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A coordinated response for neig​hborhoods and individuals experiencing homelessness—​ offering education, resources, and encampment cleanups. ​

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 PHX C.A.R.E.S. at Work

 

 

WORKING TOGETHER1744https://www.phoenix.gov/Media Assets/Sliders/Photos - COVID - Convention Center - PHXCares_0089.JPGWORKING TOGETHERhttps://www.phoenix.gov/nsd/programs/cleanups-and-tool-lendinghttps://www.phoenix.gov/Media Assets/Forms/DispForm.aspx?ID=1744 From connecting neighbors for community meetings, to organizing neighborhood cleanups, there is help to beautify your neighborhoods, and to increase the sense of community. ​​ <div class="ExternalClass2D4C5052BFC242809B94257DAC530CBE"><p>From connecting neighbors for community meetings, to organizing neighborhood cleanups, there is help to beautify your neighborhoods, and to increase the sense of community. ​​<br></p></div>0x0101009148F5A04DDD49CBA7127AADA5FB792B00AADE34325A8B49CDA8BB4DB53328F214007F80A03ACE71234A93E8BBD7B87318C1Image
HOW IT WORKS1745https://www.phoenix.gov/Media Assets/Sliders/cass outreach 2.6.2020.jpgHOW IT WORKShttps://www.phoenix.gov/humanservicessite/Documents/How%20It%20Works.pdfhttps://www.phoenix.gov/Media Assets/Forms/DispForm.aspx?ID=1745 ​​​PHX C.A.R.E.S. is a coordinated response for neighborhoods and individuals experiencing homelessness—offering education, resources, and encampment cleanups. ​ <div class="ExternalClass6E1D8A3FB856472B8E63D6D8FE9B8C2A"><p>​​​PHX C.A.R.E.S. is a coordinated response for neighborhoods and individuals experiencing homelessness—offering education, resources, and encampment cleanups. ​<br></p></div>0x0101009148F5A04DDD49CBA7127AADA5FB792B00AADE34325A8B49CDA8BB4DB53328F214007F80A03ACE71234A93E8BBD7B87318C1Image

 

 

Phoenix Offers Free Tax Preparation and Filing Servicehttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/human-services/297Human Services1/19/2018 7:00:00 AMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/297/Newsroom_HSD_004.jpgPhoenix Offers Free Tax Preparation and Filing Service<div class="ExternalClassF5C5DDED11D848358B1687190A62A109"><html> <div> <span style="font-size:13.3333px;">Each tax season, the city of Phoenix's Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) campaign helps working families with free tax preparation and filing services. Preparation and filing assistance for families who earned less than $54,000 in 2017 is now available. </span> </div> <div><span style="font-size:13.3333px;"><br></span></div> <div><span style="font-size:13.3333px;">Seventeen primary sites, located in Phoenix, are offering free tax preparation and filing services from Monday, January 20 though Tuesday, April 17, including Saturdays. A list of Phoenix sites, with hours and days of operation, is available at phoenix.gov/eitc. It is important to note that hours and days of operation vary for different locations.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:13.3333px;"><br></span></div> <div><span style="font-size:13.3333px;">Individuals and families may qualify and file for the child tax credit, dependent care credit, the education tax credit and EITC up to $6,318 at the city's free tax preparation sites.  </span></div> <div><span style="font-size:13.3333px;"><br></span></div> <div><span style="font-size:13.3333px;">For information about the city of Phoenix EITC program and what documents to bring, visit phoenix.gov/eitc.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:13.3333px;"><br></span></div> <div><span style="font-size:13.3333px;">For more information about Valley wide EITC site locations and hours of operation, call the Internal Revenue Service at 1-800-906-9887 or visit irs.treasury.gov/freetaxprep.</span></div> <p><br></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/humanservicesNewshuman-services
City Rolls Out Mobile Career Unit (MCU) for Community Feedbackhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/human-services/2122Human Services10/29/2021 12:00:00 AMhttps://youtu.be/IhIFDTWY-gECity Rolls Out Mobile Career Unit (MCU) for Community Feedback<div class="ExternalClass82E92FD1CD184ECA80E10B725AA61F53"><html> <p> When you think of a bus, you probably think transportation—getting people to their desired destinations. Well, the city of Phoenix is hoping this bus will get people to their desired destinations…in their careers. <br></p> <p>"We’re really hoping people find their dream jobs at a mobile career van," Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego said. <br></p> <p>The Mobile Career Unit, or MCU, is the city’s submission in the <a href="https://bloombergcities.jhu.edu/mayors-challenge" target="_blank">2021 Bloomberg Philanthropies Global Mayors Challenge</a>. The MCU's goal is to connect employers to job seekers, right in their communities, making jobs accessible in every corner of our city. <br></p> <p>"We learned during COVID, when we sent out vans to do testing, that there are many people who really appreciated being at their church, their kids school, in their local library," Mayor Gallego said. "We’re doing the same thing with jobs."<br></p> <p>The MCU has been spotted in parking lots from Food City to the Burton Bar Central Library. Job seeker walk up, and are helped through the application process, then step inside the MCU for an interview with an employer. Several job seekers have been hired right on the spot! </p> <p>The MCU is in the testing phase, and the city is encouraging the community to try it out and tell us what you think. Mayor Gallego stopped by to check it out. </p> <p>"I just got to sit down with the Renaissance Hotel, which is interviewing people today," Mayor Gallego explained. "We have this great screen, where it feels like you’re in the office. So many people are in transition now, and it’s my hope as mayor that people will get a chance to be in jobs that are incredibly fulfilling."<br></p> <p>And that brings us back to the core of the Global Mayors Challenge—a challenge to cities to think about how we will come out of this pandemic, and what needs will be the greatest. More than 600 cities entered the challenge this year, and Phoenix has made it to the Champion Cities finalist phase. If the mobile career unit is chosen as a winner, the city will get up to one million dollars to keep the MCU rolling. </p> <p>"Phoenix, along with the 49 other finalist cities, have already proven that their ideas are tackling some of the most pressing issues facing cities around the world," Andrea Coleman, from Bloomberg Philantrhopies, said. "Phoenix in particular, trying to help get their residents back to work—this is something that is a top priority for mayors around the world." </p> <p>You can learn more about the mobile career unit, and how you can try it out for yourself, <a href="/mayor/challenge" target="_blank">on our website here</a>. <br></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/humanservicesVideohuman-services
City Adds Shelter Beds, Invests in Solutions for Homelessness https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/human-services/1742Human Services2/4/2021 4:15:00 AMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1742/Newsroom_HSD_0016.jpgCity Adds Shelter Beds, Invests in Solutions for Homelessness <div class="ExternalClassA5B9D9B596B84CD2B7BD2F27818C59AD"><html> The City of Phoenix is investing millions of dollars to meet the needs of those in our community experiencing homelessness. This includes efforts to not only assist those currently lacking shelter, but also those struggling to stay in their homes as the city works to provide more affordable housing options.<br><br>The city has committed $20 million from the 2020-2021 fiscal budget and more than $150 million in federal grant funding to these issues.  The money is used to help thousands of Phoenicians find shelter, work and long-term solutions to the challenges of homelessness.<br><br>Maricopa County is home to nearly 7,500 individuals experiencing homelessness.  More than half of those people lack adequate shelter, and that number is growing steadily.  While this is a problem throughout the county and state, homelessness is principally addressed in the city of Phoenix and with local non-profit partners.  There are approximately 1,800 shelter beds available in Maricopa County.  83% of those are in the city of Phoenix.<br><br>Here is a look at how the city budget and federal grants are being used in our community.<br><br><strong>COUNCIL APPROVES MORE BEDS</strong><br><br>During the Phoenix City Council meeting on Wednesday, the council voted to add hundreds of additional beds to the Human Services Campus near 13th Ave & Madison in downtown Phoenix.  The newly approved expansion will provide an additional 275 beds, bringing the total to 1,788.<br><br><strong>HOUSING AND SHELTER PARTNERSHIPS</strong><br><br>The city of Phoenix relies on community partners who are dedicated to providing shelter, food and support services for individuals in the community experiencing homelessness.  This includes organizations such as United Methodist Outreach (<a href="https://umom.org/" target="_blank">UMOM</a>), <a href="https://cplc.org/" target="_blank">Chicanos Por La Causa</a>, <a href="https://www.cassaz.org/" target="_blank">Central Arizona Shelter Services (CASS</a>),  <a href="https://www.nativeconnections.org/youth-services" target="_blank">Native American Connections</a>, <a href="https://communitybridgesaz.org/" target="_blank">Community Bridges</a> and <a href="https://www.sbhservices.org/" target="_blank">Southwest Behavioral Health Services</a>. Grants are provided to these organizations from both city and federal funds to support their community efforts.<br><br><img style="width:406px;" alt="" src="file:///C:/Users/077882/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image002.jpg" /><strong>SUMMER HEAT RELIEF</strong><br><br>The city used the Phoenix Convention Center during the hottest months of the year to set up a Heat Relief Respite center.  Buses took individuals from the area surrounding the Human Services Campus to the site, providing a reprieve from the heat for more than 27,000 people experiencing homelessness.  The site also provided 46,410 meals and more than 64,000 bottles of water over the course of three months.<img style="margin:5px;width:495px;" src="/policesite/MediaAssets/Convention%20Center%20Homeless%20Services.jpg" /><br><br>Funds were also provided to <a href="https://www.justacenter.org/" target="_blank">Justa Center</a>, which serves the senior homeless population to purchase an air-conditioned tent for their parking lot.  St. Vincent de Paul also received funds to add shade structures and staffing to help those on the street receive shelter from the sun.<br><br><img style="width:321px;" alt="" src="file:///C:/Users/077882/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image004.png" /><strong>EMERGENCY SHELTER OPTION</strong><br><br>Using a hotel property, Project Haven has 95 separate units for those most vulnerable during the pandemic.  CASS staff provides case management services and emergency shelter while more permanent housing opportunities are found.<br><br>.<img class="" style="margin:5px;width:493px;vertical-align:baseline;height:307px;" src="/policesite/MediaAssets/Homeless%20Housing%20Hotel.png" /><br><strong>HOUSING VETERANS</strong><br><br>Last month, Phoenix closed on a vacant property which will be used to provide housing and services for homeless and at-risk veterans and their families.  The $10.5 million project will provide 174 rooms for those veterans, along with a commercial kitchen and conference room where those who served in the military will have access to more stable housing, food and other services.<br><br><strong>AFFORDABLE HOUSING</strong><br><br>The COVID-19 pandemic is intensifying an already existing housing crisis.  Housing Phoenix Plan launched in 2019 addressing the city's housing challenges created projects and goals to increase affordable housing options.  This includes the Choice Neighborhoods Implementation Grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).<br><br>This on-going project utilizes $29 million in grant funding to refurbish the state's largest concentration of public housing.  The grant money is being used to revitalize the Edison-Eastlake Community.  577 units of obsolete public housing will be converted into more than 1,000 mixed-income modern housing units.  An additional 177 new mixed-income homes, some as large as 5 bedrooms, are under development in the Soluna Apartments.<br><br><img style="margin:5px;width:495px;" src="/policesite/MediaAssets/Edison%20Eastlake.jpg" /><br><br>In addition, the city allocated $20 million to turn an obsolete public housing complex at 14th St. & Monroe into a new apartment complex.  The Monroe Gardens will include 78 energy-efficient units.  The HUD Rental Assistance Demonstration program caps residents housing costs at 30 percent of their adjusted income.<br><br><strong>RENT AND MORTGAGE ASSISTANCE</strong><br><br>In addition to the funds invested by the City, Phoenix has also secured nearly $82 million in federal grants approved by Congress including the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) funding as well as the Omnibus Spending Bill to support keeping people in their homes.  The initial $29 million was used to offset the economic impact of COVID-19 on Phoenix families, providing them help paying their mortgage or rent and paying for utilities.  This money helped 6,616 families keep a roof over their heads.  Another 385 vulnerable refugee or asylum-seeking families also received housing assistance.    <br><br>Beginning next month, Phoenix residents can apply for a portion of an additional $51 million grant.  This money is specifically earmarked for renters impacted by economic conditions affected by the pandemic.<br><br>The city also dedicated nearly $12 million in CARES funding to further serve the needs of the homeless community during the pandemic.  This includes more than $4 million given to <a href="https://umom.org/" target="_blank">UMOM</a>, a Phoenix shelter that has been providing housing and services for families and single women experiencing homelessness for more than 50 years.  <a href="https://www.cassaz.org/" target="_blank">CASS</a> received more than $6 million to serve a large population of seniors and disabled individuals and families experiencing homelessness.  Grants were also provided to <a href="https://www.nativeconnections.org/youth-services" target="_blank">Native American Connections</a> to provide services for youth as well as money for housing vouchers designed to supplement those who can't pay the full amount of their monthly rent. <br><br><strong>HOW YOU CAN HELP</strong><br><br>We know our community wants to help, but Covid has presented unique challenges for supporting those experiencing homelessness.  Maricopa County Department of Public Health has established a <a href="http://www.givesmartaz.org/" target="_blank">Give Smart website</a> to provide the best ways to provide support to people experiencing homelessness.   Giving to those panhandling on the street may satisfy hunger for the moment, but it unintentionally withholds people from seeking assistance from organizations that not only can provide a hot meal in a safe environment, but who also provide supportive services that can help end homelessness. Street giving also creates crowds which puts an already vulnerable population's health at risk. It keeps people on the streets and negatively impacts communities. By giving smart, you can be part of creating real, long-lasting change. <br><br><br><p><br></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/humanservicesNewshuman-services
City of Phoenix Adopts Additional Homelessness Services in 2021https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/human-services/2091Human Services10/4/2021 11:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2091/Untitled (1920 x 1080 px).jpgCity of Phoenix Adopts Additional Homelessness Services in 2021<div class="ExternalClassBD8A0B2EF0A845BB95236E57D47E7033"><html> The city of Phoenix prioritizes leading with services when it comes to those experiencing homelessness, and the city recognizes that there are unique populations experiencing homelessness that require specialized service to best meet their needs.<br><br>​In 2021, the mayor and city council approved implementing new practices designed to supplement the city of Phoenix's ongoing “<a target="_blank" href="/humanservicessite/Documents/Homeless%20Strategies%20Final%20Report.pdf">Strategies to Address Homelessness</a>" plan developed in 2020.<br><br><strong>Heat Relief Program ​</strong><br><br>The city's Heat Relief Program was extended through September 2021 with funding from the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA). City council voted to extend an agreement for the rental of heat relief equipment, including shade structures around the Human Services Campus and at St. Vincent de Paul's Watkins location. The city's Heat Relief Program was developed to reduce the effects of extreme heat on populations like those experiencing homelessness.<br><br>The city also launched heat relief buses during the summer months of 2021. Out-of-circulation city buses parked outside of the Human Services Campus every day from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., serving as mobile cooling centers. People could grab water or come on to the air-conditioned buses to cool off. <br><br>"We must do everything we can to help this vulnerable population during the hot summer months," Phoenix District 7 Councilwoman Yassamin Ansari said of the heat relief cooling buses initiative she spearheaded. “I'm proud to be able to deliver yet another avenue for dignified heat relief and will continue this proactive work in 2022."<br><br>During the months of July, August, and September 2021, there were more than 12,700 visits to cooling buses. This total may include duplicate counts, as they are tallied each hour. <br><br><strong>Cleanups</strong><br><br>For years, the city of Phoenix conducted once-a-week coordinated cleanups of the area outside the Human Services Campus. In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, mayor and council directed the city's Street Transportation Department to begin cleaning three times a week on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday—except for holidays. The increased weekly cleanups began in April 2020 and have continued in 2021. The purpose of the cleanups is to protect the health and safety of people living in and around the encampment.<br><br>"The trash starts to build up again almost immediately after each cleanup," said Bill Morlan, owner of Electric Supply, Inc. located near the Human Services Campus. “I cannot imagine the impact on the unsheltered, the neighborhoods, and the community if these cleanups were not happening.  As someone who has been in this neighborhood for decades, I appreciate the city's efforts."<br><br>The city's Street Transportation Department removes approximately four tons of items per month from the roadways and sidewalks during these cleanups.<br><br><strong>Emergency Rental Assistance Program </strong><br><br>Preventing the loss of housing through eviction prevention is a priority in the “Strategies to Address Homelessness." Arizona has had a high eviction rate that has only worsened in 2021. City council allocated $51.1 million in federal emergency rental assistance dollars to begin the <a target="_blank" href="/humanservices/rental-assistance">Emergency Rental Assistance (ERA) Program</a> in March of 2021. As of October 2021, the city was distributing an average of $2 million per week to help people with their rent or utilities. The ERA Program is one of nearly a dozen funding sources the city has to assist Phoenix residents with rent and utilities.<br><br>Additionally, through a partnership with Community Legal Services, the city created the <a target="_blank" href="/humanservices/programs/landlord-tenant-counseling">Tenants Eviction Assistance Project (TEAP)</a>. TEAP provides no-cost legal assistance to residents experiencing an eviction crisis, including working cooperatively with local agencies administering COVID-19 related rental and utility assistance programs for the city of Phoenix, Maricopa County, and the state of Arizona.<br><br><strong>PHX C.A.R.E.S.</strong><br><br><a target="_blank" href="/phxcares">PHX C.A.R.E.S.</a> (community, action, response, engagement, services) is an ongoing coordinated response to work with neighborhoods and individuals experiencing homelessness to educate and focus on solutions. For those experiencing homelessness, PHX C.A.R.E.S. sends trained outreach teams to encourage them to accept the services and resources that are offered to help end their homelessness.<br><br>If you or someone you know needs resources to address homelessness, you can contact PHX C.A.R.E.S. at 602-262-6251, or <a target="_blank" href="https://phxatyourservice.dynamics365portals.us/phxcares/">submit a request online</a>.<br><br><strong>Strategies to Address Homelessness</strong><br><br>Homelessness is a growing issue across the country, including here in Arizona. It is an issue principally addressed by the city of Phoenix, in tandem with local non-profit partners.<br><br>In October 2020, the mayor and city council approved the city's “Strategies to Address Homelessness": a comprehensive eight-part plan addressing complex and far-reaching challenges that homelessness represents in our community. This strategic plan was developed from data collected in community meetings and surveys. In the course of collecting this data, 700+ people attended meetings, 2,200+ people filled out surveys, 2,200+ community comments were received, and 3,700+ survey comments were processed. <br><br>In order to determine priorities for plan implementation, the city council directed the city manager to create the Strategies to Address Homelessness Plan Task Force. This task force meets monthly and is comprised of 18 neighborhood, business, community, and homeless advocates. View the <a target="_blank" href="/humanservicessite/Documents/Homeless%20Strategies%20Final%20Report.pdf">“Strategies to Address Homelessness" here.</a><br> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/humanservicesNewshuman-services

Ho​w it Helps

At its core, PHX C.A.R.E.S. is the city's process of connecting the community with services like encampment cleanups, shelters, and other resources for individuals and families experiencing homelessness.​​Report to PHX C.A.R.E.S.
How It Works​​
Snapshot of Homelessness