Pueblo Grande Calendar of Events

March 2018


ARCHEAOLOGY FOR KIDS
SATURDAY, MARCH 3
9:30 A.M. TO 12:30 P.M. 
COST: $15

Children ages 7 to 12 can become a Junior Archaeologist and discover the science of archaeology by doing a simulated excavation of a Hohokam pit house. Learn how to identify artifacts in the field, and discover how archaeologists use these artifacts to learn more about past cultures. Cost is $15; advanced registration is required by March 2. REGISTER TODAY!


PUEBLO GRANDE MUSEUM AUXILIARY PRESENTATION
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7
6:30 to 8 P.M.
FREE LECTURE


Join the Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary and Dr. Deni Seymour for her presentation The Earliest Apache in Arizona: Evidence of Arguments at Pueblo Grande Museum.

How did the Apache impact late prehistoric peoples? Research provides evidence of ancestral Apaches in the southern Southwest as early as A.D. 1300. Evidence comes from chronometric dates obtained from storage features (covered with grass or leaves), on Apache pottery, and from roasting pits, all in direct association with other types of Apache material culture. A continuous sequence of use from the A.D. 1300s through the late 1700s provides new insights into a western route into this region and the presence of the earliest ancestral Apache three centuries earlier than previously thought, even in areas where Coronado did not see them.

This event is free and open to the public, made possible by Arizona Humanities and Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary. Donations are welcome.

18th ANNUAL ANCIENT TECHNOLOGY DAY: PREHISTORIC & HISTORIC
SATURDAY, MARCH 10
9 A.M. TO 3 P.M.
FREE EVENT, MADE POSSIBLE BY A GRANT FROM ARIZONA HUMANITIES

 

Bring the whole family out for a day of hands-on fun! Test your hunting skills by tossing an atlatl (spear), discover the art and process of pottery making, basket weaving, loom spinning, flint knapping, and more! Taste roasted agave, cooked in the traditional way in an underground oven, and purchase some tasty frybread for lunch provided by Yellowman Frybread, a Navajo owned and operated food truck. They'll also be offering breakfast treats for the early risers.

Free arts and crafts activities are available for the kids! Enjoy various cultural, historic, and technology demonstrations throughout the day as well. Tours of the archaeological site, the Park of Four Waters, and artifact show-and-tell stations will also be available around the archaeological site and museum.

Ancient Technology Day is Scitech Signature Event, and a Arizona Archaeology and Heritage Month event.

ARIZONA ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY MEETING, PHOENIX CHAPTER
TUESDAY, MARCH 13
7:30 TO 9 P.M.
FREE LECTURE


Lecture by Dr. Todd Bostwick on "15,000 Years of Archaeology on Sicily: Cultural Crossroads of the Mediterranean "

The island of Sicily, located off the southern tip of Italy, has a rich archaeological heritage dating back more than 15,000 years. During the Upper Pleistocene, Sicily was connected to the mainland, allowing humans and animals to migrate to the region, and numerous caves contain their cave art. Later, Neolithic farmers made beautiful incised pottery and participated in extensive trade networks, including obsidian available from only two nearby islands. During the Bronze Age, thousands of tombs were cut into limestone cliffs, providing insight into ancient concepts of the afterlife. Arounde700 BC, substantial Phoenician and Greek colonies were established, which contain some the best preserved Greek temples in existence today. Roman ruins are also well represented, including the famous villa of Piazza Armerina, where hundreds of remarkable mosaic floors were preserved, depicting the daily life of Roman royalty.

More information on their website: azarchsoc.wildapricot.org.

BEHIND THE SCENES TOUR
THURSDAY, MARCH 15
10 TO 10:45 A.M.
COST: $5, DISCOUNT FOR MUSEUM MEMBERS 

Join collections staff for a "behind the scenes" tour of the museums' collection. Take an intimate tour of the lab, storage, and archival areas not open to the public. See how museums process, organize, and care for their collections.  Space is limited on a first come, first serve basis. Reserve your spot at the front desk.

PETROGLYPH DISCOVERY HIKE AT SOUTH MOUNTAIN 
SATURDAY, MARCH 17
9 TO 10 A.M.
COST: $5

Bring the whole family for a short one mile Hohokam petroglyph discovery hike at South Mountain for an easy but also petroglyph rich hiking experience. An experienced Museum guide will lead participants on a quick one-mile, one-hour interpretive hike, perfect for all ages and busy schedules. Space is limited. Advance registration required by March 16.  REGISTER FOR A HIKE TODAY!

DROP-IN DISCOVERY: BOW & ARROW PRODUCTION

SATURDAY, MARCH 17
10 TO NOON
INCLUDED WITH PAID MUSEUM ADMISSION

Did you know it takes three plants and a bird feather to make a bow? Drop by Royce Manuel's booth on the back patio of Pueblo grande Museum to discover which plants and which bird are used. Tell Royce two of the three local plants for a chance to shoot a primitive bow. Then learn how they are all processed and brought together to create these traditional primitive bows and arrows. This program is included with paid museum admission, made possible by the Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary.

BEHIND THE SCENES TOUR: STORIES POTS TELL
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21
10 TO 10:45 A.M.
COST: $5, DISCOUNT FOR MUSEUM MEMBERS 

Join the Museum’s Curator of Collections for a special "behind the scenes" look at pottery that’s not on display, to get a further understanding of the current changing exhibit Fragments: Broken Bowls Tell More Tales. You’ll get to see some of the staff’s favorite artifacts, and learn how archaeologists use pottery collections for research. Space is limited on a first come, first serve basis. Reserve your spot at the front desk. Tour fee is in addition to Museum Admission.


PARK OF FOUR WATER TOURS
FRIDAY, MARCH 30
10 TO 11 A.M.
COST: $5, DISCOUNT FOR MUSEUM MEMBERS    

The Park of Four Waters tour will take you through undeveloped, natural desert to the ruins of two Hohokam canal segments.  “Hohokam” is an archaeological term for an ancestral Native American culture who built a highly sophisticated irrigation canal network in Arizona roughly between A.D. 450 and 1450.  In order to support many large villages and small settlements, the Hohokam irrigated tens of thousands of acres along the Salt River to grow corn, beans, squash and cotton. This is a first come, first serve tour. Space is limited; sign up at the front desk.