​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ Drought Pipeline Drought Pipeline ​


 

Project Overview

The Drought Pipeline Project is essential to the economic health and vitality of Phoenix.  This project will ensure all residents have access to safe, reliable, clean drinking water during future times of shortage on the Colorado River.​

As part of this project, the city will update and replace existing infrastructure and install new infrastructure needed to serve all customers, no matter where they live or work in the city's service territory.

At this time, there are two independent, but related, pipeline projects in the neighborhood near 20th Street and Lincoln and the Phoenix Mountain Preserve. One is the immediate rehab/replacement of an existing 48-inch water pipeline. The second project is the installation of a 66-inch water pipeline. ​

We Welcome Questions and Comments!

​• Call us at 602-235-2666
• Email WaterWorks@Phoenix.gov

Note when you submit an email it falls under the city's policy which states that the email message is: (1) subject to public disclosure under the Public Records Law, (2) is not private or confidential and (3) is retained for 90 days. You may access internet-enabled computers for free at any Phoenix Public Library location.​
 

​Current Status

On January 29, 2020, the  Phoenix City Council unanimously approved an Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) with the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) for permanent use of a right-of-way next to the SR-51 freeway as an alternative route for the 66-inch pipeline. 

Phoenix Water will provide updates on the agreement with ADOT as more information is available. Construction on the 66-inch pipeline is not expected to start until fall 2020, and will take approximately two years to complete. 

Construction for the rehabilitation/replacement 48-inch pipeline will begin in March 2020. This pipeline must be repaired/replaced as soon as possible to avoid failure of the pipe, which carries 35 million gallons of tap water a day to North Phoenix​​. ​
 

Video Updates


Watch & Learn: City of Phoenix and ADOT Finalize Agreement for New Alignment 


Phoenix.gov/DroughtPipeline      What is the Drought Pipeline Project
Watch​ & Learn: 48-Inch Pipeline Project       Watch & Learn: 66-Inch Pipeline Project


48-Inch Pipeline Replacement and 66-Inch Pipeline Installation Route Map:

​​

​Phoenix Water Supply

North Phoenix residents (approximately 400,000 people) are served exclusively by Colorado River water treated at two water treatment plants. The proposed 66-inch pipeline will be used to alleviate the effects of drought, by ensuring that water supplies from the Salt and Verde Rivers are available to north Phoenix during future shortage on the Colorado River. ​

See if you receive Colorado River Water or Salt and Verde River Water.

Water Service Providers  

Learn more about Phoenix's water supply.    

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​Outreach

Phoenix Water has met with the Phoenix City Council, stakeholder groups, and residents for awareness and feedback on the Drought Pipeline Project. ​

Phoenix Water​​ also mailed 923 meeting invitations to the October 24th Open House, placed 923 door hangers in neighborhoods around the project, and placed signage in Granada Park and the preserve's major access points. 

​Council Meetings/Actions and Presentations:

  • ​​​Wednesday, January 15, 2020 - ​City of Phoenix Land Use and Livability Subcommittee

  • Friday, October 25, 2019 - Presentation at District 1 breakfast meeting

  • Wednesday, October 2, 2019 - City of Phoenix Transportation, Infrastructure, & Innovation Subcommittee meeting

  • Wednesday, October 3, 2018 - Program Manager contract presented to and adopted by the Phoenix City Council

  • Wednesday, December 5, 2018 - Individual Design and Construction contracts presented to and adopted by the Phoenix City Council​​​

Meetings with Stakeholder Groups:
  • ​​Thursday, October 24, 2019 - City of Phoenix Parks and Recreation Board presentation

  • Wednesday, October 7, 2019 - Phoenix Mountains Preservation Council meeting

  • Monday, September 16, 2019 - Phoenix Sonoran Preserves and Mountain Parks/Preserves Committee meeting

  • November 2017 - Phoenix Sonoran Preserves and Mountain Parks/Preserves Committee meeting

Community Meetings:

  • ​Friday, December 27, 2019 - Walking tour along the proposed alignment with Councilwoman Debra Stark, City engineers and residents

  • Wednesday, October 16, 2019 - Walking tour along the proposed alignment with City engineers and residents

  • Tuesday, October 15, 2019 - Walking tour along the proposed alignment with City engineers and residents

Public Meetings:

  • Thursday, October 24, 2019 - Public meeting at Madison Heights Elementary School (more than 350 people in attendance)

  • February 4, 2020 - Open House - 9 a.m. - 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. - 7 p.m. Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Cathedral 

Upcoming Meetings:

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Frequently Asked Questions (F.A.Q.)

Learn more about the 66 inch drought pipeline project and the 48-inch rehab/replacement pipeline project.


Question 1: What is the Phoenix Drought Pipeline Project?

Answer: The Drought Pipeline Project is essential to the economic health and vitality of Phoenix. This project will ensure all residents have access to safe, reliable, clean drinking water during future times of shortage on the Colorado River.​

As part of this project, the city will update and replace existing infrastructure and install new infrastructure needed to serve all customers, no matter where they live or work in the city's service area.

At this time, there are two independent, but related, pipeline projects in the neighborhood near 20th​ Street and Lincoln Drive and the Preserve. The first project is the immediate rehab/replacement of an existing 48-inch water pipe. The second project is the installation of a 66-inch water pipeline. ​

Question 2: What does the project entail?

Answer: The Drought Pipeline Project has multiple phases (see F.A.Q.'s 6, 7 & 8), with several projects slated for each phase. Phoenix Water will rehabilitate/replace an existing 48” pipeline, install a 66” pipeline, and make upgrades and improvements to the 24th St. Water Treatment Plant. The project begins near 20th Street and Maryland Avenue and will culminate at 32nd Street and Bell Road. Construction, start to finish, will take approximate​ly three years.​ However, impacts to individual neighborhoods will be much shorter, depending on the phase of construction.


Question 3: What is the 48-inch Pipeline Project?

Answer: This project is the rehabilitation, replacement, and relocation of an existing 48-inch pre-stressed concrete cylinder pipeline originally installed in 1974, that is showing evidence of radial instability and near/imminent failure. Phoenix City Council has already approved the design and construction contracts for this pipeline, and construction is expected to begin in March 2020.

In 2003, Phoenix Water began its transmission main assessment program with a focus on assessing all 160 miles of prestressed concrete cylinder pipe (PCCP) in its system.  To date, the c​ity has assessed more than half of its PCCP and has established a program to complete the assessment of all PCCP before 2030.  In May 2018, an inspection of the 48-inch main from the 24th Street Water Treatment Plant to 26th Street and Shea Boulevard identified pipes with longitudinal cracking.  Longitudinal cracks are evidence of radial instability and are indicative of near/imminent failure (see below photos). The assessment concluded that this section of 48” pipe is “the most distressed inspected [PCCP Main] in the City of Phoenix distribution system.”​

​  ​​

More detail on City Council Approvals: On May 16, 2018 the Phoenix City Council authorized staff to enter into contracts for evaluation, design services, construction administration and inspection services, as well as construction manager at risk design phase services for relocation and rehabilitation of the 48-inch pre-stressed concrete cylinder pipeline that runs through the neighborhood and Preserve. On September 18, 2019 the Phoenix City Council authorized staff to enter into a contract for construction manager at risk construction services for the relocation and rehabilitation of the existing 48-inch pipeline.  

Question 4: What is the 66-inch Pipeline Project?

Answer: This project is the construction and installation of a new pipeline from the 24th Street Water Treatment Plant to 32nd Street and Bell Road. This pipeline allows the city to deliver Salt and Verde River water to areas of North Phoenix that are currently entirely dependent on Colorado River water. This project is expected to begin construction in fall 2020. 

On January 29, 2020, the Phoenix City Council unanimously approved an Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) with the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) for permanent use of a right-of-way next to the SR-51 freeway as an alternative route for the 66-inch pipeline. This new alignment would head north from Myrtle Avenue up 20th Street to Orangewood, and then follow the ADOT right-of-way along State Route 51 to the preserve boundary. If this purchase happens, there will be no construction on 22nd Street for the 66-inch pipeline. This proposed route would also mean that Phoenix Water would not need to go through the Phoenix Mountain Preserve at 22nd Street. However, Phoenix Water will still be installing the pipeline in the preserve along State Route 51 up through the Dreamy Draw Road alignment. At this point, Phoenix Water would still need to go further into the preserve under the existing and previously disturbed bike path to avoid the dam located in this area. 

Details on City Council Approvals:​ On October 3, 2018 the Phoenix City Council authorized staff to enter into a contract for program management and possible construction administration and inspection services for the 66-inch pipeline project. On December 5, 2018 the Phoenix City Council authorized staff to enter into six contracts related to the 66-inch pipeline project for construction manager at risk preconstruction services as well as design and construction administration and inspection services.

Question 5: How is it being funded?

Answer: At nearly $300 million, the Drought Pipeline Project is the largest Capital Improvement Project Phoenix Water will fund with revenue generated from the 2019/2020 Phoenix City Council approved water rate increase.

Question 6: What is Phase 1 of the Drought Pipeline Project?

Answer: Phase one of the Drought Pipeline Project starts at the 24th Street Water Treatment Plant (24th and Lincoln) and the surrounding neighborhood. In this neighborhood, the city is rehabilitating/replacing a 48-inch pipeline in March 2020, and in fall 2020, installing the 66-inch pipeline. 

Potential impacts during Phase 1 include, but are not limited to: temporary traffic and access restrictions and construction noise during business hours. Granada Park will also experience temporary closures of tennis courts and limited parking restrictions. Homes will not be impacted during construction. Phoenix Water's outreach team will work with property owners who will be affected by construction and they'll communicate any temporary restrictions during construction. 

Question 7: What is Phase 2 of the Drought Pipeline Project?

Answer: Phase 2 of the Drought Pipeline Project continues the installation of the 66-inch pipeline. Construction will begin at the southern edge of the Phoenix Mountains Preserve on the eastside of the SR-51; continue north to the entrance of the Dreamy Draw Park; head east through a portion of the preserve previously disturbed; and continue along the bike path north to a crossing at the SR-51.​ Phoenix Water is working with the Parks and Recreation Department to coordinate dates of construction in order to identify what portions can remain open as work progresses. The city's goal is to phase trail closures, so as many as possible can remain open throughout construction.

Construction in the Preserve, south of Dreamy Draw Drive, is scheduled for February 2021 through fall 2021. Construction north of Dreamy Draw Drive is planned for February 2021 through the spring of 2022. Heavy construction will occur during the summer months—non-peak season at the Phoenix Mountains Preserve. 

The main impact(s) will be hiking and biking trail closures and/or restricted access. Trees, shrubs, and rocks will be removed and replaced or re-planted after the construction work is completed. Phoenix Water is working with the Parks and Recreation Department, Desert Botanical Garden, and preservation experts to ensure the Preserve is kept in acceptable conditions. There will be NO BLASTING in the preserve.    

Question 8: What is Phase 3 of the Drought Pipeline Project?

Answer: Phase 3 will consist of tunnel boring (digging several feet below ground) to cross under SR-51. Construction at the SR-51 Crossing is scheduled for late 2021 through late 2022. Construction will take place at the SR-51 at 29th Street to the intersection of 32nd Street & Northern Avenue and will continue on 32nd Street north to Bell Road. SR-51 will not be impacted, but there will be some traffic and access road restrictions.​ More information will be available in 2021.

Question 9: How is the city addressing traffic?

Answer: Phoenix Water will use various methods to inform the public about traffic restrictions, such as construction notices, street signs, electronic sign messaging, construction flaggers, the Phoenix Water website, and the Phoenix Streets Transportation Department website.​ Phoenix Water will repave the streets where construction work occurs. Any landscaping impacted during construction will be replaced.

Question 10: Will I know about these potential impacts?

Answer: Residents can learn more about potential construction impacts by attending future open houses and public meetings (see Community Outreach section). Construction notices will be sent to residents ahead of construction, and signage will be posted in the area. A 24-hour construction hotline number is available at 602-235-2666. Residents can also visit Phoenix.gov/water or email questions to waterworks@phoenix.gov.​​​​

Question 11: Where can I find more information on water Capital Improvement Projects in my neighborhood​?

Answer: Phoenix.gov/WaterWorks​ ​​​


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We welcome questions and comments!

• Call us at 602-235-2666
• Email WaterWorks@Phoenix.gov

Note when you submit an email it falls under the city's policy which states that the email message is: (1) subject to public disclosure under the Public Records Law, (2) is not private or confidential and (3) is retained for 90 days. You may access internet-enabled computers for free at any Phoenix Public Library location.

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Question 11: X?

Answer: Text goes here Phoenix.gov/WaterWorks​ ​

Question 12: X?

Answer: Text goes here Phoenix.gov/WaterWorks​ ​

Question 13: X?

Answer: Text goes here Phoenix.gov/WaterWorks​ ​

Question 14: X?

Answer: Text goes here Phoenix.gov/WaterWorks​ ​

Question 15: X?

Answer: Text goes here Phoenix.gov/WaterWorks​ ​​​​