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Critical Incident Briefing: September 10, 2021 7th Avenue and Willetta Streethttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/2080Police9/24/2021 10:03:00 PMhttps://youtu.be/CJV3YUqEuuICritical Incident Briefing: September 10, 2021 7th Avenue and Willetta Street<div class="ExternalClass1FB58C88A1744D05BCB6F52B856D3DB3"><html> <p></p>WARNING: The attached video may contain strong language as well as graphic images which may be disturbing to some people. Viewer discretion is advised. <br> <br>The Phoenix Police Department released a Critical Incident Briefing (CIB) video that includes audio, visuals and information related to a death investigation that occurred after a man was detained by police on September 10, 2021, near 7th Avenue and Willetta Street.<br><br>The incident began when Phoenix police received multiple reports of a male walking naked in the street. <br><br>The man in this incident was later identified as 28-year-old Jessee Rickman. <br><br> “…he was in the, the median, like the middle lane, uh, just walking down the street completely naked," reported one 9-1-1 caller. <br><br>When officers first arrived, they saw the Rickman in the middle of the road, naked, appearing upset, and making non-sensical statements.  Additional officers were called to the scene. <br><br>Officers tried to detain Rickman in order to move him out of the roadway. He resisted, resulting in a struggle and him going to the ground. During the struggle, Rickman kicked officers and hissed at them. It took officers about three minutes to place Rickman in handcuffs.<br><br>Rickman's legs were secured with a RIPP restraint which was linked to his handcuffs and a spit hood was also placed on his head.  A RIPP restraint is a device used to secure the legs of an individual to minimize their ability to kick. A spit hood is a mesh cloth material that prevents a person from spitting on others while still allowing them to breath. <br><br>He was then put on his side, in what is known as the recover position, while officers on scene requested the assistance from the Phoenix Fire Department. <br><br>Rickman was moved to a seated position on the sidewalk while waiting for paramedics. When Phoenix Fire Paramedics arrived, they began evaluating Rickman. About 10 minutes into the evaluation, an officer realized that Rickman had lost consciousness. Phoenix Fire began lifesaving measures and transported Rickman to a local hospital where he was subsequently pronounced deceased. <br><br>The officers involved in this incident are assigned to the Mountain View and Central City Precincts. They range from 23-50 years of age and have between two and 17 years of service with the Phoenix Police Department. <br><br>There were no injuries to officers or other community members.<br> <br>Conclusions about whether the actions of the officers are consistent with department policy and the law will not be made until all facts are known and the investigation is complete. An internal investigation by the Professional Standard Bureau is currently underway, in addition to a criminal investigation. Once the criminal investigation is complete it will then be reviewed by the Maricopa County Attorney's Office.<br> <br>Public records law required redaction of certain personal identifying information before video is released publicly. Therefore, you may see some parts of Body Worn Camera (BWC) blurred or covered with a black box. Redacted video is released to local media in conjunction with the release of this Critical Incident Briefing for independent review and publication. Complete, unedited versions of the BWC are released to attorneys and the courts as evidence in a criminal case.<br></html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeVideopolicePolice
Composite Sketch Helps Identify Sexual Assault Suspecthttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/2065Police9/17/2021 12:33:00 AMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2065/Suspect Arrest Newsroom.pngComposite Sketch Helps Identify Sexual Assault Suspect<div class="ExternalClass3679A3EEB88E4C7196B0D121B6C0838E"><html> ​A heads-up Phoenix police crime analyst and good old-fashioned police work helped identify and arrest a sexual assault suspect less than 48 hours after the attack. <br><br> On September 13, 2021, just after 7:30 a.m., Phoenix officers responded to the canal bank in the area of 200 East Las Palmaritas Drive. When officers got there, they contacted a woman who reported that she had been attacked and sexually assaulted by an unknown male, who fled the area prior to police arrival.  <br><br> Detectives, patrol officers and civilian analysists immediately began working relentlessly on this case. The victim was able to assist a forensic artist in creating a sketch to circulate to the public. As part of that investigation, a crime analyst took the initiative to compare the sketch, being readied for release, to recent booking photos. The analyst not only recognized a similarity between the sketch and a recently arrested suspect, but the analyst noticed the shirt the suspect was wearing in the booking photo, matched the descrption of the shirt the sexual assault victim provided to detectives. <br><br> That suspect was arrested for a misdemeanor assault for an incident that took place the morning after the canal attack. The second assault occurred, on September 14, 2021, at about 6 a.m., in the area of 7th Avenue and Campbell Avenue. The victim from that incident was walking on 7th Avenue when an adult male assaulted and tackled the victim to the ground. Two Good Samaritans intervened and restrained the male suspect until police arrived. That suspect, Charles Torbeck Jn Michely was arrested and booked into Maricopa County Jail for one count of assault.<br><br> While pursuing the similarity between the sketch and Michely, detectives learned that Michely was wearing a GPS ankle monitor.  Data from that monitor placed him in the area of the canal sexual assault, and the victim in that case was able to identify Michely in a photographic lineup, as the man who attacked her.<br><br> <p>Additional booking charges were added to Michely including attempted murder, sexual assault, and kidnapping. ​<br></p> </html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeNewspolicePolice
Phoenix Police Offer $7500 Hiring Bonus https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/2031Police8/19/2021 10:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2031/hiringbonus.jpgPhoenix Police Offer $7500 Hiring Bonus <div class="ExternalClassDEF41AEB92E148A9BC35057DAFADECA6"><html> The City of Phoenix has announced a new incentive program to attract police officer recruits and lateral police officers to become part of the Phoenix Police Department. These incentives will help boost the already aggressive national and local recruiting campaign currently underway.<br><br>This incentive program is divided into three areas; new recruits, sworn officers who want to lateral to Phoenix, and current employee referrals. <br><br>The hiring bonus is $7500 for both police officer recruits and lateral sworn officers. Police recruits will receive the incentive in three installments, $2500 at hire, $2500 upon graduating the Phoenix Regional Police Academy and $2500 after successful completion of a one-year probationary period. Lateral sworn officers will receive two incentive payments, $3750 when sworn in as a Phoenix Police Officer and $3750 after successful completion of a one-year probationary period. <br><br>An additional incentive has been established for current city employees who refer individuals to the police department. Those employees are eligible for a $2500 referral fee. That payout will come in two stages, $1250 when the applicant is hired and $1250 after the new officer's successful completion of a one-year probationary period.  <br><br>Police departments across the nation are competing for qualified candidates. The hope is that these incentives will attract people to join the Phoenix Police Department. <br><br>“Our recruiting motto is, 'More than a career … it's a calling,' and that is true today, more than ever," said Phoenix Police Chief Jeri Williams. “We know there are men and women from diverse backgrounds with an intense desire to serve their community. This may be the added incentive they need to follow their dream."<br><br>Currently approximately 30% of current Phoenix Police officers are eligible for their 20-year retirement, but many will choose to stay. Over the past three fiscal years Phoenix Police has hired more than 360 officers to fill the openings left by attrition and vacancies still left unfilled by a six-year hiring freeze during the recession. The incentives will add to the push for the department to attract the best and most qualified candidates. <br><br>For more information or to apply, visit <a href="/police/joinphxpd" target="_blank">JoinPHXPD.com​</a>. <br><br> </html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeNewspolicePolice
Point Guard Points to Phoenix Police Activities League for Opportunity to Play College Basketball https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/2017Police8/7/2021 4:00:00 PMhttps://youtu.be/KAN8buqL2D0Point Guard Points to Phoenix Police Activities League for Opportunity to Play College Basketball <div class="ExternalClass5EF82362691B4F7CABE51DEC5BB916CF"><html> <p></p> <p> Kamari Webb is an incoming freshman at SAGU American Indian College, with a spot on the college's basketball team. It is an opportunity, he says, he wouldn't have if it weren't for PAL—the <a href="/police/polce-activities-league" target="_blank">Phoenix Police Activities League</a>. <br></p><p> "PAL was like my last breath of hope almost," Webb explained. "Coming out of Tolleson, we got a completely new coach my senior year, so I had no offers, and I felt I was definitely good enough to go play at the next level. But I just didn't have the opportunity or the exposure. So going to PAL...not only did they expand my game, but they just built me as a person."<br><br> PAL is a Phoenix Police initiative created to address the needs of at-risk youth, and build relationships between those youth and the police, in a non-enforcement setting. The PAL Elite team, that Webb was a part of, is PAL's club basketball program—something that usually costs kids thousands of dollars, but is free thanks to <a href="https://phoenixpolicefoundation.org/" target="_blank">Phoenix Police Foundation</a> funding.<br><br>"It's beyond what I imagined when we started the program three years ago," Officer Carl Wunsch said. "It was just gonna be a team, and we were just going to go into tournaments, not recognizing the community's desire to have this."<br><br> Officer Wunsch oversees PAL, and in his three years here, he's seen 18 of his athletes get the chance to participate in college sports. And, in just the past year, he's seen 11 guys get athletic scholarship offers. But Officer Wunsch says the benefits of PAL don't stop there. <br><br>"There is a widening gap between police, and community, and understanding each other, and what each other's about," Officer Wunsch said. "I think that this is a key piece to creating that bridge. Just the number of people I come into contact with that don't like the police. Now they're like well maybe the police are ok."<br><br>College starts this month for former PAL Elite player Webb, but he's already been practicing with his future teammates at SAGU. This point guard points to PAL not only for his spot to play at the college level, but also for his readiness to play, and he'd recommend this league for any other youth considering it. <br><br>"Especially with the way that it worked for me, I know that it could work like that for any other kid in The Valley that feels like they've been almost misunderstood or overlooked," Webb explained. "They could definitely come to PAL and look for an opportunity there, and I'm pretty sure they would have one."</p> </html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeVideopolicePolice
City Manager, Police Chief Commit to Fully Support USDOJ Investigationhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/2016Police8/5/2021 9:10:00 PMhttps://youtu.be/jvgZ4cuceNMCity Manager, Police Chief Commit to Fully Support USDOJ Investigation<div class="ExternalClass247E1612A1AF4A55A69BEC54552F1CA2"><html> <p></p>Phoenix Police Chief Jeri Williams promised to not only cooperate but embrace a federal investigation into the department's pattern or practices.<br><br>“I welcome this opportunity to make the Phoenix Police Department the best it can possibly be," said Williams. “I embrace reform. I embrace what we've learned from past independent reviews of our policies and practices. These are priorities I've demanded during my time as chief and continue to demand moving forward."<br><br>The Department of Justice announced Thursday morning plans to use one of its tools to ensure lawful and fair policing known as a Civil Pattern or Practice Investigation.  The Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division has done this in communities across the county including Los Angeles, Chicago, Washington, D.C., New Orleans, Seattle, and Portland.  The Phoenix Police Department is the second Arizona agency to participate.  An investigation was launched into the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office in 2009. <br><br>“I have said before public trust is essential for effective policing," said Williams in a news conference Thursday afternoon.  “Public safety requires trust.  Good officers welcome accountability because accountability is an essential part of building trust.  We know trust must be earned and it's earned one-on-one, every day, in every interaction our officers have with members of the community."<br><br>The investigation will consider elements such as stops, searches, arrests, and use of force.  It will also evaluate police response to public demonstrations as well as interaction with individuals with behavioral health challenges or those experiencing homelessness.<br><br>City Manager Ed Zuercher called the investigation an opportunity to continue the commitment to make the Phoenix Police Department stronger.  “We embrace opportunities for reform and improvement. Under the direction of the Mayor and City Council, we've sought out independent assessments of the Phoenix Police Department," Zuercher said.  “The DOJ investigation provides one more avenue toward making Phoenix a safer, stronger place for all residents, workers and visitors and our officers."<br><br>Mr. Zuercher also referenced the DOJ news conference where Attorney General Merrick Garland pointed out the challenges faced by cities across the country where police by default end up as the primary response for those experiencing a mental or behavioral health crisis or homelessness.  The city of Phoenix has committed $15 million in the new budget for the Community Assistance Program (CAP) where specially trained experts provide services to those in crisis.  “The city of Phoenix is committed to reforms such as CAP that make our city stronger."<br><br><p>Zuercher concluded the news conference affirming his commitment to the investigation and the police department.  “I'm confident under the leadership of Chief Jeri Williams, the Phoenix Police Department can and will continue to do better for the residents of Phoenix."  <br></p></html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeVideopolicePolice
Eleven-Year-Old Meets 911 Operator She Texted With to Save Her Family https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/2008Police8/4/2021 4:00:00 PMhttps://youtu.be/Tzv6IEzUNJ4Eleven-Year-Old Meets 911 Operator She Texted With to Save Her Family <div class="ExternalClass6F2E1AA0129449C1816B82A9186961E2"><html> <p> Eleven-year-old Elizabeth hugs communications dispatcher and 911 operator Christy Sisel inside the Phoenix Police Communications Bureau. This is the first time these two have met in person, but not the first time they've communicated. </p> <p>"I'm really grateful for what she did," Elizabeth said. "And it was nice meeting her." </p> <p>Christy was the operator on the other end of the phone when Elizabeth texted 911 in a family emergency. <br></p> <p>"Anxiety was racing through me," Elizabeth explained. "I felt...I felt nervous. That's for sure. I was also angry."</p> <p>"She was so young," Christy said of Elizabeth. "And she had so many lives in her poor little hand that she was wanting to save. And she just knew what to do."<br></p> <p>Out of respect for Elizabeth and her family, we are keeping specific details of the emergency private, but the outcome of this exchange is important to share. In a matter of minutes, Christy was able to get enough information over text to get officers out to Elizabeth and her family, and get them all to safety. </p> <p>"She's brave," Christy said. "Just so brave. To be 11 years old, and unfortunately to be put in a situation that she was in, and to know what to do."</p> <p> <a href="/policesite/Pages/Text-to-9-1-1.aspx" target="_blank">Texting 911 in an emergency is always an option​</a>, especially if you are in a situation like Elizabeth was, where she felt it was unsafe to talk. Just like calling 911, operators monitor texts around the clock. To text 911, simply start a text message, and enter 911 as the recipient.</p> <p>"I've been doing this for 17 years, and never have I met anybody on the other end of the phone," Christy said. "To put a voice and a face to it...it meant a lot. I know that she's safe and I couldn't be more proud of her at 11 years old to know to text 911."<br></p> </html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeVideopolicePolice
Critical Incident Briefing: July 20, 2021 30th Street & Roosevelt Street https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/2006Police8/3/2021 10:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2006/OISTwitter.pnghttps://youtu.be/_zbfaGfG898Critical Incident Briefing: July 20, 2021 30th Street & Roosevelt Street <div class="ExternalClass340C01AFA0A64536BFE86912E91B7FE7"><html> <strong>WARNING: The attached video may contain strong language as well as graphic images which may be disturbing to some people. Viewer discretion is advised.</strong> <br><br>The Phoenix Police Department released a Critical Incident Briefing (CIB) video that includes audio, visuals and information related to an officer-involved shooting (OIS) which occurred on July 20, 2021 in the area of 30th Street and Roosevelt Street.<br><br>This incident started around 7:15 p.m., when Officers from the Mountain View Precinct were dispatched to a domestic violence fight at an apartment.<br><br>The female caller told 911 that her husband (later identified as 31-year-old Miguel Hernandez) hit her, and he was holding a knife. The dispatcher could hear a child crying in the background. At one point during the almost 15-minute call, the victim stops speaking to the dispatcher, but stays on the line.<br><br>Two officers arrived at the apartment complex and located the victim standing outside in the parking lot. The victim was crying and visibly upset.<br><br>While one officer spoke with the victim, the second officer walked toward the apartment. Within seconds, Hernandez abruptly opened the door and advanced toward the officer, armed with a knife. The officer told Hernandez to show his hands. But Hernandez did not respond to the command.<br><br>Hernandez continued toward the officer with the knife, and that is when the officer fired at Hernandez.<br><br>After the shooting, additional officers arrived and because the suspect's hands could not be seen, the officers did not immediately approach Hernandez. Officers told the suspect to show them his hands and after seeing that he had no other weapons they approached him and began medical aid. <br><br>After the shooting, the officer walked the victim back to her apartment and verified that the children were safe. <br><br>Officers saw minor injuries on the victim, which, according to the victim, were caused by Hernandez.<br><br>The knife that Hernandez had armed himself with was found on the walkway were the shooting occurred. <br><br>The officer involved in this shooting is assigned to the Mountain View Precinct, Patrol Division and has more than 3 years of service.<br><br>There were no injuries to officers or other community members.<br> <br>Conclusions about whether the actions of the officers are consistent with department policy and the law will not be made until all facts are known and the investigation is complete. An internal investigation by the Professional Standard Bureau is currently underway, in addition to a criminal investigation. Once the criminal investigation is complete it will then be reviewed by the Maricopa County Attorney's Office.<br> <br>Public records law required redaction of certain personal identifying information before video is released publicly. This is why you may see some parts of Body Worn Camera (BWC) blurred or covered with a black box. Redacted video is released to local media in conjunction with the release of this Critical Incident Briefing for independent review and publication. Complete, unedited versions of the BWC are released to attorneys and the courts as evidence in a criminal case.<br> </html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeVideopolicePolice
Phoenix Police Officer Gets Pieces of Mangled Patrol Car After Near-fatal Crashhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/2003Police7/29/2021 11:00:00 PMhttps://youtu.be/GnHJT_sYLJ0Phoenix Police Officer Gets Pieces of Mangled Patrol Car After Near-fatal Crash<div class="ExternalClassD925AF92D9AA4911B0569AC83C135E97"><html> <p> ​Phoenix Police Officer Chase McCance is back at his precinct for the first time in a long time. He is back to receive a plaque from his squad with the license plate and keys to the patrol car he was driving the morning of January 1st, when a wrong-way driver crashed into him on duty, nearly taking his life.</p><p>"I don't remember most of the first couple days in the hospital," Officer McCance said. "But from hearing everybody talk, there was a good five, six hour period right at the beginning that I was bleeding internally. They didn't know what was going on. A nd at the end of the day, my wife signed a piece of paper saying 'go in, cut him open, and find what's wrong, and save him.'"<br><br>Officer McCance spent the following weeks in the hospital—healing fractures in his face, and broken bones all over his body. All of this happened during a global pandemic, preventing his young son and pregnant wife from visiting him. <br><br>"My first physical therapy session at the hospital, I think it was like day two or three, my whole goal was to sit six inches forward in a chair," Officer McCance explained. "So, go from sitting back in a chair to sitting forward, and it was excruciating. It was the hardest thing I thought I'd ever done physically in my life."​<br><br>In early February, doctors released Officer McCance, but the healing was far from over. Officer McCance has continued intensive therapy every single day so that he could walk back into his old precinct on this day, and receive the reminder of the trials, but also the triumphs, of these past several months. <br><br>"I've seen so many different things go badly, and this is something that's gone well, and it needs to be celebrated," Lt. William Jou said. "He is a miracle that he is here with us."<br><br>Lt. Jou, who oversees this squad, said that during his rehabilitation, Officer McCance asked to see his patrol car to help piece together parts of the story he does not remember. That visit inspired the plaque with pieces of the car.<br><br>"He wants to remember it because I think it inspires him to keep going, and him being that way inspires all of us to do what we do," Lt. Jou said.<br> Officer McCance has come back to work on light duty with an assignment in the department's Crime Gun Intelligence Unit. He says he'll be back on the streets, full duty, no later than this fall. <br><br>"It's a privilege for us to go out there, and be with people on the hardest days of their life," Officer McCance said. "So after going through what has been the hardest time of my life, I really look forward to coming back, and getting out, and being able to help the community again."​</p> </html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeVideopolicePolice

 

 

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