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A coordinated response for neig​hborhoods and individuals experiencing homelessness—​ offering education, resources, and encampment cleanups. ​

Call: 602-262-6251​​​​​​​

  ​Monday-Saturday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 


 PHX C.A.R.E.S. at Work

 

 

HOW IT WORKS1766https://www.phoenix.gov/Media Assets/Sliders/HOW IT WORKS.jpgHOW IT WORKShttps://www.phoenix.gov/humanservicessite/Documents/How%20It%20Works.pdfhttps://www.phoenix.gov/Media Assets/Forms/DispForm.aspx?ID=1766 ​​​PHX C.A.R.E.S. is a coordinated response for neighborhoods and individuals experiencing homelessness—offering education, resources, and encampment cleanups. ​ <div class="ExternalClassD994A2B9545242BD8E5B3C515BCE3232">​​​PHX C.A.R.E.S. is a coordinated response for neighborhoods and individuals experiencing homelessness—offering education, resources, and encampment cleanups. ​<br></div>0x0101009148F5A04DDD49CBA7127AADA5FB792B00AADE34325A8B49CDA8BB4DB53328F214007F80A03ACE71234A93E8BBD7B87318C1Image
WORKING TOGETHER1767https://www.phoenix.gov/Media Assets/Sliders/WORKING TOGETHER.jpgWORKING TOGETHERhttps://www.phoenix.gov/nsd/programs/cleanups-and-tool-lendinghttps://www.phoenix.gov/Media Assets/Forms/DispForm.aspx?ID=1767 ​​​From connecting neighbors for community meetings, to organizing neighborhood cleanups, there is help to beautify your neighborhoods, and to increase the sense of community. ​​ <div class="ExternalClass8CCEA93D7AE6434FAA985107C6F09D28"><p>​​​From connecting neighbors for community meetings, to organizing neighborhood cleanups, there is help to beautify your neighborhoods, and to increase the sense of community. ​​<br></p></div>0x0101009148F5A04DDD49CBA7127AADA5FB792B00AADE34325A8B49CDA8BB4DB53328F214007F80A03ACE71234A93E8BBD7B87318C1Image

Strategies to Address Homelessness

The Phoenix City Council requested a strategic plan to focus on strategies for persons experiencing homelessness as well as developing best practices to mitigate impacts to surrounding communities and neighborhoods.​ Read the Strategies to Address Homelessness Plan​.

In January 2021, a task force made up of neighborhood leaders, service providers, and homeless advocates began meeting to prioritize and provide recommendations on the City’s efforts to deploy the Plan. Throughout 2021, the Task Force met to review and evaluate the City’s Strategies to Address Homelessness Plan. The recommendations were made in consensus among the Task Force members and were presented to the Phoenix City Manager as well to the Phoenix City Council Community and Cultural Investment Subcommittee on April 6, 2022. Read the recommendations or watch the Subcommittee presentation​.​

 

 

City Takes Proactive Safety Steps to Protect Residents as Extreme Summer Heat Hits Phoenix https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/human-services/2387Human Services6/16/2022 11:30:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2387/Newsroom_HumanServices_005.jpgCity Takes Proactive Safety Steps to Protect Residents as Extreme Summer Heat Hits Phoenix <div class="ExternalClass0721CA2FA6EF4C85B0000F2AD5C2B4B4"><p> The City of Phoenix is proactively working to reverse the trend of increasing heat-related deaths in Maricopa County and save lives this summer by increasing resources dedicated to heat respite. In 2021, there were 338 heat-associated deaths in Maricopa County. Of those, 130 (42%) were among people experiencing homelessness. The number of heat-associated deaths among those experiencing homelessness declined by 24% from 2020 to 2021 while the overall number of heat-associated deaths continued to rise.</p><p> The City is dedicated to providing safe places where people in need can go to cool down during the hot summer months. That includes providing heat respite for more than 1,600 people during the day and 1,180 people at night, either through direct funding or partnerships with Maricopa County and non-profit agencies. In 2022, the City has added the following new resources: </p><ul><li><p> A total of four new shade structures at the Human Services Campus (HSC). There is an enclosed shade structure with air conditioning at 9th Avenue and Jackson which can serve 120 people during the day. There are also three new additional shade structures with evaporative cooling on the Campus lawn and at 12th Avenue and Madison, which can serve 200 people during the day. People do not need an HSC identification card, or any ID, to access the cooling tents at 9th Avenue and Jackson or at 12th Avenue and Madison. </p></li></ul><ul><li><p> The Office of Heat Response and Mitigation (OHRM) is distributing high-quality, insulated, reusable water bottles; hats; sunscreen; personal misters; and cooling towels to those who are in need around the Human Services Campus, and across the city. Volunteers with the We're Cool program are helping distribute supplies on the streets several times each week.</p></li></ul><ul><li><p> OHRM has also provided 30,000 of the above-mentioned heat relief items free of charge to 30 community nonprofit organizations that in turn help distribute the items through their own outreach efforts. </p></li></ul><ul><li><p> The City provided additional ice chests and water for distribution at the Human Services Campus located at 9th Avenue and Jackson and 12th Avenue and Madison.</p></li></ul><ul><li><p> The City identified a vacant building at 2739 E. Washington St. and quickly created a 24/7 heat respite center for 200 people which opened in mid-May. The shelter provides wraparound services and is unique in that it prioritizes serving people experiencing homelessness in the neighborhood surrounding the shelter and in the area surrounding the Human Services Campus. $16 million of the approved ARPA Second Tranche Strategic Plan is dedicated to keeping this facility open beyond the summer for an additional two years, through at least December 2024. </p></li></ul><ul><li><p> The City funded the new $1.6 million Respiro Structure, which opened in March at the Human Services Campus, adding 100 shelter beds to provide day and nighttime respite for people experiencing homelessness. </p></li></ul><ul><li><p> The City funded 175 new beds at Central Arizona Shelter Services (CASS), expanding its capacity to 600 people. The City also worked with CASS to expand services to include daytime heat respite instead of offering respite only at night. </p></li></ul><ul><li><p> OHRM developed an outreach plan in coordination with the Human Services Department (HSD) for those around the Human Services Campus. The goals are as follows: </p></li></ul><ul><ul><li><p> Guide individuals to the new, enclosed cooling tent and other available resources via direct contacts and signage</p></li><li><p> Provide heat relief supplies at/near the cooling tent</p></li><li><p> Monitor use of shade/cooling/water areas on and around HSC </p></li><li><p> Collect temperature/thermal comfort measurements in various shade/cooling area</p></li><li><p>Provide information about additional nearby cooling centers and hydration stations if needed.</p></li></ul></ul><ul><li><p> The City provided additional funding to the Human Services Campus and Community Bridges, Inc. for outreach teams focused on engaging people who are unsheltered and encouraging people to come to safe, indoor spaces. </p></li></ul><ul><li><p> On June 7, the Phoenix City Council approved an additional $70.5 million in affordable housing and homelessness projects as part of the City's ARPA Second Tranche Strategic Plan. An additional $9M was committed in the ARPA Second Tranche Strategic Plan to tree and shade initiatives that will contribute to long-term heat mitigation and thermal comfort for residents and visitors. The City had previously dedicated $50 million to homeless solutions in the fiscal year 2021-22 </p></li></ul><p> Additionally, the City works with several community partners to continue previously-offered heat relief options including: </p><ul><li><p> The Lodestar Day Resource Center (LDRC) at the Human Services Campus provides day and night heat relief for 100 people. </p></li></ul><ul><li><p> St. Vincent de Paul provides day and night heat relief for 180 people in its dining hall. </p></li></ul><ul><li><p> The Justa Center provides daytime heat respite for 120 people. </p></li></ul><ul><li><p> The City of Phoenix is part of the Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG)'s regional Heat Relief Network, which offers cooling centers and hydration stations to people in need throughout the County. More than 50 of the 100+ cooling centers are within Phoenix city limits. <br></p></li><li><p> Free transportation to cooling centers and hydration stations is available 8 a.m.-5 p.m. by calling 2-1-1, thanks to a generous contribution from Arizona Public Service (APS). <br></p></li><li><p> The City invites participation in direct heat relief outreach efforts to vulnerable community members through the We're Cool and Cool Callers programs. Those interested to participate can learn more and sign up at phoenix.gov/volunteer. </p></li></ul><p> To learn more about how to manage the extreme heat of summer visit <a target="_blank" href="/heatsite"> Phoenix.gov/HeatSite</a> and <a target="_blank" href="http://www.heataz.org/"> HeatAZ.org</a>.</p><p>Find cooling stations and water through the Heat Relief Network:<a target="_blank" href="https://hrn.azmag.gov/">hrn.azmag.gov</a>.<br></p><p> View heat-health data: <a target="_blank" href="https://www.maricopa.gov/ArchiveCenter/ViewFile/Item/5404"> https://www.maricopa.gov/ArchiveCenter/ViewFile/Item/5404</a>.<br></p></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/humanservicesNewshuman-services
How The City of Phoenix is Working to Address Homelessnesshttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/human-services/2266Human Services3/11/2022 8:30:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2266/Newsroom_HSD_001.pngHow The City of Phoenix is Working to Address Homelessness<div class="ExternalClass6F88F586D29748A9A3BA2FA1DABCF0EC"><html>The Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG) released the <a href="https://azmag.gov/Portals/0/Homelessness/PIT-Count/2022/2022-2014_Unsheltered-Street-Count-by-Municipality.pdf?ver=BVaJMWAetqGlbxwUGnDTjw%3d%3d" target="_blank">data</a> today from its 2022 Point-in-Time (PIT) Homeless Count. The PIT Count is an annual street and shelter count to determine the number of people experiencing homelessness in Maricopa County during a given point in time, as part of a national effort to identify the extent of homelessness nationwide. The numbers reflect a two-year increase since the 2021 count was not conducted due to the COVID pandemic.<br><br>The pandemic strained economies worldwide. In our community, it resulted in the loss of jobs that hit low-wage earners particularly hard, putting them at greater risk of experiencing homelessness. Rising housing costs in the region also make more people vulnerable to homelessness. According to the PIT Homeless Count, the number of people experiencing homelessness within the City of Phoenix was 3,096. Due to the Covid-19 Crisis and the rise in housing and rental prices, the City of Phoenix anticipated an increase in homelessness and has taken steps to help mitigate the situation.<br><br>This fiscal year, the City dedicated nearly $50 million for homelessness solutions to provide shelters, rapid rehousing, outreach, and mental health services through partnerships with various community organizations and nonprofits.<br><br><strong style="text-decoration:underline;">Homelessness Solutions:</strong><br style="text-decoration:underline;"><br><strong>Shelters:</strong> $27.9 million.<br>A Sprung Structure is currently being constructed on the Human Services Campus (HSC) which will add 100 new beds and additional restrooms in the area. That project is expected to be complete in mid-March 2022. The City of Phoenix also funded 175 new beds at Central Arizona Shelter Services (CASS). Additional funding provides an emergency crisis shelter for families at Chicanos Por La Causa, a shelter for veterans with 145 rooms, an emergency shelter for vulnerable seniors as well as COVID-19 emergency shelters.<br><br><strong>Rapid Rehousing:</strong> $4.7 million.<br>The City of Phoenix contracted with community partners CASS, A New Leaf, Inc. & UMOM to provide COVID-19 Rapid Rehousing for families, single women & single men. The City also contracted with Community Bridges, Inc. (CBI) for Rapid Rehousing bridge support and Native American Connections (NAC) for Rapid Rehousing support for youth.<br><br><strong>Outreach Services:</strong> $8.3 million.<br>The City of Phoenix prioritizes leading with services when it comes to those experiencing homelessness and recognizes that there are unique populations that require specialized services to best meet their needs. The City provides outreach and engagement services for persons experiencing homelessness through contracts with various community partners. Services include veteran navigation & coordination services, navigation & wraparound services for justice-involved individuals, COVID-19 support for seniors experiencing homelessness, and COVID-19 related homelessness prevention. Community partners include CBI, HSC, Southwest Behavioral & Health Services (SWBH), Justa Center, U.S. Vets, Homeward Bound, and Phoenix Rescue Mission.<br><br><strong>Mental Health Services: </strong>$9 million.<br>The City of Phoenix has a tentative contract with Mercy Care, set to begin on or about April 2022, to provide mental health services for people experiencing homelessness.<br><br><strong style="text-decoration:underline;">Eviction Prevention:<br></strong><br style="text-decoration:underline;">Preventing the loss of housing through eviction prevention is a priority in the City of Phoenix. The U.S. Treasury has allocated 106 million dollars to the City of Phoenix for Emergency Rental Assistance to prevent residents from losing their homes. $51.1 million was allocated to begin ERA 1.0 on March 8, 2021. All ERA 1.0 program funds were disbursed as of January 2022. The Treasury allocated $55.3 million for ERA 2.0, the City began disbursement of those funds in October 2021. To date, $66,060,002 in rental assistance has been disbursed.<br><br>Additionally, through a partnership with <a href="https://clsaz.org/" target="_blank">Community Legal Services</a>, the city created the <a href="/humanservices/programs/landlord-tenant-counseling" target="_blank">Tenants Eviction Assistance Project (TEAP)</a>. TEAP provides no-cost legal assistance to residents experiencing an eviction crisis, including working cooperatively with local agencies administering COVID-19 related rental and utility assistance programs for the City of Phoenix, Maricopa County, and the state of Arizona.<br><br><strong style="text-decoration:underline;">Affordable Housing Initiatives:​​<br></strong><br>The City of Phoenix operates 1,567 public housing units, administers more than 7,000 Housing Choice Vouchers, and provides 1,200 housing units to seniors. The following are several of the City's major affordable housing initiatives:<br><br><strong>Housing Phoenix Plan: </strong>The Housing Phoenix plan was adopted by the Mayor & City Council in 2020 to continue to explore innovative and effective strategies to continue to provide critical affordable housing for the community. It set the goal of creating or preserving 50,000 homes by 2030. Through December 2021, 23,090 units have been created or preserved.<br><br><strong>New affordable housing creation:</strong> The City of Phoenix invested approximately $5.8 million to develop 126 new affordable single-family detached homes for low- and moderate-income homebuyers in South Phoenix Village (SPV).<br><br><strong>Landlord Incentive Program:</strong> The City of Phoenix provided $500,000 in incentives to landlords for accepting vouchers, with another $1 million in the pipeline. 570 landlords have received incentive payments for executing 1,297 Housing Assistance Payments (HAP) contracts. On Feb 16, 2022, City Council approved increasing the incentive payments to $2,000.<br><br><strong>Housing Rehabilitation Program:</strong> The City of Phoenix Invested nearly $2.5 million to preserve 164 affordable homes, with an average per-home investment of nearly $15,000 in 2021 alone.<br><br><strong>Down payment assistance:</strong> The City of Phoenix worked to support low-income, first-time homebuyers by selling 299 homes from the City of Phoenix public housing portfolio.<br><br><strong>HOME Investment Partnership Program:</strong> The City of Phoenix's distribution of HOME funds has been successful in delivering approximately 6,300 affordable housing units, with 1,200 underway today.<br><br>The City of Phoenix unifies community partners and resources to respond to neighborhoods and businesses impacted by homelessness with education and services. If you have questions or concerns about a homelessness issue in your neighborhood, you are encouraged to report it to PHX C.A.R.E.S. by calling 602-262-6251 or fill out a report <a href="https://phxatyourservice.dynamics365portals.us/phxcares/" target="_blank">here</a>.<br><br></html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/humanservicesNewshuman-services
City Rolls Out Mobile Career Unit (MCU) for Community Feedbackhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/human-services/2122Human Services10/29/2021 12:00:00 AMhttps://youtu.be/IhIFDTWY-gECity Rolls Out Mobile Career Unit (MCU) for Community Feedback<div class="ExternalClass82E92FD1CD184ECA80E10B725AA61F53"><html> <p> When you think of a bus, you probably think transportation—getting people to their desired destinations. Well, the city of Phoenix is hoping this bus will get people to their desired destinations…in their careers. <br></p> <p>"We’re really hoping people find their dream jobs at a mobile career van," Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego said. <br></p> <p>The Mobile Career Unit, or MCU, is the city’s submission in the <a href="https://bloombergcities.jhu.edu/mayors-challenge" target="_blank">2021 Bloomberg Philanthropies Global Mayors Challenge</a>. The MCU's goal is to connect employers to job seekers, right in their communities, making jobs accessible in every corner of our city. <br></p> <p>"We learned during COVID, when we sent out vans to do testing, that there are many people who really appreciated being at their church, their kids school, in their local library," Mayor Gallego said. "We’re doing the same thing with jobs."<br></p> <p>The MCU has been spotted in parking lots from Food City to the Burton Bar Central Library. Job seeker walk up, and are helped through the application process, then step inside the MCU for an interview with an employer. Several job seekers have been hired right on the spot! </p> <p>The MCU is in the testing phase, and the city is encouraging the community to try it out and tell us what you think. Mayor Gallego stopped by to check it out. </p> <p>"I just got to sit down with the Renaissance Hotel, which is interviewing people today," Mayor Gallego explained. "We have this great screen, where it feels like you’re in the office. So many people are in transition now, and it’s my hope as mayor that people will get a chance to be in jobs that are incredibly fulfilling."<br></p> <p>And that brings us back to the core of the Global Mayors Challenge—a challenge to cities to think about how we will come out of this pandemic, and what needs will be the greatest. More than 600 cities entered the challenge this year, and Phoenix has made it to the Champion Cities finalist phase. If the mobile career unit is chosen as a winner, the city will get up to one million dollars to keep the MCU rolling. </p> <p>"Phoenix, along with the 49 other finalist cities, have already proven that their ideas are tackling some of the most pressing issues facing cities around the world," Andrea Coleman, from Bloomberg Philantrhopies, said. "Phoenix in particular, trying to help get their residents back to work—this is something that is a top priority for mayors around the world." </p> <p>You can learn more about the mobile career unit, and how you can try it out for yourself, <a href="/mayor/challenge" target="_blank">on our website here</a>. <br></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/humanservicesVideohuman-services
January is National Human Trafficking Prevention Monthhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/human-services/2977Human Services1/10/2024 4:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2977/city hall.jpgJanuary is National Human Trafficking Prevention Month<div class="ExternalClassB847BE3FC97B4513A21A8209335F5465"><html> <p>​<span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">The City of Phoenix invites you to help raise awareness about Human Trafficking this month and all year. January is National Human Trafficking Prevention Month. More than 27.6 million adults and children are subject to human trafficking around the world.  </span><span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">In 2013, the Mayor's Human Trafficking Task Force, chaired by Councilman Jim Waring adopted a plan called “The Compass" to eliminate human trafficking.</span></p> <p>The plan focuses on four areas:</p> <ul style="" class="" dir=""><li>Law enforcement</li><li>Victim's Services</li><li>Training </li><li>Awareness and Outreach</li></ul> <p>The City's awareness efforts are headed by the Strategic Initiatives team. You can follow them on social media on <a target="_blank" href="https://www.facebook.com/PHXStrategicInitiatives">Facebook</a> or <a target="_blank" href="https://twitter.com/i/flow/login?redirect_after_login=/PHXInitiatives">X/Twitter</a> for information and resources all month. To learn more, go to the <a target="_blank" href="/humanservices/programs/strategicinitiatives">City of Phoenix Strategic Initiatives webpage</a>.</p> <p> <a target="_blank" href="https://youtu.be/WspexHS4JxA">This PSA produced by PHXTV</a> highlights two human trafficking survivors on their plight of getting out of today's modern slavery. </p> <p>To report suspected human trafficking contact the Human Trafficking Hotline at 1-877-4AZ-TIPS. ​<br></p> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/humanservicesNewshuman-services

Ho​w it Helps

At its core, PHX C.A.R.E.S. is the city's process of connecting the community with services like encampment cleanups, shelters, and other resources for individuals and families experiencing homelessness.​​Report to PHX C.A.R.E.S.
How It Works​​
Snapshot of Homelessness
Resources to Donate