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Central Avenue Closed at Salt River Bridge Next Three Weekendshttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/street-transportation/2374Street Transportation6/7/2022 10:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2374/Public_Transit_Newsroom_38.pngCentral Avenue Closed at Salt River Bridge Next Three Weekends<div class="ExternalClass158BB064CF12411DBC8319CADA4D0C8C"><html> <p>​​Construction crews are making progress on the <a target="_blank" href="https://www.valleymetro.org/project/south-central-extension-downtown-hub/">South Central Extension/Downtown Hub</a> light rail project. In addition to 5.5 miles of new track and eight stations, the project also includes upgrades to existing infrastructure.</p> <p>Beginning Friday, June 10, crews will be reinforcing the Salt River Bridge to allow the historic structure to support light rail trains when the extension opens in 2024.<br></p> <p>To complete the work, the bridge will be closed to motorists during June weekends:</p> <p></p> <ul style="" class="" dir=""><li>10 p.m. Friday, June 10 to 5 a.m. Monday, June 13<br></li><li>10 p.m. Friday, June 17 to 5 a.m. Monday, June 20<br></li><li>10 p.m. Friday, June 24 to 5 a.m. Monday, June 27</li></ul> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>During those three weekends, Central Avenue will be closed south of Watkins Street to Rio Salado Scenic Drive. Motorists may use 7th Avenue or 7th Street to cross the Salt River. Additionally, all bus stops along Central Avenue between Buckeye and Broadway roads will be closed. </p><p><a target="_blank" href="https://valley-metro-vulcan.nyc3.cdn.digitaloceanspaces.com/projects/downloads/south-central-extension-downtown-hub/construction-notices/CB_20220603_Salt-River-Bridge-Work_Detour-Notice_English.pdf">View the closure notice and detour map</a><br></p> <p>To stay updated on the latest construction information, download the <a target="_blank" href="https://drupal-space.nyc3.cdn.digitaloceanspaces.com/s3fs-public/uploads/event-resources/construct_vm_app_qr_code_directions.pdf">Construct VM - South Central app</a> or visit <a target="_blank" href="https://www.valleymetro.org/project/south-central-extension-downtown-hub/">ValleyMetro.org/SouthCentral​</a>.​<br></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/streetsNewsstreet-transportationStreets
$7M in Federal Funds will Improve Safety at Two Phoenix Railroad Crossingshttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/street-transportation/2366Street Transportation6/3/2022 1:00:00 AMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2366/19th Ave and McDowell RR crossing (Newsroom crop).jpg$7M in Federal Funds will Improve Safety at Two Phoenix Railroad Crossings<div class="ExternalClass1D07A878B4B74C3181D63ABAC3833F7E"><html> <p>​​The Federal Railroad Administration announced on Thursday that $7.1 million in Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and Safety Improvements (CRISI) grant program funds will support proposed upgrades to the railroad crossings at 43rd Avenue and Camelback Road and 19th Avenue and McDowell Road. In addition to the grant funding, the City of Phoenix will provide a 30 percent match toward the projects.<br></p> <p>Improvements to be made to these two complex and heavily trafficked railroad crossings will include installation of gate arms, signalization and increased sidewalk width for Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliance, as well as minor road upgrades including realignment of traffic signals and widening. Both crossings currently are not protected by gate arms, just cantilevered signals.</p> <p>The money for these projects comes from the more than $368 million in CRISI grant funds allocated by the U.S. Department of Transportation this week to address 46 projects in 32 states. These investments will play a crucial role in modernizing the nation's rail infrastructure and strengthening supply chains, and help to reduce congestion and get people and goods where they need to go quickly and more affordably.<br></p><p>CRISI funds projects that improve safety and railroad infrastructure, reduce congestion, relocate rail lines, conduct rail-related research, and enhance multi-modal connnections between rail and other modes of transport such as ports or intermodal facilities. <br></p> <p> <a href="https://www.transportation.gov/briefing-room/biden-administration-announces-over-368-million-grants-improve-rail-infrastructure" target="_blank">Read the full U.S. Department of Transportation Department CRISI grant program funds announcement</a> <br> </p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/streetsNewsstreet-transportationStreets
​7th Street Bridge Repair Honored with Public Works Awardhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/street-transportation/2322Street Transportation4/22/2022 10:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2322/7th St Bridge repair.jpg​7th Street Bridge Repair Honored with Public Works Award<div class="ExternalClass07F2C4045C274B2998961D7E5FE44E7F"><html> <p></p><p>​Last year's emergency repair of the 7th Street Salt River Bridge earned the City of Phoenix Street Transportation Department the American Public Works Association (APWA) 2022 Project Disaster or Emergency Construction Repair Award.</p><p><a href="/newsroom/street-transportation/1777" target="_blank">Following a gas utility line fire in February 2021</a>, approximately 40 percent of the structure was damaged and needed to be demolished and rebuilt. To minimize the impact of the closure of this major connection point between south Phoenix and downtown, crews worked through an expedited six-month reconstruction schedule and <a href="/newsroom/street-transportation/2043" target="_blank">reopened the bridge in August 2021</a>.</p><p><a href="https://youtu.be/FftUUIE_Bbw" target="_blank">Watch PHXTV coverage: 7th Street Bridge Reopens</a><br></p><p><a href="https://youtu.be/Df6hJw4RQxU" target="_blank">Watch time-lapse video of the demolition and construction project</a></p><p>Representatives from the Street Transportation Department, project contractor Hunter Contracting Co., and project consultant Kimley-Horn will be honored for this achievement at an awards ceremony held in conjunction with the APWA Public Works Expo in Charlotte, N.C., in August.</p><p>Visit <a href="/streets/7thstsaltriverbridge" target="_blank">Phoenix.gov/Streets/7thStSaltRiverBridge</a> to learn more about the project and view construction photos.</p><p>Interesting bridge reconstruction facts:</p><ul dir="" class="" style=""><li><p>20 new rebar-reinforced concrete girders were installed, each weighing 191,000 pounds</p></li><li><p>Repouring of the driving surface required 705 tons of concrete</p></li><li><p>The bridge deck was poured during one night in August 2021, requiring a convoy of more than 80 concrete trucks</p></li><li><p>Handrails along the entire bridge were replaced and updated to meet current safety standards</p></li><li><p>The new portion of the bridge has a 75-year lifespan​<br><br></p></li></ul> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/streetsNewsstreet-transportationStreets
Bike to Work Phoenix Event Set for April 20https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/street-transportation/2311Street Transportation4/15/2022 1:30:00 AMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2311/bike to work day promo image.jpgBike to Work Phoenix Event Set for April 20<div class="ExternalClass2CB3ABC3EF8D4DEDB9319A85AEE23E3E"><html> <p>​April is <a href="https://www.valleymetro.org/commute-solutions/valley-bike-month" target="_blank">Valley Bike Month​</a> and Wednesday, April 20 is the annual <a href="https://www.btwphx.com/" target="_blank">Bike to Work Phoenix</a> (BTWPhx) event. Expected to attract hundreds of participants, BTWPhx brings the cycling community together and celebrates the benefits of riding your bike to the office.</p><p>The City of Phoenix <a href="/streets" target="_blank">Street Transportation Department</a> is a supporting sponsor of this year's event, which features a group ride that starts at Park Central (3100 N. Central Avenue) at 7 a.m., and ends at the <a href="https://phoenixbiosciencecore.com/" target="_blank">Phoenix Bioscience Core​</a>​<span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> campus (850 N. 5th Street) around 7:30 a.m. Check in at Park Central begins at 6:30 a.m.<br></p><p>The ride is approximately 3 miles long and will travel along protect bike lanes and other paths that are safe and bike friendly. It ends with refreshments and giveaways, and the first 300 people to check in will receive free breakfast and a BTWPhx t-shirt. All participants will be entered into a drawing for a chance to win a <a href="https://lectricebikes.com/" target="_blank">Lectric eBike</a> and other prizes.<br></p><p>Learn more and register by visiting <a href="https://www.btwphx.com/" target="_blank">btwphx.com</a>.</p><p>Those who don't want to participate in the group ride can create their own route and meet the group at the <a href="https://phoenixbiosciencecore.com/" target="_blank">Phoenix Bioscience Core​</a>​ campus​<span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> at 7:30 a.m. A variety of bike lane options and other paths that are safe and bike friendly are available citywide. If you're mapping out a course for this year's event, or just planning a ride to locations in uptown, midtown or downtown, here's a list of recommended routes to get you to the city center.<br></p><p>Riding from the north:</p><ul style="" dir=""><li><p>Both 12th Street and 15th Avenue have bike lanes from as far north as Northern Avenue. Take either route south to connect to the Grand Canal path. Bicyclists can then ride along the canal toward 3rd Avenue (head east from 15th Avenue or head west from 12th Street) and ride south to connect to locations in uptown, midtown and downtown.<br></p></li></ul><p>Riding from the south:</p><ul style="" dir=""><li><p>Upon completion of the <a href="https://www.valleymetro.org/project/south-central-extension-downtown-hub" target="_blank">South Central Extension/Downtown Hub</a> of the light rail, Central Avenue will have bike lanes which will make for a safer route to downtown. Until that project is completed, bicyclists can make their way to 7th Street and head north toward downtown. This is the most direct path with continuous bike lanes.</p></li></ul><p>Riding from the east:</p><ul style="" class="" dir=""><li><p>(Biltmore/Arcadia Lite area) Head west on Campbell Avenue, which has bike lanes from 44th Street to 12th Street. You can connect to the Grand Canal path at 10th Street and continue west toward 3rd Avenue. You'll then turn left at 3rd Avenue and head south to connect to locations in midtown and downtown.<br></p></li><li><p>(Papago Park area) Ride toward Oak Street, which is designated as a bike route. Head west on Oak Street and cross over State Route 51. If heading to uptown or midtown, continue on Oak Street toward Central Avenue to make your way to your destination. If heading to downtown, turn left at 12th Street and head south. Just south of Interstate 10, follow the bike lane toward 11th Street along Moreland Street. Turn left at 11th Street and continue south. Turn right at Fillmore Street to take the bike boulevard into downtown.<br></p></li></ul><p>Riding from the west:</p><ul style="" dir=""><li><p>If east of Interstate 17, ride toward Encanto Boulevard and head east. Encanto Boulevard is designated as a bike route from Interstate 17 to Central Avenue, with bike lanes in some areas. Encanto Boulevard connects to 3rd Avenue, where you can ride north or south to destinations in uptown, midtown and downtown.</p></li></ul><p>More information about biking in Phoenix is available on the Street Transportation Department's Active Transportation webpage: <a href="/streets/activetransportation" target="_blank">Phoenix.gov/Streets/ActiveTransportation</a>.​</p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/streetsNewsstreet-transportationStreets
75th Pedestrian Signal Crossing Activation Eventhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/street-transportation/2283Street Transportation3/24/2022 11:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2283/75th HAWK activation 4.jpghttps://youtu.be/PLtKIMoP7l475th Pedestrian Signal Crossing Activation Event<div class="ExternalClass0846DCC0F3CC4250AE4880ECC3F60DF1"><html> <p>​Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego and District 5 Councilwoman Betty Guardado joined members of the Maryvale community and staff from the Street Transportation Department to commemorate the activation of the city's 75th pedestrian signal crossing on Thursday. The newest signal is located at Indian School Road and Amelia Avenue (between 83rd and 81st avenues along Indian School Road).<br></p> <p>READ MORE: <a href="/newsroom/street-transportation/2282" target="_blank">Phoenix Activates 75th Pedestrian Signal Crossing</a><br></p> <p>Formally referred to as a HAWK (<strong>H</strong>igh-Intensity <strong>A</strong>ctivated cross<strong>W</strong>al<strong>K</strong>), the signal features pedestrian triggered flashing red-yellow-red beacons and provides a safe crossing point for pedestrians near busy intersections and mid-block locations. A HAWK operates similar to a standard traffic signal, minus a green-signal light, and remains "dark" until engaged by a pedestrian.<br></p> <p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span>For additional information about how a HAWK pedestrian signal crossing works and where they are located citywide, visit <a href="/streets/hawk" target="_blank">Phoenix.gov/Streets/HAWK</a>.​​<span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span><br></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/streetsVideostreet-transportationStreets
Phoenix Activates 75th Pedestrian Signal Crossinghttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/street-transportation/2282Street Transportation3/24/2022 8:30:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2282/75th HAWK activation (cropped for Newsroom).jpgPhoenix Activates 75th Pedestrian Signal Crossing<div class="ExternalClass80FE052E1BAD4C8FA55D1DB33678FA87"><html> <p>​​​Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego and District 5 Councilwoman Betty Guardado joined members of the Maryvale community and staff from the Street Transportation Department to commemorate the activation of the city's 75th pedestrian signal crossing on Thursday. The newest signal is located at Indian School Road and Amelia Avenue (between 83rd and 81st avenues along Indian School Road).<br></p><p>WATCH: <a href="/newsroom/street-transportation/2283" target="_blank">75th ​Pedestrian Signal Crossing Activation Event</a><br></p> <p>"Addressing roadway safety issues in Phoenix is a top priority," Mayor Gallego said. "I'm proud of the work being done by the Street Transportation Department to add infrastructure and implement strategies to address that critical concern. Signals like the one that was activated today don't just improve pedestrian safety, they also make the road safer <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span>for bicyclists and drivers."  <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span>  <br></p> <p>Formally referred to as a HAWK (<strong>H</strong>igh-Intensity <strong>A</strong>ctivated cross<strong>W</strong>al<strong>K</strong>), the signal features pedestrian triggered flashing red-yellow-red beacons and provides a safe crossing point for pedestrians near busy intersections and mid-block locations. A HAWK operates similar to a standard traffic signal, minus a green-signal light, and remains "dark" until engaged by a pedestrian. </p> <p>"During the last several years, there has been a dramatic increase in traffic collisions and incidents involving pedestrians in Maryvale," Councilwoman Guardado said. "The addition of this signal is an important step to reverse that trend. Residents will feel safer when they walk, bike or access public transit along this stretch of Indian School Road."<br></p> <p>The HAWK that was activated today is one of 38 to be installed citywide during the last five years, and more are scheduled to be added to the inventory in the coming months. Phoenix ranks among the top three cities nationally for using this type of pedestrian signal technology, behind Tucson (141) and Austin, Texas (98). The city's first two HAWKs came online in August 2009, one at 7th Avenue and Glenrosa Avenue and the other on 19th Avenue at the Thunderbird High School crosswalk.</p> <p>In addition to the ongoing effort to expand its network of HAWKs, the Street Transportation Department is developing a comprehensive <a href="/streets/roadsafety" target="_blank">Road Safety Action Plan</a> that will incorporate the goals of Vision Zero.  </p> <p>"The Street Transportation Department, along with other city departments, is dedicated to developing and implementing the Vision Zero Road Safety Action Plan, which will ensure that a consistent strategy is used to address the recent increase in collisions and other incidents," Street Transportation Department Director Kini Knudson said. "A HAWK is one of many effective tools that will continue to be used and incorporated into the plan to improve the safety of all who use roadways citywide."<br></p> <p>Vision Zero is built around a core philosophy that traffic-related deaths and serious injuries are preventable. The <a href="https://visionzeronetwork.org/" target="_blank">Vision Zero Network</a> recognizes cities that take action towards adopting this approach to road safety as "Vision Zero Communities." In March 2021, Phoenix City Council unanimously approved funding for the Road Safety Action Plan and in January 2022 approved to incorporate the goals of Vision Zero into it. The completed plan will be presented to the community by winter 2022. </p> <p>For additional information about how a HAWK pedestrian signal crossing works and where they are located citywide, visit <a href="/streets/hawk" target="_blank">Phoenix.gov/Streets/HAWK</a>.​​<br></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/streetsNewsstreet-transportationStreets
Cool Pavement Program Honored by Arizona Forwardhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/street-transportation/2278Street Transportation3/21/2022 6:30:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2278/Cool Pavement Program - AZ Forward Crescordia Award 2022 (Newsroom crop).jpgCool Pavement Program Honored by Arizona Forward<div class="ExternalClass38CE14FFAF634AEFA015C78904745DF7"><html> <p>​The Phoenix Street Transportation Department's <a href="/streets/coolpavement" target="_blank">Cool Pavement Program</a> received a Crescordia Award in the category of Climate Action Solutions at <a href="https://arizonaforward.org/" target="_blank">Arizona Forward</a>'s 40th Annual Environmental Excellence Awards Gala held at the Arizona Biltmore Resort on Saturday, March 19. In partnership with Arizona State University (ASU), the program studies how an innovative asphalt seal coat technology could provide meaningful relief from the urban heat island effect. To date, 36 miles of neighborhood streets citywide have received the cool pavement treatment.<br></p> <p>Asphalt collects and retains heat during the day and releases it at night. The cool pavement coating reflects a higher portion of sunlight that hits it, absorbing less heat. Because of this higher reflection, the coating has the potential to offset rising nighttime temperatures in the region. </p> <p>In 2020, nine locations were selected to receive the seal coat. The city then worked with ASU researchers to conduct scientific tests of the cool paved areas, studying how it performed and how it might be used to lessen the retention of heat within the built environment. <a target="_blank" href="/newsroom/street-transportation/2064">Results of the first year of the study</a> showed that the average surface temperature in test locations is 10.5 to 12 degrees Fahrenheit lower than traditional asphalt at noon and during the afternoon hours, and that surface temperatures at sunrise averaged 2.4 degrees Fahrenheit lower.  </p> <p><a target="_blank" href="/newsroom/street-transportation/2113">The next round of the ongoing study started in October 2021</a>, and will analyze two new asphalt coatings that have higher reflective values than the material applied to the nine locations in 2020. One coating is the same light gray color and the other is a darker gray. City staff and ASU researchers also will analyze the durability of the coating during this next phase. <br></p><p>WATCH: <a target="_blank" href="/newsroom/street-transportation/2131">Cool Pavement Program Update​</a><br></p> <p>Arizona Forward is the state's leading sustainability not-for-profit organization that has successfully worked on major environmental initiatives for Arizona since 1969. The organization leverages partnerships with Arizona business leaders, local and state officials, state education leaders and policymakers to drive how the state can best grow its communities, stimulate the economy and enhance the environment.​<br></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/streetsNewsstreet-transportationStreets
Cool Pavement Program Earns Innovative Transportation Solutions Awardhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/street-transportation/2268Street Transportation3/15/2022 5:30:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2268/cool pavement.jpgCool Pavement Program Earns Innovative Transportation Solutions Award<div class="ExternalClass81B417C5B5724C43897717033CBC51D0"><html> <p>​The Phoenix Street Transportation Department's <a href="/streets/coolpavement" target="_blank">Cool Pavement Program</a> was honored by the WTS Metropolitan Phoenix Chapter as the recipient of its <a href="https://www.wtsinternational.org/news/wts-metropolitan-phoenix-announces-2022-annual-awards-recipients" target="_blank">2022 Innovative Transportation Solutions Project of the Year award</a>. The department will be officially recognized during an awards ceremony this fall.</p><p>WTS annually distinguishes individuals and organizations that have contributed to the success and advancement of women in the transportation industry, and this award identifies the contributions of four female Street Transportation Department staff members to the Cool Pavement Program's success, as well as two female Arizona State University (ASU) assistant professors who led the research used to evaluate the effectiveness of cool pavement.</p><p>Cool Pavement Program team members recognized for this award include:<br></p> <p><em>Phoenix Street Transportation Department</em></p><ul dir="" class="" style=""><li>Laurie Smith, Deputy Director<br></li><li>Seng N-Sang, Civil Engineer II</li><li>Ashley Patton, Special Projects Administrator (currently the city's Deputy Communications Director)</li><li>Heather Murphy, Communications and Public Engagement</li></ul> <p>This team provided pavement condition analysis for areas identified for possible treatment, developed the community outreach and engagement strategy, planned the announcement of the first year of scientific results and arranged a media showcase. The group also fielded numerous national and international media requests.</p> <p><em>Arizona State University</em><br></p><ul dir="" class="" style=""><li>Dr. Ariane Middel, Assistant Professor, School of Arts, Media and Engineering, Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts</li><li>Dr. Jennifer Vanos, Assistant Professor, School of Sustainability, College of Global Futures</li></ul> <p>Middel and Vanos led the research team by coordinating research efforts and data analysis, and interpreting data results. Both also participated as panelists during a joint presentation given by the city's Street Transportation Department and Office of Sustainability, and ASU to announce the results of year one of the scientific study.</p> <p><strong>About Phoenix's Cool Pavement Program</strong></p> <p>Asphalt collects and retains heat during the day and releases it at night. Phoenix is among several cities that experience the urban heat island effect, particularly overnight, due to the retention of heat within the built environment. Higher nighttime temperatures lead to more energy consumption, more greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution and other harmful effects. Cool pavement coating reflects a higher portion of the sunlight that hits it, hence absorbing less heat. Because of this higher reflection, the coating has the potential to offset rising nighttime temperatures in the region. <br></p> <p>In 2020, nine locations citywide were selected to receive the cool pavement treatment. The city then partnered with Arizona State University researchers to conduct scientific tests of the cool paved areas, studying how it performed and how it might be used to mitigate the urban heat island effect. Results of the first year of the study showed that the average surface temperature in test locations is 10.5 to 12 degrees Fahrenheit lower than traditional asphalt at noon and during the afternoon hours, and that surface temperatures at sunrise averaged 2.4 degrees Fahrenheit lower.  <br></p> <p>The next round of the ongoing study started in October 2021, and will analyze two new asphalt coatings that have higher reflective values than the material applied to the nine locations in 2020. One coating is the same light gray color and the other is a darker gray. City staff and ASU researchers also will analyze the durability of the coating during this next phase. <br></p> <p>To learn more about Phoenix's Cool Pavement Program and view a list of locations where cool pavement is being used, visit <a href="/streets/coolpavement" target="_blank">Phoenix.gov/Streets/CoolPavement</a>.​​<br></p><br></html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/streetsNewsstreet-transportationStreets

 

 

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