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Phoenix Achieves Zero Waste Goal for Downtown Super Bowl Events https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/public-works/2666Public Works (Trash and Recycling)2/24/2023 10:30:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2666/newsroom_pwd_zero waste wrap.jpgPhoenix Achieves Zero Waste Goal for Downtown Super Bowl Events <div class="ExternalClassA6D69529CAE3488DB67E2A0E14AC3EA7"><html> <div><span style="font-size:16px;"> The City of Phoenix Public Works Department reached its goal of diverting at least 92% of waste from Super Bowl events away from the landfill. After final sorting and weighing, the 2023 Super Bowl events hosted in downtown Phoenix surpassed a previous Super Bowl’s diversion rate of 91% to become the greenest Super Bowl in history. The final diversion rate of city-collected trash from downtown Super Bowl events was 92.6%, qualifying it as a zero-waste event.  </span></div><div><span style="font-size:16px;"><br></span></div><div><span style="font-size:16px;"><img style="margin:5px;width:495px;" alt="" src="/publicworkssite/MediaAssets/Zero%20Waste%20tonnage%20graph%20(3).png" /><br></span></div><div><span style="font-size:16px;"><br></span></div> <div><span style="font-size:16px;background-color:window;color:windowtext;">​​“</span><span style="font-size:16px;background-color:window;color:windowtext;">We see this as a huge, historic win,” said Lorizelda Stoeller, Deputy Public Works Director and Chair of the Super Bowl Steering Committee Green Initiatives group. “This took a lot of planning ahead of time to educate the public on separating trash from recyclables. It also took a lot of hard work from staff, volunteers, and contractors who helped sort through collected garbage to ensure we weren’t landfilling any plastics or other materials that could instead be recycled.” </span><br></div> <div><span style="font-size:16px;"> <br> </span></div> <div><span style="font-size:16px;"> Ultimately, 81 tons of material were recycled from this year’s events. With help from Downtown Phoenix, Inc., Keep Phoenix Beautiful, and Volunteer PHX, Phoenix had 51 volunteers serving as Zero Waste Ambassadors, who guided visitors to put trash, recyclables, and food waste into separate receptacles throughout the downtown area.  </span></div> <div><span style="font-size:16px;"> <br> </span></div> <div><span style="font-size:16px;"> The last time Arizona hosted the Super Bowl in 2015, Phoenix set a goal to divert 80% of waste from the landfill. In the end, the final diversion rate achieved that year was 73%.  Since then, however, the City of Phoenix has added more robust resources and <a href="/newsroom/public-works/2633" target="_blank">technology at the Compost Facility​</a>. Public Works was able to process nearly 12 tons of food waste from the 2023 Super Bowl Experience – more than 11% of everything that was thrown away.  </span></div> <div><span style="font-size:16px;"> <br> </span></div> <div><span style="font-size:16px;"> “We couldn’t have reached our goal without the new machinery that separates food packaging from food waste,” said Deputy Public Works Director Eduardo Rodriguez. “Because of it, we were able to keep all that organic material out of the landfill. Soon it will become clean compost that will help beautify parks and other areas across the city.”  </span></div> <div><span style="font-size:16px;"> <br> </span></div> <div><span style="font-size:16px;"> The final diversion numbers show this was the greenest Super Bowl in history. During the week of Super Bowl events, Public Works employees also continued regular collection of residential waste, recycling, and bulk trash and even received and processed waste from Scottsdale during the Waste Management Phoenix Open.  </span></div> <div><span style="font-size:16px;"> <br> </span></div> <div><span style="font-size:16px;">  “This is one more example of how Phoenix has set the bar high for all Super Bowls to come," said Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego. "Reaching Zero Waste for an event of this size is an incredible win that demonstrates our City's commitment to sustainability and environmental stewardship. Thank you to our Public Works team, volunteers, and visitors who contributed to this effort of reducing waste and creating a greener future."  </span></div> <p>​<br></p> </html></div>https://phoenix.gov/publicworksNewspublic-worksA worker changes a trash bag from a food waste receptacle in downtown PhoenixPublic Works#SuperBowl #SuperPHX #SuperBowlLVII #SBLVII #ZeroWaste @CityofPhoenixAZSuper Bowl, downtown Phoenix, sustainability, recyclingSpencer Blake602-501-0620spencer.blake@phoenix.govTalkingTrashPHX

 

 

Popular Phoenix Trails to Close During Extremely Hot Dayshttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/parks-and-recreation/3080Parks and Recreation4/22/2024 4:30:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/3080/Trail-Closure-at-Piestewa-Peak.jpgPopular Phoenix Trails to Close During Extremely Hot Days<div class="ExternalClassED91D3EB345F479CB56F4199D66815AB"><html> <p>Three popular City of Phoenix hiking trails will close during extremely hot days.<br></p> <p>On days when the National Weather Service issues an Excessive Heat Warning, Camelback Mountain's Echo and Cholla Trails and all trails associated with Piestewa Peak Trailhead in the Phoenix Mountains Preserve will close from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.​<br></p> <p>During Excessive Heat Warnings, trail access is limited, parking lot gates will be closed, and signage will be posted. Closure information will be posted on the Phoenix Parks and Recreation Department's website and social media accounts, and to local resorts and hotels. Additionally, Phoenix Park Rangers will be visible at those locations to remind and educate trail users about the restrictions. Email notifications are also available by <a href="/parks/trails/take-a-hike-do-it-right" target="_blank"><strong style="color:rgb(139, 0, 0);">signing up for “Hiking and Heat Updates" online.</strong></a> </p> <p>To help with that recommendation, extended summer hours are in effect annually from June  through September at North Mountain Park and Piestewa Peak Trailhead in the Phoenix Mountains Preserve, and Pima Canyon Trailhead in South Mountain Park/Preserve. To provide an extra two hours of availability and promote hiking after 7 p.m., parking lot entrances are open until 9 p.m. at those locations. Year-round at those three trailheads, parking lots open at 5 a.m., and trails are open until 11 p.m. All other trails within the Phoenix parks system will remain open.</p> <p>During the Valley's warm weather months, and regardless of whether an Excessive Heat Watch is in effect, it is recommended that trail users hike during the early morning or evening hours when it is cooler and there is more shade.</p> <p>Looking for an open trail? There are more than 200 miles of open trails within the City of Phoenix. Visit <a href="http://www.phoenix.gov/trails" target="_blank"><strong style="color:rgb(139, 0, 0);">Phoenix.gov/trails</strong></a><span style="color:rgb(139, 0, 0);"> </span>to plan your next hike.</p> <p> <strong>BACKGROUND</strong> </p> <p>In summer 2021, the Parks and Recreation Department ran a 2 ½ month pilot program from July 13 to September 30 in which they closed these same trails to reduce heat-related injuries and deaths and reduce the risk of injuries to rescue personnel.</p> <p>In October of 2021, the Parks and Recreation Board formally adopted the program limiting hiking on some trails from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on National Weather Service issued Heat Warning days.</p> <p>The first full season of the Trails and Heat Safety Program ran from May 1, 2022, through Sept. 30, 2022, for a duration of 153 days. There were 18 <a href="http://www.weather.gov/" target="_blank"><strong style="color:rgb(139, 0, 0);"><span style="">National Weather Service</span> </strong></a>(NWS) issued Heat Warning Days and, therefore, 18 resulting trail closure days in 2022. In 2023, there were 42 trail closure days. </p> <p>In August of 2023, the Parks and Recreation Board expanded the trail closure program to cover the entire year (previously ​May – October) and extended the closure hours to begin at 9 a.m. (previously 11 a.m.). <a href="/newsroom/parks-and-recreation/2852" target="_blank"><strong style="color:rgb(139, 0, 0);">Read more about the board's decision.</strong></a> </p> <p> <strong>TAKE A HIKE, DO IT RIGHT</strong> </p> <p>The Phoenix Parks and Recreation, and Fire departments have worked in partnership since 2015 to share the <a href="/parks/trails" target="_blank"><strong style="color:rgb(139, 0, 0);">“Take a Hike. Do it Right. </strong></a><span style="color:rgb(139, 0, 0);">"</span> hiking safety message and continue to lead with education about responsible hiking. All trail users should follow these important and potentially life-saving hiking guidelines:</p> <p>•Dress Appropriately: Wear proper shoes, clothing, hat, and sunscreen.</p> <p>•Bring Water: Hydrate before you go. Have plenty of water, more than you think you need. Turn around and head back to the trailhead before you drink half of your water.</p> <p>•Keep in Contact: Carry a mobile phone.</p> <p>•Team Up: Hike with others. If hiking solo, tell someone your start and end times, and location.</p> <p>•Be Honest: Do you have a medical condition? Asthma, heart problems, diabetes, knee or back problems? Don't push yourself! (Even trained athletes have been caught off guard by getting dehydrated on Arizona trails.)</p> <p>•Don't Trailblaze: Enjoy the Sonoran Desert's beautiful and undeveloped landscape, but please stay on designated trails.</p> <p>•Take Responsibility: Don't be "that person" – the one who wasn't prepared, shouldn't have been there for health reasons, or ignored safety guidelines. Be the responsible hiker, who takes a hike and does it right!</p> <p>For the safety of pets, dogs are prohibited on any City of Phoenix trail when the temperature is 100 degrees or warmer. The Arizona Humane Society advises that temperatures in the 90s are also unsafe for pets to be outdoors. <br></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/parksNews
Fire Ban in Desert Parks and Preserves Starts May 1https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/parks-and-recreation/3078Parks and Recreation4/19/2024 9:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/3078/Phoenix-Mountain-Preserve.jpgFire Ban in Desert Parks and Preserves Starts May 1<div class="ExternalClass707B3004499A4E278C1DBC87932404E8"><html> <p>The Phoenix Parks and Recreation Department will put into effect its annual ban of open fires in the City's desert parks and mountain preserves starting Wednesday, May 1, 2024. The Maricopa County Parks and Recreation Department's annual fire ban goes into effect the same day .</p><p>In consultation with the Phoenix Fire Department, smoking and charcoal fires are included in the ban due to the extreme fire danger that the combination of low humidity, increased temperatures, excessive dry vegetation, and frequent high winds create each spring.</p><p>The ban applies to <strong>Camelback Mountain, Deem Hills Recreation Area, Lookout Mountain, Papago Park, Phoenix Mountains Park and Recreation Area, Phoenix Mountains Preserve, Phoenix Sonoran Preserve, North Mountain Park, Rio Salado Habitat Restoration Area, and South Mountain Park/Preserve.</strong></p><p>The ban does not apply to the City's flatland parks.</p><p>For those using the City's desert parks and preserve land, the fire ban stipulates the following:</p><p>·       Open wood and charcoal fires are prohibited</p><p>·       Propane or gas grills may be used, but only in established picnic areas<br></p><p><strong>The following activities continue to be prohibited year-round:</strong></p><ul style="" class="" dir=""><li>Smoking outside enclosed vehicles </li><li>Fireworks</li></ul><p>Motorists traveling through or near Phoenix's desert parks and mountain preserves should use extreme care with smoking materials and dispose of those only in their vehicle's ash tray.</p><p>To protect their homes, residents whose property borders the City's preserve land may remove dry shrubs, brush and grasses, and trim dead branches from trees within the 10-foot strip of land that borders their property. By creating this 10-foot "buffer zone" residents can help to protect their homes from potential brush fires in the adjacent preserve land.</p><p>Preserve neighbors also should check irrigation lines and pool back-flush hoses to ensure that water is not seeping into the preserve. Outside water sources encourage unnaturally dense vegetation growth, which increases fire risk.<br></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/parksNews
​City Exhibit Takes Aim at Sexual Assault Victim “Shaming” and “Blaming”https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/human-services/3079Human Services4/19/2024 4:30:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/3079/library.jpg​City Exhibit Takes Aim at Sexual Assault Victim “Shaming” and “Blaming”<div class="ExternalClass42B88EECDE6A4A67B3CBCE0CA2D77D7B"><html> <p>​The City of Phoenix's Strategic Initiatives team invites you to visit a powerful exhibit to raise awareness about sexual assault as part of April's “Let's Talk Teal Campaign." April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and the city provides resources and awareness events all month.</p> <p>The exhibit titled “What were you wearing?" draws attention to the “rape culture," where questions and statements like these are common, and put the blame on the victim. Victim shaming and blaming discourages victims from coming forward to report the crime and seek help. The display features the stories of several survivors and a representation of the clothes they were wearing when they were assaulted. </p> <p>The exhibit is on display at Burton Barr Library on the 2nd floor through April 24th.</p> <p>The <a target="_blank" href="/humanservices/programs/strategicinitiatives">City of Phoenix's Strategic Initiatives</a> section collaborates with community partners to combat domestic violence, sexual assault, unhealthy youth relationships, human trafficking, and to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic. We achieve this mission through prevention, training, community awareness, and enhancing services for the overall well-being of those we serve.​<br></p> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/humanservicesNews

 

 

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