​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

 

 

Phoenix Digital Divide Solution, 'PHX DECC' Connects 250K Familieshttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/ced/2037Community and Economic Development8/25/2021 7:00:00 AMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2037/NEWSROOM_CED_08001.jpgPhoenix Digital Divide Solution, 'PHX DECC' Connects 250K Families<div class="ExternalClass5C96200D317D459EBDE09E25BB885261"><html> <p>Deployed as a digital divide solution, the Phoenix Digital Education Connection Canopy is a replicable network connecting students to schoolwork and virtual classrooms in Phoenix, Arizona.<br></p><p style="text-align:center;"><em>By Eric Jay Toll for PHX Newsroom</em><br></p> <p>“It’s the silver lining from the pandemic cloud,” said Laura Pastor, Phoenix city councilwoman, whose district includes many of the city’s digitally underserved neighborhoods. “Children will no longer need to sit in library parking lots or coffee shops to access high-speed broadband to do their homework.”</p> <p>The COVID-19 health emergency closed schools, libraries and community centers, sending students to learn from home. Realizing that more than 250,000 families did not have access or adequate internet speeds to go to school or complete assignments, city and education officials clamored for a digital divide solution.</p> <p>“Overcoming challenges is in Phoenix’s DNA,” said Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego. “This is a great example of how, by looking at things differently, we can produce innovative solutions that highlight Phoenix as a top-tier city. PHX DECC is a cost-effective, collaborative, digital divide solution we’re proud to champion.”</p> <p>In a nearly 18-month effort, the concept, the testing and the reality came together with a scalable digital divide solution connecting students to virtual classrooms, conferences, homework assignments and curated school resources.</p> <p>It all started at Phoenix College with just four words</p> <p>Pastor had a lead role in bringing together the consortium to engineer and deploy the PHX DECC. In her unique position as a city councilwoman in America’s fifth-largest city and employed full-time as the community liaison for Phoenix Community College, Pastor is also an elected member of the Phoenix Union High School District Governing Board. She leveraged her connections pushing forward a digital divide solution.</p> <p>“Paul Ross and I were called into (then Phoenix College President Larry Johnson Jr.’s) office. He gave us a simple charge,” she said. “He said, ‘Solve the digital divide.’”</p> <p>Ross, Phoenix College Associate Vice President and CIO, came up with the idea of using existing technology and applications to create a digital canopy over a school district connecting students to virtual classrooms, homework assignments and schools’ digital resources over an accessible, no-cost, wireless high-speed intranet.</p> <p>“I first had the idea in 2016 in Ohio, again in 2017 in Washington, and I couldn’t get any traction on the idea of solving the digital divide with existing technology,” said Ross. “With the coming of the pandemic, this was no longer just something occurring in pockets; the ability to connect was affecting everyone, everywhere.”</p> <p>Able to tap into the cross-agency resources, Pastor built the collaboration.</p> <p>“I didn’t know how to solve the digital divide,” she said. “But I knew where to find those who would. I knew the city would have money from the CARES Act, as with the school districts in the college. If everybody contributed, we would have the know-how, the commitment and the money to make it happen.”</p> <p>Once the challenge of ensuring access to classrooms and education resources was on the table, the walls between the city, education, business and the telecommunications industry disappeared.</p> <p>“It is in the best interest of the city to make this a sustainable city at the end of the day, so you want to make sure that you have a level playing field for all of your families,” said Christine Mackay, director, Phoenix Community and Economic Development. “That means they all have access to a quality education so that they can find good jobs. That’s really what you want for all of your citizens.”</p> <p>She said that the telecommunications industry and business community were committed to a long-term solution for all our student’s educational opportunities. </p> <p>An investment in the workforce of the future</p> <p>As America’s fastest-growing large city, Phoenix is a magnet for growing companies and a steadily increasing demand for workers.</p> <p>“From an economic development standpoint, we couldn’t take a chance that we would have any gaps in our future workforce,” said Mackay. “We’ve really worked diligently across all sectors to create a place that makes Phoenix Arizona a great destination for high-wage technology-related businesses that we hadn’t seen before. They are really attracted to the workforce that we have.”</p> <p>The key is off-the-shelf technology</p> <p>No special consultants, no proprietary hardware; the charge was to make the solution fit maintenance and upkeep within existing school district budgets.</p> <p>Ross said the key to making it happen was thorough research. And he invested hundreds of hours reading specification sheets and testing off-the-shelf equipment. He had the makings for PHX DECC: free broadband connecting students to schools in a scalable concept and economically efficient solution. </p> <p>On paper, Ross and Pastor were holding a recipe for a solution to the digital divide.</p> <p>Finding a long-term solution</p> <p>“We have significant information about our students,” said Dr. Chad Gestson, superintendent of the Phoenix Union High School District. “We have a staggering number who live with food insecurity. (So we know) the students who live without access to resources, and they certainly live without access to technology.”</p> <p>Gestson said the priority was getting high-speed school access to families with a permanent solution.</p> <p>“Through the willing businesses, students could access WiFi in coffee shops; they could log on to the Internet near libraries and some public buildings,” said Gestson. “These are short-term solutions.”</p> <p>The pandemic showed that even the short-term solutions had significant problems.</p> <p>“When the pandemic hit, all students were sent home, and so were their parents,” said Ross. “This meant that the household internet connection was being used by parents for work and multiple students for school. There wasn’t the capacity for everyone at the same time. Plus, businesses that normally provided WiFi for students were also closed, and many turned off their wireless networks.”</p> <p>Pastor noted that the problem existed in her own home, where she juggled the role of parent, employee, board member and council member. </p> <p>“We had internet connection issues with all the video conferences and virtual classes,” she said.”</p> <p>For thousands of families, trying to go to school from home was impossible. They didn’t have food on the table, let alone a high-speed internet connection. Sitting in a parking lot at closed libraries and recreation centers helped, but it was not a solution for doing homework.</p> <p>It wasn’t just pockets here and there</p> <p>Ross observed that the pandemic highlighted digital divide problems that weren’t just scattered pockets in rural America. </p> <p>“Almost everyone with a student at home was impacted in some way by demands for bandwidth,” he said. “That was when we decided it was time to take the theory and test it in practice.”</p> <p>Phoenix wasn’t the only municipality facing the challenge. Other cities and organizations have attempted solutions. Reports say that costs skyrocketed, and the numbers served were limited. The answer coming from Phoenix College would serve 250,000 families for far less than other systems. Using off-the-shelf equipment, school districts could take on the system maintenance within their budgets. </p> <p>Micro concept tested with college students</p> <p>With seed money from the city of Phoenix, Ross put a test installation into play at Phoenix College. Students at the campus participated in the test, taking courses, doing schoolwork and tapping into resources. The microconcept was a resounding success.</p> <p>In summer 2020, the phase I deployment started. </p> <p>“We needed to blanket the school districts. I can tell you more about every pole under the (PHX DECC) canopy than anyone,” said Ross. “I walked neighborhoods; I talked to people; I checked out all the locations. I knew this would work.”</p> <p>The goal was to be ready for the start of the 2021-22 school year. The program goes live on September 1 in three school districts: Phoenix Union High School District and Alhambra and Cartwright elementary school districts.</p> <p>A public effort supported by business and the private telecom industry</p> <p>The WiFi canopy for the schools required security, high-speed broadband capacity, and individual districts’ ability to manage cost and maintenance within existing technology capabilities. PHX DECC delivers all three solutions. It required financial backing to make it possible, that’s where Phoenix played a major role.</p> <p>“ARPA and the CARES Act provide necessary federal funding to invest in a res​​ilient, strong future that will last for generations,” said Gallego. “Investing those monies into PHX DECC will create a more connected community and deliver the critical results our city needs.”<br></p> <p>The canopy connects students and parents to virtual classrooms and conferences, homework assignments, and school-curated resources. It does not provide unfettered access to the Internet.</p> <p>Telecommunication companies generally oppose cities and educational institutions offering broadband services. With PHX DECC, the Southwest Telecommunications Association is supporting the effort.</p> <p>“The cable communications industry supports this effort. We don’t want to see government entities competing with private businesses; this system does not compete,” said Susan Bitter Smith, Executive Director of the Southwest Cable Communications Association. “The Association understood the communities’ needs and the (PHX DECC)’s unique connection of student to classroom is giving underserved communities the help they need.”</p> <p>Affordable, attainable, scalable PHX DECC</p> <p>“We wanted something that any educational organization could use,” Ross said. </p> <p>Instead of issuing a blank check, the collaborative effort kept in focus the cost of maintaining the PHX DECC system.</p> <p>“We didn’t want districts to have to hire outside vendors with specialist costs to maintain the system,” said Pastor. “We wanted the districts to be able to integrate the maintenance into existing budgets and capabilities. We succeeded.”</p> <p>That controlled cost and using existing equipment make the system scalable and transferable to school districts anywhere. Ross is genuinely excited about what this means up and down the education ladder.</p> <p>“We are creating a program here at Phoenix College that trains our technology students,” he said.  They learn how to install, maintain and operate (PHX DECC), which can help them find jobs with schools locally or anywhere this system will be installed.”</p> <p>Those involved in the entire process say they almost get goosebumps thinking about how PHX DECC is a life-changing technology for families. </p> <p>“Our entire community is very excited that we’ve become involved in this intergovernmental effort to solve the digital divide,” said Gestson. “Once we roll out this network, our staff and faculty will truly be able to keep students engaged on nights and weekends. For our students, they are very excited.”</p> <p>Gestson said, “In this highly technological world, tech access should not be a privilege; it should be a right.”</p> <p>PHX DECC Phase I goes live on September 1.​<br></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevNewscedCED
Small Biz Gets Big Opportunity with Phoenix Firehouse FastPITCHhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/ced/1983Community and Economic Development7/9/2021 10:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1983/NEWSROOM_CED_2107001.jpgSmall Biz Gets Big Opportunity with Phoenix Firehouse FastPITCH<div class="ExternalClass24D85E6BF0254D68ACD4D91D35F47D64"><html> <span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">A one-of-a-kind redevelopment opportunity for a full-service restaurant on the edge of Hance Park is coming from the city of Phoenix. The former firehouse at the corner First and Moreland streets will soon be open for lease, redevelopment and operation as a full-service restaurant. The firehouse is the only restaurant site that directly connects to the reimagined park.<br></span><br> <p style="text-align:center;"><em style="font-size:13.3333px;text-align:center;">​B</em><em style="font-size:13.3333px;text-align:center;"><em>y</em> Eric Jay Toll for the PHX Newsroom</em>​<br></p><p>Small businesses have a chance to be part of a team that proposes to adapt the firehouse into a restaurant. Development and restaurateur proposers will be required to reach out to small businesses for goods, services, food, equipment, furniture and more. Making it easy for small businesses to introduce themselves to  proposing teams, Phoenix is hosting the Firehouse FastPITCH.</p> <p>This unique opportunity places small businesses center stage to make quick pitches to an audience of proposing teams at one time. Then development teams have the opportunity to discuss the potential for small businesses to join their proposals to the city to create the next Phoenix dining hot spot.</p> <p>Additional information about the Firehouse FastPITCH and the upcoming Request for Proposals are on the<a href="https://phoenix.gov/econdev/firehouse-fastpitch" target="_blank"> Firehouse Restaurant​</a> website. <br></p> <p> <strong>FastPITCH Information Session </strong> <br> </p> <p>Tuesday, July 20th at 9:00 a.m.:  Phoenix will host a virtual information session for small businesses or restaurateurs to learn how to fine-tune their pitch, ask questions and be ready for the Firehouse FastPITCH. </p> <p>Tuesday, July 20th at 10:00 a.m.:  Potential proposers can attend a virtual information session for information about the required small business outreach. </p> <p>Registration for the FastPITCH Information Session is required and can be found on the <a target="_blank" href="https://phoenix.gov/econdev/firehouse-fastpitch">Firehouse Restaurant website</a>. <br></p> <p> <strong>The Firehouse FastPITCH</strong> <br> </p> <p>Potential proposers will fill the seats, and small businesses or restaurateurs will take the stage to make their pitch to the entire group at one time in Phoenix City Hall, Thursday, August 12th. Only pre-registered businesses or proposers will be eligible to attend. Registration will open July 21st and close on August 6th.</p> <p>Requests for Proposal</p> <p>Later this year, Phoenix will issue a formal request for proposals to lease, adaptively reuse the building, complete improvements and operate a full-service restaurant in the former firehouse. The RFP will follow normal city processes, including the transparency process.</p> <p>For more information, answers to frequently asked questions, and additional resources, please visit the <a target="_blank" href="https://phoenix.gov/econdev/firehouse-fastpitch">Firehouse Restaurant website.​</a><br></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevNewscedCED
City Seeks Proposals for Development in Growing Sector of Cityhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/ced/1965Community and Economic Development6/24/2021 4:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1965/14th Street and Jefferson.JPGCity Seeks Proposals for Development in Growing Sector of City<div class="ExternalClass8BD18C46794A4B0E81B7F448AA5D649A"><html> <p>​<span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">The city of Phoenix is accepting proposals to lease and develop a 7-parcel site in a vibrant, fast-growing area of the city.</span></p> <p>The site, located between 14<sup>th</sup> and 15<sup>th</sup> Streets along Jefferson Street, is in the Eastlake Park Neighborhood, which has a mix of historic properties, single-family and multi-family homes, and is home to one of Phoenix's oldest parks, Eastlake Park.</p> <p>“This site is a truly unique opportunity for the developer, the city and our community," said Christine Mackay, Community and Economic Development Director.  “A great project with mixed uses and mixed-income housing options to complement this location in the Eastlake Park Neighborhood and along light rail will add to the vibrancy, diversity and livability of this distinctive downtown community." </p> <p>The site is zoned for high-density development and is near light rail stations that connect within minutes to shopping, the airport, universities and community colleges and employment opportunities.</p> <p style="text-align:justify;">The official Request for Proposals (RFP) was posted at <a href="http://phoenix.gov/solicitations" target="_blank">phoenix.gov/solicitations</a> on June 18, 2021. The pre-proposal meeting will be conducted at 10 a.m. on June 30, 2021, and proposals are due by 2 p.m. on August 17, 2021. The City's Solicitation Transparency Policy is now in effect for this business opportunity. Please contact the procurement officer at <a href="mailto:procurement.request.ced@phoenix.gov" target="_blank">procurement.request.ced@phoenix.gov</a> with questions.​<br></p> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevNewscedCED
Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.: PHXisBio.comhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/ced/1941Community and Economic Development6/9/2021 11:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1941/BIO-20210608-Phx-Is-Bio-Thumbnail.jpghttps://youtu.be/wMA9blusmSsPhoenix, Arizona, U.S.: PHXisBio.com<div class="ExternalClassC5F5D19D79294B71A34935D8B0C25E37"><html> <p></p><p><span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span>Phoenix, Arizona is the 5th largest city in the nation, the fastest growing for 5 years in a row and ranked 5th in the Nation as an Emerging Life Science Market. Phoenix innovators are setting the standard for precision medicine and driving translational discovery.  Phoenix's unprecedented growth in the life sciences is fueled by over $3.25 billion in capital investment which has led to over 5 million square feet of new bioscience healthcare facilities constructed since 2019.  We invite YOU to join us!​<span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span></p></html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevVideocedCED
Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.: The Phoenix Biomedical Campus - BiomedicalPhoenix.comhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/ced/1942Community and Economic Development6/9/2021 11:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1942/BIO-20210608-PBC-Thumbnail.jpghttps://youtu.be/JxG5gfODrkEPhoenix, Arizona, U.S.: The Phoenix Biomedical Campus - BiomedicalPhoenix.com<div class="ExternalClass16DFB6E8E7B3463295160AD5B0960DCE"><html> <p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span><span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span>Phoenix, Arizona is the 5th largest city in the nation, the fastest growing for 5 years in a row and ranked 5th in the Nation as an Emerging Life Science Market. Phoenix innovators are setting the standard for precision medicine and driving translational discovery.  Phoenix's unprecedented growth in the life sciences is fueled by over $3.25 billion in capital investment which has led to over 5 million square feet of new bioscience healthcare facilities constructed since 2019.  At the heart of this growth is a 30-acre urban life sciences center - the Phoenix Biomedical Campus (PBC).  It boasts the highest concentration of research scientists and complementary research professionals in the region. We invite YOU to join us!​<span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span><span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span>​</p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevVideocedCED
Phoenix Tops the Nation in Population Growth for the Fifth Year in a Rowhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/ced/1927Community and Economic Development6/1/2021 3:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1927/NEWSROOM_CED_210020.jpgPhoenix Tops the Nation in Population Growth for the Fifth Year in a Row<div class="ExternalClassD5422711C3DD4ACFB5653362CC40553F"><html> <p>​<span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">Say “hi” to 25,194 new neighbors. They pushed Phoenix way out in front making this the fifth year in a row that the city is America’s fastest-growing.</span><br></p> <p>The 25,194 new Phoenix residents this year is slightly below the 10-year average of 25,912, however, Phoenix continues to take the largest share of Maricopa County’s population growth, with nearly four in 10 new county residents choosing to live in the city of Phoenix.<br></p> <p>The U.S. Census Bureau’s 2020 estimates say that Phoenix now tops 1.7 million in population and added more new residents than any other city. Phoenix’s growth rate, 1.5 percent lags behind the County’s 1.9 percent growth rate.<br></p> <p>The city is still the fifth-largest U.S. city behind New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and Houston, but population losses in Chicago and Los Angeles were about the same amount that Phoenix gained, according to the Census. New York City lost the equivalent of the population of Goodyear.<br></p> <p>Queen Creek topped Arizona in percentage population growth, 10.0 percent, with its population jumping from 55,000 in 2019 to 60,097 in 2020. That positioned the town with the seventh-fastest growing percentage in the U.S. Buckeye was second in Arizona with a 7 percent growth rate. <br></p> <p>Phoenix also leads the country in ten-year population growth, adding almost 260,000 people since 2010, an 18.1 percent population increase. San Antonio’s 234,000 10-year increase is second in the nation, also an 18.1 percent population jump.<br></p> <p>Although Phoenix would take decades to gain the 600,000 residents needed to pass Houston as the fourth-largest U.S. city, Houston’s growth rate has been flat since Hurricane Harvey in 2018. This year, the Texas city gained 400 residents. Chicago’s population losses, though, put Houston within striking distance of passing the Illinois city to be the nation’s third-largest city, if it returns to the pre-hurricane growth rate.<br></p> <p>Tucson is still Arizona’s second-largest city with its population growing 0.8 percent to 553,571, a gain of 4,610 people. Mesa, which was the 8th-ranked city for population gains, had a 1.9 percent growth, pushing the population to 528,129.  At that rate, they will overtake Tucson as the second largest city within five years.<br></p> <p>The next three most-populous Arizona cities are Chandler (265,398, up 1.6 percent), Scottsdale (262,647, also up 1.6 percent), and Gilbert (257,658, up 1.4 percent). In terms of percentage growth after Queen Creek and Buckeye, Marana and Casa Grande both grew 4.5 percent, and Maricopa and Goodyear both grew 4.4 percent.<br></p> <p>Phoenix added more people than 24 states, according to the Census estimates. Maricopa County added more population than 36 states. Phoenix’s population growth also exceeded Austin, Texas, and Denver, Colorado, combined growth numbers.<br></p> <p>Five of the ten cities gaining the most population were in Texas (San Antonio, Fort Worth, Austin, Frisco, McKinley), two were n Arizona, and the other three were Seattle, Charlotte and Denver.<br></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevNewscedCED
Maricopa County #1; Greater Phoenix #2: Fastest U.S. Metro Growth in 2020https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/ced/1887Community and Economic Development5/10/2021 10:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1887/NEWSROOM_CED_210016.jpgMaricopa County #1; Greater Phoenix #2: Fastest U.S. Metro Growth in 2020<div class="ExternalClass34C93A6ECF1B42EC845E6DB3DD56B398"><html> <p>​When the news gets out that Greater Phoenix is one of the top places in the nation to find a new job opportunity, people start heading to Arizona. Late in 2018 and early in 2019, that news started getting out in ranking after ranking. <br></p> <p style="text-align:center;"> <em>By Eric Jay Toll for the PHXNewsroom</em> <br> </p> <p>Job opportunities await and a new population follows. The jobs available today are filling roles in the expanding knowledge economy, and growing technology, bioscience and manufacturing sectors. The quality of life in Phoenix is making it easier for companies to recruit from other areas.</p> <p> <em>This is the second in a series of three articles about indicators showing exceptional growth in the Phoenix and Arizona economies. The first article, “<a target="_blank" href="/newsroom/ced/1880">Phoenix Tops Nation in April Small Business Wage Gains; Arizona is Third​</a>,” was published on May 5. The third article, about the number of new housing starts in Greater Phoenix and how it compares nationally, will publish later the week of May 17.</em> </p> <p>As of July 1, 2020, the U.S. Census Bureau estimated that the metro area population grew by an average of 291 people every day. Maricopa County saw its population climb by 86,820, more than any other U.S. county. The entire Phoenix-Mesa-Chandler metro area grew by an estimated 106,008 to 5.1 million people, the fastest pace of the top 10 metro areas.</p> <p>Census Bureau population estimates differ from the 2020 Decennial Census in that the estimates are calculated projections for the period from July 1, 2019, through June 30, 2020. </p> <p>Jobs and quality of life are the magnets drawing new populations. More than 80 percent of Arizona’s 2020 population increase moved into Greater Phoenix. Normally, between 67 percent and 70 percent of Arizona’s population lives in Phoenix. With more people moving to Phoenix, the more companies looking to expand are drawn to the area for its quality workforce.</p> <p>The metro posted a 2.1 percent population gain, the 16th fastest percentage nationally. Greater Phoenix remains the 10th most populous metro area. The three largest metro areas, New York City, Los Angeles and Chicago, all lost substantial populations in 2020 compared to 2019.</p> <p>The new population in the Phoenix metro was helped by a steady birthrate, 57,251, up from 56,978 in 2019. Bucking the national trend of a declining birth rate, Greater Phoenix held constant, with an average of 57,000 over the last five years. </p> <p>In 2020, Phoenix added 6,590 people who moved here from foreign countries. The global in-migration, however, was down from nearly 8,300 in 2019. The 2020 number is less than half the 15,575 who moved here from an international address in 2015. The remaining population increases came from other states or counties within Arizona. Metro-to-metro and state-to-state migration data are released late in the summer.</p> <p>City population estimates are expected around the end of May. Population estimates are calculated by the Census Bureau using sampling techniques, birth and death rates, and new housing unit starts. The estimates are not the same as the actual population count that makes up the decennial census. Decennial census data won’t be released until late in 2021. The first official 2020 Census data released, the reapportionment census, pegged the state’s population at 7.2 million. <br></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevNewscedCED
Phoenix Tops Nation in April Small Business Wage Gains; Arizona is Thirdhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/ced/1880Community and Economic Development5/5/2021 1:45:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1880/NEWSROOM_CED_210014.jpgPhoenix Tops Nation in April Small Business Wage Gains; Arizona is Third<div class="ExternalClassD11F5C61AAF0406C912804BB4853CFF3"><html> <p>P​hoenix topped the nation with a 5.67 percent hourly wage hike, based on one-month annualized wage growth data, in small businesses compared to a year ago, according to the monthly Small Business Employment Watch from Paychex IHS Markit.<br></p> <p style="text-align:center;"> <em>​By Eric Jay Toll for the PHXNewsroom</em> <br> </p> <p>The average metro area small business is currently paying wages of $28.26 per hour. The U.S. average is $29.09, increasing only 2.84 percent.  Arizona ranked third in wage growth, with a 4 percent increase over last year to $27.11. Missouri’s 4.84 percent growth was tops in the nation, and Georgia was second with 4.4 percent. Wages rose more in the Northeast, up 3.7 percent, followed by 2.94 percent in the West. The South lagged behind the other regions reporting a 2.09 percent wage gain for small business workers. </p> <p>Arizona and Phoenix, third among states and cities respectively, both placed third in the nation for small business job growth according to Paychex.  For Arizona, April 2021 saw small business job growth of 4.9 percent over April 2020.  Greater Phoenix clocked similar growth with a 4.6 percent increase during that time.</p> <p>Nationally, job gains in April marked the first month in the last 12 in which all regions of the country showed positive growth rates. The West led the regional list with 4.26 percent in job gains. The Midwest was the lowest with a 3.31 percent job gain. According to Paychex, the national average for job gains is 3.92 percent.</p> <p>Phoenix’s performance has been relatively strong across the last year. After April and May 2020, when jobs plummeted because of the pandemic lockdown, Phoenix was among the top five metro areas for job performance. Over the past year, Greater Phoenix saw fewer jobs lost than most metro areas. In months with job increases, Phoenix was among the leaders.</p> <p>The monthly Small Business Employment Watch from Paychex IHS Markit calculates job and wage gains based on the data generated by businesses using Paychex for payroll and human resource services. Over the past year, Phoenix has shown substantial numbers in both jobs and wage gains, holding a steady ranking among the top tier of metro areas measured by Paychex. <br></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevNewscedCED

 

 

Community and Economic DevelopmentPHXEconDevhttps://www.phoenix.gov/econdevCommunity and Economic DevelopmentcedCEDhttps://www.youtube.com/user/cityofphoenixazhttps://nextdoor.com/agency-detail/az/phoenix/city-of-phoenixPHXEcondevphoenixecondevTwitter

 

 

​Share this pageArchived Press Releases