​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ Environmental Sustainability Goals - Becoming a Carbon Neutral City Operating on 100 percent clean energy  ​​​​​


 

 

Register: Killer Heat in COVID Timeshttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/environmental-programs/1460Environment & Sustainability8/18/2020 9:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1460/Newsroom_Environment_018.jpgRegister: Killer Heat in COVID Times<div class="ExternalClass9EB03C388C714E4F82FBD8B2F89FD7E0"><html> <p>​Last month, Phoenix broke its record for the most days at 110-plus degrees, while being the world's hotspot for coronavirus. This case critical discussion brings together ASU, the city of Phoenix, as well as a local nonprofit and a national NGO, to discuss the compounding crises of extreme heat and COVID-19.</p> <p> <strong>Ariane Middel, Moderator</strong> <br>Senior Sustainability Scientist, ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability and Innovation</p><p><strong>Juan Declet-Barreto</strong><br>Climate Vulnerability Social Scientist, Union of Concerned Scientists</p><p><strong>Mark Hartman</strong><br>Chief Sustainability Officer, City of Phoenix</p><p><strong>Masavi Parea</strong><br>Coalitions and Trainings Director, CHISPA Arizona</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Thursday, Sept. 3, 2020</strong> <br>2 - 3 p.m.</li> </ul> <p>Co-hosted by ASU's <a target="_blank" href="https://sustainability.asu.edu/hue/">HUE (Healthy Urban Environment) </a>initiative.</p> <p>Register via <a target="_blank" href="https://asu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ZDulPDrRQz6IiiS7cRNFAQ">Zoom</a> </p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/oepNewsenvironmental-programs
Climate Act​ion Plan Survey - PHXTV Virtual Reportinghttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/environmental-programs/1422Environment & Sustainability7/24/2020 3:00:00 PMhttps://youtu.be/lbUQrovO9uYClimate Act​ion Plan Survey - PHXTV Virtual Reporting<div class="ExternalClassCC607FC66FAA4BDE9D6DF6F079D98FD4"><html> <p>​​The city of Phoenix is asking for your help. The Office of Environmental Programs is looking for ideas to improve air quality and reduce our carbon footprint. Environmental Programs Coordinator Rosanne Albright tell us how you can help.</p><p>Learn more about the work the city is doing and find the survey at <a href="/oep/climate" target="_blank">https://www.phoenix.gov/oep/climate</a>.</p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/oepVideoenvironmental-programs
Phoenix Tests Use of Cool Pavement to Mitigate Heat Island Effecthttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/environmental-programs/1392Environment & Sustainability7/9/2020 7:00:00 AMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1392/Newsroom_Environment_017.jpgPhoenix Tests Use of Cool Pavement to Mitigate Heat Island Effect<div class="ExternalClassDCF23B26A9AB4865874C20A671889180"><html> <p>​Something really ‘cool’ is happening in Phoenix…literally! The City of Phoenix Street Transportation Department is launching a pilot study to evaluate cool pavement treatment.</p> <p>Asphalt collects and retains heat during the day and releases it slowly at night. Phoenix is among several cities that are experiencing the urban ‘heat island’ effect due to the retention of heat within the built environment. US Environmental Protection Agency data shows the difference in nighttime temperatures in heat island areas can be as much as 22 degrees hotter than temperatures measured outside the heat island. Higher nighttime temperatures lead to more energy consumption, more greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution and other harmful effects.</p> <p>Cool pavement is lighter in color than traditional asphalt or other seal coatings. Cool pavement reflects back the sunlight that hits it. Because the surface reflects, rather than retains heat, cool pavement has the potential to offset rising nighttime temperatures in Phoenix. It should also help cool neighborhood areas that don’t have much shade from the sun.</p> <p>Cool pavement is not a paint treatment. It is a water-based asphalt sealant that is applied on top of the existing asphalt pavement. It's made with asphalt, water, an emulsifying agent (soap), mineral fillers, polymers and recycled materials. It contains no harmful chemicals and bonds with the asphalt layer underneath.</p> <p> <img src="/streetssite/MediaAssets/Cool_Pavement_04_72DPI.jpg" alt="Side-by-side temperature readings" style="width:250px;vertical-align:auto;float:right;" />University researchers will be taking measurements and collecting data over several years to evaluate the results and determine if cool pavement helps mitigate the heat island effect and if those effects are sustainable over time.</p> <p>Because the Phoenix area climate is unlike other major cities, the study team will also assess how the material holds up against 300 days of sunshine, monsoon storms, high temperatures and daily traffic.</p> <p>Esteban Park at 32nd Street and Roeser Road was the first site to receive cool pavement treatment. Eight other locations where streets were in good condition but were due for a surface treatment were selected in consultation with the Mayor and Council offices.</p> <p>To learn more about cool pavement, please phoenix.gov/streets/coolpavement.</p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/oepNewsenvironmental-programs
Let’s Breathe Clean Air!https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/environmental-programs/1373Environment & Sustainability7/1/2020 10:30:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1373/Newsroom_Environment_016.jpgLet’s Breathe Clean Air!<div class="ExternalClassB83D5023C78244E79C844E31EBC94DEC"><html> <p>The city of Phoenix is currently seeking the community's ideas and comments on potential actions to improve air quality and reduce its carbon footprint.</p> <p>Here is something that might surprise you: the city could, with help from the community, reduce greenhouse gas emissions community-wide by as much as 30 percent by the year 2025.</p> <p>We would like to hear your thoughts on how to get there! You can learn more about the work the city is doing and find the survey at <a href="/oep/climate" target="_blank">https://www.phoenix.gov/oep/climate</a>.</p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/oepNewsenvironmental-programs
Phoenix Continues to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissionshttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/environmental-programs/1330Environment & Sustainability6/10/2020 4:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1330/Newsroom_Environment_015.jpgPhoenix Continues to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions<div class="ExternalClass6EC7A180506548C48A418BB87F952591"><html> <p>​<span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span>A progress report conducted by the city of Phoenix and Arizona State University shows that the city once again met its goal by achieving a 15.4 percent reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from city operations from 2005 to 2018.</p> <p>“Despite being the fastest growing city in the nation Phoenix has seen emission reductions due to our city’s proactive environmental planning measures,” said Mayor Kate Gallego. “COVID-19 has further illuminated the link between public health and the environment. Investments in clean energy technologies and emissions mitigation can assist in our recovery and make us one of the most dynamic economies in the country.”</p> <p>The most significant GHG reduction measures implemented by the city include: advanced methane capture systems at city-owned landfills; increased transition to alternative fuels; completed installation of energy-efficient streetlights and traffic signals; additional solar power projects; increased waste diversion rates, including the construction of a compost facility; and the continued construction of the PHX Sky Train.  </p> <p>The decrease in emissions is also attributed to efforts by Salt River Project and Arizona Public Service to use alternative energy sources to produce power purchased by the city.</p> <p>A community-scale GHG emissions inventory was also completed for 2018. The results show that GHG emissions on a community-scale were 0.5 percent lower than in 2012. GHG emissions decreased during a period where the city’s population grew 12 percent. </p> <p>The city’s goal is to reduce GHG emissions by 40 percent from city operations and 30 percent community wide by 2025.</p> <p>The next important step is to involve all city departments and the community in developing an updated Climate Action Plan for Council consideration this fall that will highlight the actions necessary to achieve these future goals. An online survey later this month will give Phoenix residents the opportunity to express their concerns and needs in relation to climate change.   </p> <p>For more specific details, visit <a href="/oep/2018GHG" target="_blank">https://www.phoenix.gov/oep/2018GHG</a>.<span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/oepNewsenvironmental-programs
Phoenix Receives $1.4 Million in Brownfields Grants to Revitalize Communitieshttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/environmental-programs/1204Environment & Sustainability5/6/2020 5:00:00 PMhttps://youtu.be/EK050N3N8EwPhoenix Receives $1.4 Million in Brownfields Grants to Revitalize Communities<div class="ExternalClass501A0CA0B3B0417C8D2E2CF6211F8D30"><html> <p>At a press conference today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Southwest Region Administrator John Busterud announced that the city of Phoenix is receiving two brownfields grants totaling $1.4 million. </p> <p>"Phoenix’s Brownfields Program is poised to continue to boost our economy with these $1.4 million grants from EPA," said Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego. "The two grants allow us to address environmentally-challenged properties for the Rio Reimagined Project and provide low-interest rate loans for developers, businesses and nonprofits for cleanup of sites citywide."</p> <p>Through the <strong>Brownfields Communitywide Assessment Coalition Grant</strong> for $600,000, the city of Phoenix will lead a collaborative effort with the cities of Avondale and Tempe, and Arizona State University to assess, in each city, the area within one mile on either side of the 45-mile stretch of the Salt River (Rio Salado), Agua Fria and Gila rivers for potential brownfield properties. This project builds on previous EPA brownfields grants and work within the Rio Reimagined Urban Waters project area.</p> <p>The city is also receiving a <strong>Brownfields Cleanup Revolving Loan Fund </strong>for $800,000 to clean up brownfield properties and work with local grassroots groups, developers and government agencies to finance brownfields cleanup projects to help Phoenix become a sustainable, connected and smart desert city. Local Initiatives Support Corporation Phoenix is a partner in this grant and will be providing services as the financial manager. Their expertise in community development and management of loan and grant funds will be beneficial. This award leverages other investments to spur economic and community development.</p> <p>A brownfield is a property for which the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant. The Phoenix Brownfields Land Recycling Programs initiated in 1997, has cleaned up and put back into use, 310 acres of previously contaminated land, created or maintained over 3,300 jobs, and brought $312 million in private investment to the city.  </p> <p>To learn more about the city’s Brownfields Program, visit <a href="/oep/brownfields-about" target="_blank">https://www.phoenix.gov/oep/brownfields-about</a>.</p> <p>For more information about EPA’s Brownfields Program, visit <a href="https://www.epa.gov/brownfields" target="_blank">https://www.epa.gov/brownfields</a>.<br></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/oepVideoenvironmental-programs

​ ​

 Check us out!

Green Bond Framework

The city released a Green Bond Framework to attract “Impact Investors” interested in directing their investments toward sustainability-related projects in exchange for attractive financing terms.  The City is hoping to release a new sustainability bond offering in 2020.

Sustainability Challenge ​

PUHSD Student Council Sustainability Officers

Green Games 2020

Hey, we’re on TV:

Check out the latest TV coverage of sustainability in Phoenix. 

You can watch the full 11 minute video, or just check out the short clips about each of our sustainability actions:

Becoming a Carbon Neutral City Full Vide​​o (11 Mins.)​

 

​ 

Environmental Sustainability Goals Intro (2:17 Min.)

Buildings and Land Use (1:54 Mins.)

Transportation (1:04 Mins.)

Zero Waste (1:05 Mins.)

Water (1:25 Mins.)

Parks and Open Space (1:25 Mins.)

Clean Air (1:34 Mins.)

Food Systems (:50 Mins)

Environmental Sustainability Goals Close (:24 Mins.)

 ​