident Briefing: Officer-involved Shooting near 51st Avenue and Osborn Roadhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/1696Police1/8/2021 4:51:00 PMhttps://youtu.be/tNqNwk_0JX4Critical Incident Briefing: Officer-involved Shooting near 51st Avenue and Osborn Road<div class="ExternalClass91364E30B0B94CBD85674ECD4FAEE4F4"><html> <p>​<em style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">Please be advised, the attached video may contain strong language as well as graphic images which may be disturbing to some people. Viewer discretion is advised.</em></p> <p>The Phoenix Police Department released a Critical Incident Briefing (CIB) video that includes audio, visuals and information related to an officer-involved shooting which occurred in the early morning hours on December 25, 2020.</p> <p>The incident started when a family gathering turned into a domestic dispute. A 911 caller reported that the suspect, later identified as Samuel Vasquez, threatened one victim with a knife before getting into a vehicle and crashing into a parked van that another person was standing next to. The caller also reported there was a child inside the vehicle.</p> <p>“Um he's tryin' a… Uh my nieces boyfriend trying to run over my… My niece and he already crashed into my husband's van" the caller told the 911 operator. “And he has a knife on him."</p> <p>Vasquez continued ramming his vehicle into the van parked in front of the house.</p> <p>Patrol officers from the Maryvale Precinct were dispatched to the call, and as they arrived, they saw a vehicle leaving the area. The vehicle, driven by Vasquez, returned almost immediately, driving over the sidewalk and onto the front yard toward multiple people. One officer observed this occurring from his position on the sidewalk nearby, and fired his weapon, striking Vasquez.</p> <p>Vasquez was hand-cuffed, and officers rendered medical aid until Phoenix Fire Personnel transported him to a local hospital for treatment.</p> <p>During the investigation, it was learned that the child that was reported to be in the suspect vehicle had actually been brought inside the home by one of the victims, prior to the arrival of the Police.</p> <p>Vasquez was released from the hospital on December 27 and booked on multiple aggravated assault charges.</p> <p>The officer involved in this shooting is assigned to the Maryvale Estrella Precinct, Patrol Division, and has been with the department for 3 and ½ years.</p> <p>This incident is the subject of both an internal and a criminal investigation, which will be reviewed by the Maricopa County Attorney's Office.<strong> </strong></p> <p>Conclusions about whether the actions of the officers are consistent with department policy and the law will not be made until all facts are known and the investigation is complete.​​<br></p> </html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeVideopolicePolice
Phoenix Police Chief Jeri Williams Reflects on 2020, Looks Ahead to 2021https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/1695Police1/8/2021 4:29:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1695/Holiday Message from Chief Jeri Williams (1).pngPhoenix Police Chief Jeri Williams Reflects on 2020, Looks Ahead to 2021<div class="ExternalClass486449C1D31546E8ADEF59E15EB79D12"><html> <p>​Twelve months ago, we began a new year with optimism. A year later, 2020 is behind us, marked as one of the most unique years in modern history. The challenges of a global pandemic, rising domestic violence and homicide rates in cities across the country, and social unrest surrounding race, policing, and politics have impacted our country and our community. </p> <p>I know from experience it is through challenges that we grow and become better. As the Chief of the Phoenix Police Department, I am confident we completed 2020 a better department.  We have implemented substantial changes that improve our ability to meet community expectations to serve, protect, and reduce crime in Phoenix while treating community members with dignity and respect.</p> <p> <strong>CRIME TRENDS</strong> </p> <p>Our department had some 825,000 interactions with the public in 2020. Our Communications Bureau answered more than 2 million calls for service. Thefts, burglaries, and rapes are all down. After a decade of lower murder rates, Phoenix mirrored a national trend, with the number of people killed at the hands of another reaching numbers more like what our city experienced in the early 2000's. Despite the increase, our Homicide Unit is working hard to find justice for these victims, with a clearance rate nearly 10% higher than the national average.</p> <p>Early in the year when we saw a trend of increasing domestic violence, our department teamed up with other City of Phoenix and community resources along with media partners to launch the <a target="_blank" href="/police/domesticviolence">Domestic Violence Help!</a> campaign. This multi-pronged approach helped raise awareness and provide resources to potential victims.  </p> <p> <strong>LINE OF DUTY DEATH</strong> </p> <p>A call for service regarding a domestic dispute among roommates led to tragedy for our department. On Sunday afternoon, March 29, Commander Greg Carnicle responded to a north Phoenix home where a man refused to leave when his roommates tried to evict him. The highly decorated Commander led a team of officers up the stairs to talk with the man. Instead, the man pulled out a gun, shooting and killing Commander Carnicle and injuring Officers Marissa Dowhan and Alicia Hubert. Greg and I grew up through the department together over three decades. I respected him as a man of faith, who was committed to his wife, their four children and his growing group of grandchildren. Unfortunately, COVID-19 restrictions limited traditional services for Commander Carnicle, but tributes honoring the 31-year veteran of the force poured in from across the country on social media.  </p> <p> <strong>COVID-19</strong> </p> <p>COVID-19 impacted many aspects of policing. After a series of local and state Executive Orders, we initiated an Incident Management Team to address solutions to the pandemic.  With a focus on education, officers interacted with the public, sharing important health and safety information regarding the virus. At that same time, we looked for additional ways we could support the community. This included the detailed process of certifying our Crime Lab to provide support for COVID-19 testing. The Phoenix Crime Lab is the only crime lab in the country to provide this community service.</p> <p> <strong>OFFICER-INVOLVED SHOOTINGS & POLICE REFORM</strong> </p> <p>Protecting human life and ensuring safety is at the core of effective policing. When an officer uses lethal force to protect themselves or others, it has deep impact on loved ones of the suspect, the involved officers and the larger community. Phoenix residents rightfully expect officers to be faithful guardians of public safety and only use force as a last resort. This community expectation was reinforced after the untimely death of George Floyd where Phoenix was one of more than 2,000 cities nationwide with demonstrations calling for police reform. These demonstrations were largely peaceful, and I appreciate the commitment of our Community Engagement Bureau, our Central City Precinct and the many, many officers who assisted.  </p> <p>I was able to speak directly with and hear the concerns of organizers. They raised issues laid out in the <a target="_blank" href="https://8cantwait.org/">8 Can't Wait</a> campaign, designed to reduce violent encounters between police and the public. This led to an evaluation of several of our policies to reflect the high expectation we have of our sworn and civilian employees. These changes include banning neck restraints such as the carotid control technique and instead focusing on compassionate restraint training for all officers. The Duty to Intervene policy now makes it clear that we expect all employees to step in and stop what they know to be excessive force by a fellow employee. We strengthened the wording to make it clear shooting at moving vehicles is only an option in extreme, life-threatening circumstances. We also updated our policy to render aid, outlining the expectation that officers provide first aid until skilled medical personnel arrive. </p> <p> <strong>LOOKING AHEAD</strong> </p> <p>There is still more to be done, not only within the police department but through a coordinated effort across the community. Nowhere is this more evident than the need for mental and behavior health services. Despite the vital role police play as first responders, we are not always the appropriate response to a 911 call for service. Rethinking who responds to mental health, homelessness and domestic violence calls will strengthen our community.</p> <p>Internally, we've launched a new initiative to build a team of employees focused on the department mission to constantly and continuously improve both as an organization and as individual employees.  I organized the Center for Continuous Improvement (CCI) with 5 key focus areas: operation & policy management, accountability, technology & transparency, messaging and employee wellness & development. This group is laser focused on evaluating best practices so the Phoenix Police Department can always be moving forward.</p> <p>The CCI will also evaluate recommendations from national organizations such as the National Police Foundation and the US Conference of Mayors. During the nationwide demonstrations calling for police reform, I participated on the <a target="_blank" href="https://www.usmayors.org/issues/police-reform/">US Conference of Mayors Committee on Police Reform and Racial Justice</a>. We came up with multiple recommendations to reimagine policing. Many we already do. Some still need work. These include things like creating a use of force data dashboard, evaluating tactics to ensure we are impartial in our policing, and building up our community policing programs.</p> <p>Phoenix is a fast-growing city, attracting people who want to live, work and play in a safe environment. I know under the leadership of Mayor Kate Gallego and the Phoenix City Council, 2021 will be a year where the Phoenix Police Department will thrive in our mission to support the safety and security of all residents and visitors.</p> </html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeNewspolicePolice
Phoenix Police Mobile Apphttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/1692Police1/5/2021 9:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1692/FB-IG_App.pnghttps://youtu.be/9RFk4rxnOWUPhoenix Police Mobile App<div class="ExternalClass8CC0C5FCFBEB4A2BA72E8F38E93140BC"><html> <p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span>The Phoenix Police Department now has a mobile app, bringing a variety of resources and information to one place.  </p><p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> Users can use the app to access online reporting, crime statistics, precinct locations, phone numbers, career opportunities, virtual block watch, victims’ rights information, and more. Users can also turn on notifications from the precinct they live in to receive news updates and information on events in their area.  </p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span> <p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span>The app is available on the <a href="https://apps.apple.com/us/app/phoenix-police-department/id1538385273" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" data-auth="NotApplicable">App Store</a>  or  <a href="https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=net.apexmobile.am0510&hl=en_US&gl=US" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" data-auth="NotApplicable">Google Play</a> .  ​<br></p><span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span><img style="margin:5px;width:250px;vertical-align:baseline;height:250px;" class="" src="/policesite/MediaAssets/FB-IG_App.png" /><span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span><img class="" style="color:rgb(32, 31, 30);font-size:15px;margin:5px;width:250px;height:250px;vertical-align:baseline;" src="/policesite/MediaAssets/FB-IG_Reporting.png" /><span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span><span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> <div style="margin:0px;padding:0px;border:0px;font-stretch:inherit;font-size:15px;line-height:inherit;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(32, 31, 30);"> </div> <div style="margin:0px;padding:0px;border:0px;font-stretch:inherit;font-size:15px;line-height:inherit;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(32, 31, 30);"> <br></div><img style="color:rgb(32, 31, 30);font-size:15px;margin:5px;width:250px;height:250px;vertical-align:baseline;" class="" src="/policesite/MediaAssets/FB-IG_Precinct.png" /><span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span><img style="color:rgb(32, 31, 30);font-size:15px;margin:5px;width:250px;height:250px;" src="/policesite/MediaAssets/FB-IG_Accountability.png" /><span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span><p> <br> </p> </html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeVideopolicePolice
Hands-Free AZ Enforcement Begins January 1, 2021https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/1683Police12/29/2020 2:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1683/handsfreeaz_itsagainstthelaw.pnghttps://youtu.be/jUY_XQrNm4cHands-Free AZ Enforcement Begins January 1, 2021<div class="ExternalClass7D99AAEC8F6B45FEABEB17C5B3CE8A8F"><html> <span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;"> <img style="margin:5px;width:502px;" src="/policesite/MediaAssets/IMG_2665.JPG" /><br><a target="_blank" href="https://www.azleg.gov/ars/28/00914.htm">ARS Section 28-914​</a> – Use of portable wireless communication device while driving</span> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start" style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;"></span> ​ <br> <p>This new law is covered under ARS 28-914 & generally applies to portable wireless communication devices & stand-alone electronic devices, defined as follows:<br></p> <ul> <li> <p>Portable wireless communication device (PWCD) definition<br></p> </li> <ul> <li> <p>​A cell phone, portable telephone, text messaging device, personal digital assistant, stand-alone computer, GPS receiver, or any similar device that is used to initiate or receive communication, information, or data. </p> </li> <li> <p>It does not include.</p> </li> <ul> <li> <p>Radio<br></p> </li> <li> <p>CB<br></p> </li> <li> <p>CB hybrid</p> </li> <li> <p>Commercial 2-way radio communication device</p> </li> <li> <p>In-vehicle security, navigation or remote diagnostics system</p> </li> </ul> </ul> <li> <p>Stand-alone e​lectronic device (SAED)<br></p> </li> <ul> <li> <p>A portable device other than a PWCD that stores audio or video data files to be retrieved on demand by a user (e.g., Ipods).<br></p></li> </ul> </ul><div><img class="" style="margin:5px;width:582px;vertical-align:middle;height:188px;" src="/policesite/MediaAssets/handsfreeaz_itsagainstthelaw.png" /><br></div><div><img class="" style="margin:5px;width:582px;vertical-align:middle;height:186px;" src="/policesite/MediaAssets/handsfreeaz_itsokayto.png" /><br></div> <p></p> <p>Here are the specifics of ARS 28-914:  <br>Unless stopped for a red light or at a train crossing, it is unlawful to use a PWCD while:<br></p> <ul> <li>Driving on a street or highway if the driver is physically holding or supporting a portable wireless communication device with any part of the person's body<br></li> <ul> <li>​Unless used with an earpiece, headphone or worn on the wrist to conduct a voice-based communication<br></li> </ul> <li>Driving on a street or highway if the driver is physically holding or supporting an SAED<br></li> <li>Writes, sends or reads any text-based communication, including a text message, instant message, email, or internet data, on a PWCD or SAED<br></li></ul>Exemptions to ARS 29-914:<br><ul><li>Use of a PWCD or SAED while driving on a street or highway if such conduct is performed by using a voice-based communication system</li><ul><li>​This includes, through use of a PWCD or SAED, to direct the writing, sending, reading or other communicating of any text-based communication</li></ul><li><span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">Use of a PWCD or SAED while driving on a street or highway if such conduct is perform</span><span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">ed when used in hands-free mode for;</span></li></ul><ul dir="" class="" style=""><ul><li>Navigation</li><li>GPS</li><li>Obtaining motor vehicle information</li><li>Information related to driving a vehicle.</li></ul></ul><p></p><p></p><p></p>ARS 29-914 does NOT apply to:<br><ul><li><span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">Operators </span><span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">of authorized emergency vehicle</span></li><li><span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">Law enforcement or probation vehicles while acting in an official capacity</span><br></li><li><span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">FCC licensed operator of a radio frequency device other than a PWCD</span><br></li><li><span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">Operator of two-way radio private land mobile radio system in the scope of operator's duties and who is operating a fleet vehicle or who has a CDL</span><br></li><li><span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">Use of PWCD to report an emergency or illegal activity</span><br></li><li><span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">Use of PWCD that is affixed to the v</span><span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">e</span><span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">hicle to relay information as a part of the driver's duties to a dispatcher or a digital network or software service</span></li></ul><img class="" style="margin:5px;width:582px;vertical-align:text-bottom;height:188px;" src="/policesite/MediaAssets/handsfreeaz_violations.png" /><br><p></p></html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeVideopolicePolice
Phoenix Police K9 Unit Expands in 2020: New K9, New Facility, and New Training Toolshttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/1672Police12/21/2020 7:00:00 PMhttps://youtu.be/aDxzwS5GUFYPhoenix Police K9 Unit Expands in 2020: New K9, New Facility, and New Training Tools<div class="ExternalClassE139FF12F9D74359A08B18E023622311"><html>You've heard it before and y<span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span><span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span>ou'll hear it again: a dog is a man's best friend. But in policework, a dog may just be a man's best colleague, too. <br><br>"Mattis, he's assigned to one of our SWAT teams," Phoenix Police Officer Christopher Villa said of K9 Mattis. "And just recently, we had a guy, armed suspect, he didn't want to come out of the house. So we had to send Mattis in there, and he got to the suspect before the officer's did."<br><br>K9 Mattis joined the force at the beginning of 2020, purchased with funds from the <a target="_blank" href="https://phoenixpolicefoundation.org/">Phoenix ​Police Foundation</a>. He is one of four dogs added to the unit this year, bringing the Phoenix Police K9 Unit to 17 dogs total. <br><br>"It was really a great example of the partnership between the Phoenix Police Foundation and the city because there was really a need for new dogs, and there was a budget for three," Tim Thomas, president of the Phoenix Police Foundation, said. "So we were able to step in and fill that gap right there instead of waiting for the next cycle."<br><br>The main priority for these dogs is to be a locating tool for police. Sometimes, that is to locate suspects. <br><br>"We send these dogs into some of the most dangerous situations before we'll send an officer in there," Officer Villa said. "Ultimately, we love these dogs and we treat them like family members, but at the same time, I gotta have all these guys be able to come home to their families. And that's why these dogs are huge for us because we can send them into a dark room where a bad guy's hiding, and be able to get to them before that bad guy gets to us."<br><br>But K9s are also used to find drugs and explosives, or other crime scene evidence. This year, the K9 Unit got a new behavior shaping device to help train dogs in odor detection. Narcotics trainer Lisa Fisher said this device is integral in preparing dogs for their jobs. <br><br>"We'll take a PVC pipe that's stuffed with cotton balls full of the narcotic odor that we train the dogs on: methamphetamine, heroine, and cocaine," Officer Fisher said. "We stuff the pipe down in that tube. We'll hide the tube under one of these boxes. And when the dog finds and alerts on the odor, we launch the tube and then it launches the pipe out kind of like that."<br><br>The unit also got new bite suits for bite training. Plus, they got a new fenced-in facility with a shade at the Phoenix Regional Police Academy. So now, instead of going to city parks and other public places, officers can bring their K9s to train and play at the Academy. All of this was not possible without the Phoenix Police Foundation, continually supporting the force and ensuring the safety of our community. <br></html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeVideopolicePolice
Critical Incident Briefing: Officer-involved Shooting near 19th Avenue and Dunlap Avenue https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/1665Police12/16/2020 5:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1665/CIB.pnghttps://youtu.be/XlPu_cHdAUICritical Incident Briefing: Officer-involved Shooting near 19th Avenue and Dunlap Avenue <div class="ExternalClass6A84F7CDD9BD4762878EE86AE3F4B545"><html> <p>The Phoenix Police Department released a Critical Incident Briefing (CIB) video that includes information, audio, video and pictures related to an officer-involved shooting (OIS) that occurred on December 3, 2020, at approximately 3:40 a.m. in the area of 19th Avenue and Dunlap Avenue.</p><p>This incident started with a 911 call where the caller reported hearing people fighting and a gun shot at an apartment complex near 19th Avenue and Dunlap. </p><p>When officers arrived on scene, they found an adult man dead lying on a sidewalk near the apartments. </p><p>Officers focused on a vacant apartment where witnesses said a suspect may be inside.  They established communication, remaining outside but making announcements for anyone inside to come out. Eventually, five people exited the apartment.</p><p>Officers continued making announcements for anyone inside the apartment to exit. </p><p>​While one team was in front of the apartment, another in the rear broke a window to get a better view inside but did not see anyone. About an hour after first arriving on scene, the officers made the decision to enter the apartment, led by police K9 Dennis. </p><p>The officers continued to identify themselves as Phoenix Police Officers as they prepared to enter the apartment looking for anyone still inside.  Dennis enters the home first, searching the living room and kitchen. Officers then enter the apartment and the K9 moves further back toward the bedrooms. That's when the suspect, 42 year-old Maurice Jackson, began shooting, hitting Dennis.</p><p>No officers fired any shots inside of the apartment. </p><p>As Dennis and his handler rushed to the vet, the other officers exited the apartment with one team set up to the south, and one to the west.  Both teams of officers had a clear view of the front door.  </p><p>Less than a minute after shooting the K9, Jackson exited the apartment armed with a handgun, yelled something and advanced towards officers. Both Jackson and five officers fired their weapons. Jackson was struck by gunfire and fell to the ground. </p><p>After the shooting, officers utilized less lethal bean bag rounds and a second K9 to safely extract Jackson away from his firearm and out of the direct line of sight of the apartment, which still had not been deemed safe. Officers transported Jackson out of the immediate area to the Phoenix Fire Department, where he was pronounced deceased.</p><p>The handgun Jackson used was located next to where he fell, along with a knife and brass knuckles that he was wearing at the time of the shooting.</p><p>A fully marked police vehicle, positioned directly behind two of the officers who fired at Jackson, was struck by Jackson's gunfire.</p><p>K9 Dennis was taken to an emergency veterinary clinic with gunshot wounds to his mouth, neck and chest cavity.  He is expected to make a full recovery.</p><p>The investigation revealed Jackson was the suspect from the original shooting homicide the officers responded to that evening. </p><p>There were five officers involved in the shooting, all assigned as patrol officers in the Desert Horizon Precinct. Two officers have two years of service, and three of the officers have four years of service with the department.</p><p>This incident is the subject of both an internal and a criminal investigation, which will be reviewed by the Maricopa County Attorney's Office. Conclusions about whether the actions of the officers are consistent with department policy and the law will not be made until all facts are known and the investigation is complete. </p><p>Public records law required redaction of certain personal identifying information before video is released publicly. This is why you see some parts of Body Worn Camera (BWC) blurred or covered with a black box. Unedited, redacted video is released to local media in conjunction with the release of this Critical Incident Briefing for independent review and publication. Complete, unedited versions of the BWC are released to attorneys and the courts as evidence in a criminal case.  </p><p>Please be advised, the attached video may contain strong language as well as graphic images which may be disturbing to some people. Viewer discretion is advised.​</p> </html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeVideopolicePolice

 

 

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Face Coverings Requiredhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/AdBox/DispForm.aspx?ID=18https://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/AdBox/Attachments/18/Mask_Slider.jpgFace Coverings Required<div class="ExternalClass8DE6AF03F13B43BAB7648EA69C9E912F"><html>​Every person in the city of Phoenix, ages two and over, shall cover their nose and mouth whenever they are away from their home or residence. Learn more about this declaration<br></html></div>Newshttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/em-and-hs/13536/19/2020 8:18:55 PM2/28/2021 8:18:55 PM

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