​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

 

 

Before the Badge: Cmdr. Ed DeCastro, Middle School Teacherhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/1844Police4/5/2021 12:00:00 AMhttps://youtu.be/tCsjJMJfFEQBefore the Badge: Cmdr. Ed DeCastro, Middle School Teacher<div class="ExternalClass2FAFC844163047CB9F9BC0EAF1ECB360"><html> <p> <em>Phoenix Police officers come from many different backgrounds, including different careers. The department's video series, ‘</em><a href="https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFNuct3MvVGa0aB67cIDS6PG4dPM9eNvE" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?q=https://youtube.com/playlist?list%3DPLFNuct3MvVGa0aB67cIDS6PG4dPM9eNvE&source=gmail&ust=1617723891922000&usg=AFQjCNFl3fX2poTfusd4nc53rwI8L74O2A"><em>Before the Badge</em></a><em>,’ is profiling some of those careers, and the diversity they bring to the department today.</em> <br> </p> <p>The leader of the Phoenix Police Department's Violent Crimes Bureau hasn't always had his eye on policework. In fact, he started his professional career as a teacher. <br></p> <p>Born in Florida, Commander Ed DeCastro grew up in MIami, and went to Florida State to get his bachelors in math education. A couple years after college, he moved his life to Phoenix. </p> <p>"I legitimately just wanted to move," Commander DeCastro recalled. "I had no job or anything. So I came out here and I figured oh I'm a teacher, I'll get a job easily. And it actually worked out."<br></p> <p>In 1996, Decastro started at Isaac Middle School as a sixth grade, bilingual science and math teacher. He went on to spend four years there, teaching and helping with extracurricular activities like student council and softball. <br></p> <p>But around the fourth year of teaching, he said he became disheartened with the job. That is when a chance friendship developed. <br></p> <p>"The school resource officer at the time, Steve Scott, we became good friends," the commander said. "And so we would go out to lunch, and talk, and I was kind of venting about how I was feeling. And he said, 'you know what, I think you'd be a really good cop.'"<br></p> <p>The very next day, DeCastro said Officer Scott had a Phoenix Police officer application on his desk. Three months later, Decastro had his date to go to the academy, and resigned from teaching.  <br></p> <p>"I wanted to be a teacher because I wanted to, I wanted to help the community, I wanted to help kids," DeCastro explained. "My thought process was, well this is just a different way to help the community."<br></p> <p>Since graduating from the academy, DeCastro has moved his way up the ranks to commander of the department's Violent Crimes Bureau, where he deals with all violent crime in Phoenix. One might not immediately see the connection between teaching and policing, but Commander DeCastro said his career before the badge taught him skills that help him lead this bureau today. <br></p> <p>​"You have to be organized," Commander DeCastro said of the similarity between jobs. "You have to kind of know what you're going into and how to do things. Otherwise, it becomes way too overwhelming. You definitely have to be flexible. So, things change here quickly, so you have to be able to adjust. And then just being creative. I think sometimes we get so stuck in the box of 'this is how we've always done it, and we're not going to change,' that sometimes, having a different perspective and just giving something new a try, and seeing how it works, is a better idea than just because that's how we've always done it."<br></p> </html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeVideopolicePolice
City of Phoenix Recruiting 911 Dispatchers, Pay Increase Coming Mid-Marchhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/1831Police3/23/2021 5:00:00 PMhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1i9zXAPg-ICity of Phoenix Recruiting 911 Dispatchers, Pay Increase Coming Mid-March<div class="ExternalClass4E618630C8A94C7DA0D2EF061A9DFBC7"><html>It is often in the worst moment of your life that you dial <a target="_blank">911</a> for help, assuming someone will be there for you on the other end of the line. That someone is a 911 dispatcher.  Now those dispatchers will be getting paid more for being the unseen heroes of emergency services.  <br><br>"There will always be crime unfortunately," Phoenix Police Communications Operator Sandra Ojeda said. "I feel good knowing I help people. I am a lifeline." <br><br>Finding the right people to be that lifeline, providing the critical link between residents and the help they need In the last year, has been challenging. <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span><img src="/policesite/MediaAssets/IMG_5289.jpg" style="margin:5px;width:183px;vertical-align:auto;float:right;" /><br><br>"I chose this profession mostly to help people," Rosenda Mendoza, a police communications operator with Phoenix, said. "I wanted a job where I can use my ability to speak Spanish, which comes in handy instead of using an interpreter." <br><br>But there is a shortage of dispatchers like Mendoza and Ojeda.  And the shortage isn't just in Arizona, it's part of a national trend.  In Phoenix there are 344 dispatcher positions in the police and fire department.  288 are current filled, meaning the city has 56 vacancies.  In an effort to fill those spots, the City of Phoenix has been evaluating recruiting efforts and pay for dispatchers. That review resulted in a pay increase of $3.10 per hour beginning March 8 for starting dispatchers. The Phoenix City Council will consider a proposal in April to increase the pay grades across of all levels of the public safety communications job series.<br><br>In addition to the upcoming pay increase, Phoenix dispatchers continue to have access to other benefits including tuition reimbursement up to $6,500 per fiscal year, the City of Phoenix retirement plan, and deferred compensation. Dispatchers complete a rigorous training program before they can begin serving the public, which is fully paid for as well.<br><br>Dispatchers are exposed to the community's worst moments, over and over, so mental health benefits are also a top priority. Phoenix dispatchers have a Quiet Room on site to decompress from calls. There is also an emotional support dog that roams the call center. <a target="_blank" href="/police/joinphxpd911/compensation-and-benefits">Read more about compensation and benefits here.</a><br><br>Dispatchers answer and direct emergency and non-emergency calls. They also dispatch officers to calls for service. In 2020, the City of Phoenix received nearly 1.2 million 911 calls, with 85% of them answered in 15 seconds or less. <br><br>If you are interested in a career with the City of Phoenix Communications Bureau, visit our <a target="_blank" href="/police/joinphxpd911">website</a> or call <a target="_blank">(602) 534-1301</a> to learn more and apply.<br></html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeVideopolicePolice
Critical Incident Briefing: Officer-involved Shooting Near 47th Avenue and Greenway Roadhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/1830Police3/22/2021 5:00:00 PMhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ct6sPK6FrjYCritical Incident Briefing: Officer-involved Shooting Near 47th Avenue and Greenway Road<div class="ExternalClass42010547C7CC41309B831480EB7D86DD"><html> <strong>WARNING: The attached video may contain strong language as well as graphic images which may be disturbing to some people. Viewer discretion is advised.</strong> <br> ​​<br>The Phoenix Police Department released a Critical Incident Briefing (CIB) video that includes audio, visuals and information related to an officer-involved shooting (OIS) which occurred on March 8, 2021 in the area of 47th Avenue and Greenway Road.​​​​   ​ ​​​​<br><br>This incident started around 2:00 p.m., when Community Action Officers from the Cactus Park Precinct were at a residence to help a couple with yard maintenance due to their bushes and trees being overgrown.<br><br>While speaking with the male homeowner outside, the suspect, later identified as 51-year-old Larissa Boulais, came out of the house onto the patio, armed with a gun. She then shot at officers and yelled at them as she retreated back into the house.<br><br>The officers were able to move the male homeowner to safety. Boulais then exited the residence a second time, this time near the garage, and pointed the gun at an officer. That officer fired his weapon at Boulais causing her to go back inside the home. She was not struck by the officer's gunfire.<br><br>Over the course of almost 7 and a half hours, officers from the Special Assignment Unit attempted to communicate with Boulais. They used several tools in an effort to have Boulais exit the house, including gas, less lethal munition, and communicating over a loudspeaker in an attempt to have Boulais exit the residence, but she refused.<br><br>Just before 10:00 p.m., officers, who were now inside the residence, were able to arrest Boulais inside of a bedroom with the assistance of gas and the less lethal rounds.<br><br>Boulais was transported to the hospital for injuries resulting from the less lethal rounds and gas. After she was released, she was booked for aggravated assault on a police officer, aggravated assault, weapons violations, and endangerment.<br><br>The officer involved in the shooting is assigned to the Cactus Park Precinct and has six years of service with the Phoenix Police Department.<br> <br>There were no injuries to officers or other community members.<br><br>Conclusions about whether the actions of the officers are consistent with department policy and the law will not be made until all facts are known and the investigation is complete. An internal investigation by the Professional Standard Bureau is currently underway, in addition to a criminal investigation. Once the criminal investigation is complete it will then be reviewed by the Maricopa County Attorney's Office.<br><br>Public records law required redaction of certain personal identifying information before video is released publicly. This is why you may see some parts of Body Worn Camera (BWC) blurred or covered with a black box. Redacted video is released to local media in conjunction with the release of this Critical Incident Briefing for independent review and publication. Complete, unedited versions of the BWC are released to attorneys and the courts as evidence in a criminal case.<br></html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeVideopolicePolice
Before the Badge: Officer Tresea Aberra, Crime Lab Techhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/1829Police3/22/2021 12:00:00 AMhttps://youtu.be/xsk9JimsykUBefore the Badge: Officer Tresea Aberra, Crime Lab Tech<div class="ExternalClassB41037B1CA514901BED1AFFD4C2E694C"><html> <em>Phoenix Police officers come from many different backgrounds, including different careers. The department's video series, ‘ </em><a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?q=https://youtube.com/playlist?list%3DPLFNuct3MvVGa0aB67cIDS6PG4dPM9eNvE&source=gmail&ust=1615247774487000&usg=AFQjCNHeH9o6r88qbVZWncnjxAldUsqOEg" target="_blank" href="https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFNuct3MvVGa0aB67cIDS6PG4dPM9eNvE" rel="noopener noreferrer"><em> Before the Badge </em></a><em> ,’ is profiling some of those careers, and the diversity they bring to the department today. </em><br><br> Police work has not always been on Officer Tresea Aberra's radar. In fact, the first seven years of her career were spent in the Phoenix Crime Lab.  <br><br> "I, like many people, had a great interest in what happens in cri me scenes, or at police departments, or crime lab," Aberra explained. "So, I started to go to school for that." <br><br> She started with a degree in criminal justice, where she happened to meet a crime scene specialist. After learning about the lab, she became a volunteer in controlled substances. About a year into that, she applied for a full time job as a lab tech.  <br><br> "I was responsible for going down to get all the evidence that was being impounded from the streets," Aberra said. "I would bri ng it up to all the scientists. You are responsible for that chain of custody of coming from our property annex, to me, to a locker that we keep all of our evidence in that has to be tested. I made reagents for all the lab techs, I kept lab like spot plates and everything they needed stocked and ready to go."  <br><br> She says the experience exposed her to the drug side of crime, and that activated an interest in getting outside of the lab and onto the streets. <br><br> "There were so many things about the streets, and things that we see or we think we know about, meaning drug related, that I had no clue," Aberra said. From scientific terms, to what things can do to people, to what to watch out for."<br><br> And now, she brings that lab experience out to South Phoenix where she serves as a community action officer — that's a liaison between Phoenix Police and the community. <br><br> "Any team needs a good, diverse background," Aberra said. "People come from all different walks of life, and that's what makes a team so incredible. I have an extra little bit of education, or knowledge of something, where someone who's been on the streets for many more years, they could be the same age as me, younger, or older, has that extra edge that I just don't know yet that I could still learn. So, it's worked."<br> </html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeVideopolicePolice
Before the Badge: Lt. Lois Weiss, Personal Trainer and Bodybuilderhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/1793Police3/8/2021 12:00:00 AMhttps://youtu.be/5_WCEoC0s5EBefore the Badge: Lt. Lois Weiss, Personal Trainer and Bodybuilder<div class="ExternalClass4F7CE5D10DCF4EAF9CE1C5D91C4B4CB1"><html> <em>Phoenix Police officers come from many different backgrounds, including different careers. The department's video series, ‘</em><a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?q=https://youtube.com/playlist?list%3DPLFNuct3MvVGa0aB67cIDS6PG4dPM9eNvE&source=gmail&ust=1615247774487000&usg=AFQjCNHeH9o6r88qbVZWncnjxAldUsqOEg" target="_blank" href="https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFNuct3MvVGa0aB67cIDS6PG4dPM9eNvE" rel="noopener noreferrer"><em>Before the Badge</em></a><em>,’ is profiling some of those careers, and the diversity they bring to the department today.</em><br><br> Phoenix Police Lt. Lois Weiss climbs the stairs to her fourth floor office in downtown Phoenix. Rest assured, there's an elevator in the building, but she's into staying fit — she has been her whole life, so much so, that it was her first real career before ever entering law enforcement. <br><br> "Going into college, I needed to find a way to pay for things," Lt. Weiss explained. "As I was pursuing my bachelor's at the University of Illinois [at] Chicago — was pursuing that for criminal justice, I majored in that, I minored in political science. So during that time, personal training was a monetary benefit."<br><br> Lt. Weiss worked four years as a personal trainer at a health club in a suburb of Chicago. Personal training led her to the world of bodybuilding, and she eventually found herself in competitions. She said she walked away with a handful of trophies, and some invaluable life lessons, too.<br><br> "It taught you intestinal fortitude," Lt. Weiss said. "It taught you emotional equity, in any mission. It taught self preservation, self regulation, it also taught me how to work seamlessly with other people because it really put in the forefront of my mind, I can't go this alone." <br><br> Ultimately though, she said she did not see herself in personal training forever, and after graduating college, she returned to an interest she had as a little girl.  <br><br> "I wanted to go into law enforcement," Lt. Weiss said. "I just knew I did. Personal training wasn't going to ever allow me the conduit, or the way, to hold people accountable for horrible things that they did." <br><br> So, in her early 20s, she moved out west, and the rest, as they say, is history. Lt. Weiss has been with the Phoenix Police Department for 27 years. She has been in roles from financial crimes to homicide to undercover details, always keeping with her the strong mental and physical foundation from that first career. <br><br> Now as a leader of the department's Professional Standards Bureau, she cannot stress enough the benefits of a team with a diverse employment background like her own. <br><br> "I believe that diversity galvanizes the department," Lt. Weiss explained. "And this is going to set us up for longevity in this organization that I truly believe is the best organization in the country."<br> </html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeVideopolicePolice
Critical Incident Briefing: Officer-involved Shooting Near 43rd Avenue and Cactus Roadhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/1773Police2/22/2021 6:00:00 PMhttps://youtu.be/MfmifOYSHr8Critical Incident Briefing: Officer-involved Shooting Near 43rd Avenue and Cactus Road<div class="ExternalClass7C5382A348E24F5DA32DD4B8937937D8"><html> <strong>WARNING: The attached video may contain strong language as well as graphic images which may be disturbing to some people. Viewer discretion is advised.</strong> <br> <br>The Phoenix Police Department released a Critical Incident Briefing (CIB) video that includes audio, visuals and information related to an officer-involved shooting (OIS) which occurred on February 6, 2021 in the area of 43rd Avenue and Cactus Road.<br><br>This incident started just before noon when 911 received a call from a woman who said there was an unknown man in her backyard, and that he was armed. The suspect was later identified as 29-year-old Anthony Greco.<br><br>While the responding officers were on their way, they learned Greco was now inside of the home with the victim.<br><br>Once the officers were on scene, they were able to have the woman exit the home through a window to safety. After the victim was out of the home, the officers began working to establish communication with Greco, who was still inside of the home. Two officers positioned themselves to the rear of the home, behind the block wall around the backyard.<br><br>As more officers were arriving, Greco exited the rear arcadia door into the backyard. An officer could see Greco was still armed with a handgun, so he gave Greco commands to drop the gun. Greco refused, walked towards the officer and raised the firearm. On the body worn camera Greco can be heard saying “shoot me” just before the officer fired one round from his rifle, striking Greco.<br><br>After the shooting, officers moved to the backyard to contact Greco. The officers could not see the gun, which was positioned under Greco who was lying face down. Due to the proximity of Greco to his gun, the officers spent several minutes attempting to have Greco move away from it, using commands and less lethal bean bag rounds. As the officers moved in closer, they utilized two more bean bag rounds so that they can safely approach. When they reached Greco, they moved him away from his gun, and provided first aid. Greco was pronounced deceased on scene by the Phoenix Fire Department.<br><br>Officers later learned that two days prior to this incident, Greco kidnapped one of his family members at gunpoint and stole their vehicle and gun. The stolen vehicle, which Greco arrived in, was found parked in front of the victim’s residence. And the stolen gun which was used by Greco was recovered next to him.<br><br><br><br>There was one officer involved in the shooting. He is assigned to the Cactus Park Precinct, 39-years-old, and has three years of service with the Phoenix Police Department.<br><br>There were no injuries to officers or other community members.<br><br>Conclusions about whether the actions of the officers are consistent with department policy and the law will not be made until all facts are known and the investigation is complete. An internal investigation by the Professional Standard Bureau is currently underway, in addition to a criminal investigation. Once the criminal investigation is complete it will then be reviewed by the Maricopa County Attorney’s Office.<br><br>Public records law required redaction of certain personal identifying information before video is released publicly. This is why you may see some parts of Body Worn Camera (BWC) blurred or covered with a black box. Redacted video is released to local media in conjunction with the release of this Critical Incident Briefing for independent review and publication. Complete, unedited versions of the BWC are released to attorneys and the courts as evidence in a criminal case.<br></html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeVideopolicePolice
Before the Badge: Officer Deron Quint, Professional Hockey Playerhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/1771Police2/22/2021 12:00:00 AMhttps://youtu.be/_IvIl6xDWngBefore the Badge: Officer Deron Quint, Professional Hockey Player<div class="ExternalClassF9FBB4306235420E8267ADB5B7DBFD62"><html> <em>​Phoenix Police officers come from many different backgrounds, including different careers. The department's new video series, ‘</em><a href="https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFNuct3MvVGa0aB67cIDS6PG4dPM9eNvE" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" data-auth="NotApplicable"><em>Before the Badge</em></a><em>,’ is profiling some of those careers, and the diversity they bring to the department today. </em><br><br> ​You might recognize the name Deron Quint. He played professional hockey for 22 years — a defenseman for a number of teams from the Winnipeg Jets, to the Columbus Blue Jackets, to our very own Arizona Coyotes. He also played abroad in Italy, Germany, and Russia. But his love for the game started way back in childhood.<br><br> "My dad was a coach so I was on the ice when I was two, just following him around, and then it just grew from there," Quint said.<br><br> Quint grew up in Durham, New Hampsh​​ire where he was skating pretty much as soon as he was walking. In his early teens, he was playing with the college team in town. And by 18, he made his rookie debut with the Jets. It was that first year that he tied the NHL record for fastest two-goal span by one player, scoring twice in four seconds.<br><br> ​"Scored a goal on the power play, and then we won the face off and, you know, I wrapped it around the glass and it ended up hitting something on the glass, and ended up going in the net," Quint said. "It was one of those things that was real lucky." <br><br> Sure, we can call that luck, but as the saying goes, luck favors the prepared, and Quint has always come prepared. That was true in hockey. And now, that's true in the blue. <br><br> "You know I always wanted to be an officer," Quint explained. "Just something, I always looked up to them as a kid. We had a couple security officers, Jimmy O'Neil and Ray Rowe, that worked for the Phoenix Coyotes when the team came here, and I always sat with them and chatted with them, and talked to them about it. And really, it's just something I wanted to do. Just give back to the community, and help people." <br><br> Quint said he always knew that if his body held up through hockey, he wanted to become a cop in retirement. So, when he packed up his skates for the last time, he made his way to the Phoenix Police Academy, and started on the force in January of 2020.  <br><br> For Quint, the uniform may have changed, but the game remains the same.  <br><br> "As a defenseman, you kind of have to read what's going on out on the ice," Quint said. "You know, you always have to be aware of your surroundings and wh​​​at's going on, and you're kind of the brains back there where you're always thinking what's going to happen, what's going to go on next, and it's very similar on the streets, or when you go to a call, you gotta be aware of your surroundings." <br><br> He said trash-talking fans taught him focus, rowdy opponents taught him patience, and being part of a team taught him accountability. He has brought all these skill with him to the streets of Phoenix.<br><br> "It's just like when I was playing," Quint said. "I put the uniform on every night to be the best I can be, and to make the people around me better. You know, I feel the same way about this. I demand and expect a lot out of my squadmates​ because I believe we have a duty to be the best we can be every day."<br> </html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeVideopolicePolice
Before the Badge: Sgt. Troy Hillman, Certified Public Accountant https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/1768Police2/18/2021 11:00:00 PMhttps://youtu.be/G9GPhWgRk68Before the Badge: Sgt. Troy Hillman, Certified Public Accountant <div class="ExternalClass5D0114D8ED524368B5E7547004EAF580"><html> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span><em>Phoenix Police officers come from many different backgrounds, including different careers. The department's new video series, ‘</em><a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?q=https://youtube.com/playlist?list%3DPLFNuct3MvVGa0aB67cIDS6PG4dPM9eNvE&source=gmail&ust=1613752091217000&usg=AFQjCNGIEVIVAqYthuWPRs0lXSby2j5Eig" target="_blank" href="https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFNuct3MvVGa0aB67cIDS6PG4dPM9eNvE"><em>Before the Badge</em></a><em>,’ is profiling some of those careers, and the diversity they bring to the department today. </em><br><br>Sergeant Troy Hillman has been with the Phoenix Police Department for more than 20 years — a sergeant for 15 of those years. His path to this job is not a typical one, but he credits it for his skills in police work today. <br><br>"I was a CPA accountant," Sgt. Hillman explained. "I got a degree in accounting from University of Illinois, launched into the business world as an auditor. Ended up working for a big company in Chicago called PricewaterhouseCoopers."<br><br>Sgt. Hillman was a certified public accountant auditor, flying around the country, auditing small to midsize companies.<br><br>"It was kind of a blessing and a curse. I was really good at it but I didn't necessarily like it," the sergeant explained. "But I definitely like rules, and following the rules."<br><br>And that's where police work came in. After three years in the business world, Sgt. Hillman followed his affinity for rules right to the source of them — in law enforcement.<br><br>"I wanted to pursue, and chase, and use my problem solving analytical skills to chase bad guys. And also kind of give back to the community, and just help people."<br><br>So, at the age of 24, Sgt. Hillman packed up his life in Chicago and drove out to Arizona to attend the Phoenix Regional Police Academy. Once he had his uniform and badge, he started on the streets in South Phoenix. But, it didn't take long for his business roots to bubble back up.<br><br>"I always kind of wanted to explore the financial crimes — it was called document crimes at the time — as a detective, because I figured that would match with my skills as an auditor," Sgt. Hillman said.<br><br>From there, he promoted to sergeant, and not long after, found himself running the Cold Case Homicide Squad — each part of his professional career is seemingly unrelated, and yet, when he looks back now, it's all connected.<br><br>"Cold case for me was like a puzzle," Sgt. Hillman said. "Somebody else had already worked it, but I also, that kind of structure, that organizational, comes from the very depths of my accounting business education. Also you pour on the entrepreneurial companies I saw. The smaller businesses. And they're more of a get it done attitude. And I think I bring that to the forefront."<br><br>The Phoenix Police Department is a diverse group of public servants, and Sgt. Troy Hillman is one example of that. Many different people, with many different backgrounds, that make up the whole.<br></html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeVideopolicePolice

 

 

PolicePhoenixPolicehttps://phoenix.gov/policePolicepolicePolicehttps://www.youtube.com/user/phxpdhttps://nextdoor.com/agency-detail/az/phoenix/city-of-phoenixphoenixpolicedepartmentphoenixazpoliceTwitter

 

 

COVID-19 Testinghttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/AdBox/DispForm.aspx?ID=19https://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/AdBox/Attachments/19/Virus_Slider_Public_testingB.pngCOVID-19 Testing<div class="ExternalClass9084C8DD45B84256A8E5DBBB547B1775"><html>Learn about COVID-19 Testing with no out-of-pocket costs.<br></html></div>Newshttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/em-and-hs/15613/25/2021 8:47:20 PM9/25/2021 8:47:20 PM

​Share this pageArchived Press Releases