​​​​​​Granada Park

Tracker​​

 

 

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​​ARTIST:   David Phelps
DATE:   1989
LOCATION:  Granada Park​, 6050 N 20th Street
TYPE:   Sculpture
MATERIALS:   bronze
BUDGET:   $29,000​
DISTRICT:    6
ZIP CODE:   85016​


​A double life-size cast bronze figure, partially submerged, is pulling a boat through a dry river bed towards a lagoon.  In speaking about his sculpture Phelps said, “The incongruity created by allusions of both water and desert reflects the incongruity of Phoenix, a city which seems to be a virtual oasis in the middle of the desert.” This project is one of the earliest projects in the Public Art Program's 30+ year history.