​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ Officer-Involved Shootings (OIS) Information

 OIS Nav



PHX PD: Find the Blue in You!

​Introduction

The information on this page is intended to inform and educate the public about the use of deadly force, specifically Officer-Involved Shootings (OIS), and related topics from the ​Phoenix Police Department. See also: Police Transparency

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 Officer Involved Shooting Incidents

 Critical Incident Briefing: Atlanta Ave. Officer Involved Shooting

The Phoenix Police Department has released new video, pictures and radio transmissions from an officer involved shooting that took place on November 3, 2019 on Atlanta Ave. near 28th Street & Roeser.

This incident resulted in the suspect losing his life along with injuries to four others including two women inside the home and two officers.

Please note, at the time of this incident, the Special Assignments Unit was not assigned body-worn cameras. 

 CIB - November 3, 2019 - Atlanta Ave.

Frequently Asked Questions (F.A.Q.)

Review Frequently Asked Questions. Activate blue buttons to reveal answers.


Question 1: Is the Police Department rolling out body cameras now in response to the OIS Study?

Phoenix Police

Answer: No. The process to acquire body-worn cameras started in 2011 with 18 cameras.

In 2013 a pilot program in the Maryvale/Estrella Mountain Precinct was launched. It eventually expanded to 300 cameras in patrols in the field and in our Crisis Intervention Squads.

In the interim, we started the procurement process to acquire the latest in technology in preparation of full deployment for first-responder officers and sergeants citywide. The expanded body-worn camera program started rolling out citywide in April 2019.

Question 2: Why aren’t all shootings captured on body-worn cameras?

Phoenix Police

Answer: The Phoenix Police Department body-worn camera program has not always been widespread throughout the city. Prior to April 2019, the Phoenix Police Department body-worn camera program consisted of only 300 cameras.

The program is now being expanded to many as 2,000 new body-worn cameras to all first responding officers and supervisors, which should greatly increase the availability of video, should an OIS occur.

Phoenix Police does not deploy vehicle-mounted dash cameras.

Question 3: Where can I find the Police Department’s policies?

Phoenix Police

Answer: Download a copy of the PHX PD Operations Order Manual (Policies) (44 MB PDF)

 

 

Question 4: What changes will we see following the National Police Foundation study?

Phoenix Police

Answer: We are committed to taking concrete steps to implement each of the nine recommendations made by the National Police Foundation. This would include, but is not limited to, more detailed record keeping, more data made publicly available, more information shared via social media, and a stronger, safer community. It is our hope that you will see a more transparent and receptive police department as we work together with the community to reduce officer-involved shootings. Chief Williams publicly stated her intent to implement the nine recommendations in the study. (Download Chief Williams' Executive Summary) 103 KB PDF

Question 5: How much did the OIS Study cost?

Phoenix Police

Answer: The Phoenix City Council authorized $150,000 for the Phoenix Police Department to commission the study by the National Police Foundation. See also: Council Agenda items in the downloads subsection.

 

 

Question 6: How are officer-involved shootings investigated?

Phoenix Police

Answer: From the moment an officer advises that a shooting has taken place, we work to protect life, property, and preserve evidence. The scene is secured and preserved for responding investigators. Police Public Information Officers (PIOs) respond to gather as much information that can be released to the community in a timely manner, while also communicating with traditional media for critical messaging.

Two investigations run concurrently; a criminal investigation by the Phoenix Police Homicide Unit in partnership with the Maricopa County Attorney’s Office, and an internal investigation by the Phoenix Police Professional Standards Bureau. Two separate investigations are necessary to determine whether or not the shooting was within the law and within policy.

Our current protocols are based on policy, Arizona law (Phoenix Police Operations Orders, and Arizona Revised Statutes), and general best practices for police agencies.

Question 7: How can the public review all OIS incidents from the Phoenix Police Department?

Phoenix Police

Answer: To be transparent, public information about OIS incidents are posted to a digital dashboard on Phoenix's Open Data portal. The public can review the number of OIS incidents by incident year, by incident month and year, by day of week and year, by quarter and year, by precinct and year, or by Council District and year. Data is provided from January 2017 to the present. New data is added with regular updates. ​


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Related Links & Resources

Use Phoenix's Open​ D​​ata portal to explore Police-related data sets. You can also review links to related studies, learn about partner and support organizations, or learn about how to get involved and support the Phoenix Police Department in your neighborhood.

 

Phoenix Police Open Data

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Open Data: Phoenix PD OIS Dashboard

To be transparent, public information about OIS incidents are posted to a digital dashboard on Phoenix's Open Data portal. The public can review the number of OIS incidents by incident year, by incident month and year, by day of week and year, by quarter and year, by precinct and year, or by Council District and year. Data is provided from January 2017 to the present. New data is added with regular updates.

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Open Data: Phoenix PD Calls for Service

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Open Data: Phoenix PD UCR Crime Data

 

Related OIS Information

Collaborative Reform Process: Review of OIS in Las Vegas Police Department, 2012 (PDF)

Major Cities Chiefs: Independent Investigations of OIS, 2018: Current Practices and Recommendations from Law Enforcement Leaders in the United States and Canada (PDF)

PHX PD Operations Order Manual (Policies) (PDF)

 

Further Police Resources

Phoenix Law Enforcement Association (PLEA)

Phoenix Police Sergeants & Lieutenants Association (PPSLA)

Arizona Peace Officer Standards and Training Board (AZPOST)

National Police Foundation

Documents

Phoenix Police DepartmentIn June 2018 the Phoenix Police Department requested the City Council approve commissioning a study to examine the higher-than-normal rates of OIS incidents. The National Police Foundation (NPF), an independent non-partisan, non-profit organization, was chosen to conduct the study. On April 19, 2019 the report was released to the public and can be downloaded below, as well as the Police Chief’s Executive Summary highlighting the plan to implement the NPF’s recommendations.

Watch video from Council meeting or Download meeting documents


National Police Foundation OIS Study




Supporting Downloads

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