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Register: Killer Heat in COVID Timeshttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/environmental-programs/1460Environment & Sustainability8/18/2020 9:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1460/Newsroom_Environment_018.jpgRegister: Killer Heat in COVID Times<div class="ExternalClass9EB03C388C714E4F82FBD8B2F89FD7E0"><html> <p>​Last month, Phoenix broke its record for the most days at 110-plus degrees, while being the world's hotspot for coronavirus. This case critical discussion brings together ASU, the city of Phoenix, as well as a local nonprofit and a national NGO, to discuss the compounding crises of extreme heat and COVID-19.</p> <p> <strong>Ariane Middel, Moderator</strong> <br>Senior Sustainability Scientist, ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability and Innovation</p><p><strong>Juan Declet-Barreto</strong><br>Climate Vulnerability Social Scientist, Union of Concerned Scientists</p><p><strong>Mark Hartman</strong><br>Chief Sustainability Officer, City of Phoenix</p><p><strong>Masavi Parea</strong><br>Coalitions and Trainings Director, CHISPA Arizona</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Thursday, Sept. 3, 2020</strong> <br>2 - 3 p.m.</li> </ul> <p>Co-hosted by ASU's <a target="_blank" href="https://sustainability.asu.edu/hue/">HUE (Healthy Urban Environment) </a>initiative.</p> <p>Register via <a target="_blank" href="https://asu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ZDulPDrRQz6IiiS7cRNFAQ">Zoom</a> </p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/oepNewsenvironmental-programsEnvironment
Climate Act​ion Plan Survey - PHXTV Virtual Reportinghttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/environmental-programs/1422Environment & Sustainability7/24/2020 3:00:00 PMhttps://youtu.be/lbUQrovO9uYClimate Act​ion Plan Survey - PHXTV Virtual Reporting<div class="ExternalClassCC607FC66FAA4BDE9D6DF6F079D98FD4"><html> <p>​​The city of Phoenix is asking for your help. The Office of Environmental Programs is looking for ideas to improve air quality and reduce our carbon footprint. Environmental Programs Coordinator Rosanne Albright tell us how you can help.</p><p>Learn more about the work the city is doing and find the survey at <a href="/oep/climate" target="_blank">https://www.phoenix.gov/oep/climate</a>.</p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/oepVideoenvironmental-programsEnvironment
Phoenix Tests Use of Cool Pavement to Mitigate Heat Island Effecthttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/environmental-programs/1392Environment & Sustainability7/9/2020 7:00:00 AMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1392/Newsroom_Environment_017.jpgPhoenix Tests Use of Cool Pavement to Mitigate Heat Island Effect<div class="ExternalClassDCF23B26A9AB4865874C20A671889180"><html> <p>​Something really ‘cool’ is happening in Phoenix…literally! The City of Phoenix Street Transportation Department is launching a pilot study to evaluate cool pavement treatment.</p> <p>Asphalt collects and retains heat during the day and releases it slowly at night. Phoenix is among several cities that are experiencing the urban ‘heat island’ effect due to the retention of heat within the built environment. US Environmental Protection Agency data shows the difference in nighttime temperatures in heat island areas can be as much as 22 degrees hotter than temperatures measured outside the heat island. Higher nighttime temperatures lead to more energy consumption, more greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution and other harmful effects.</p> <p>Cool pavement is lighter in color than traditional asphalt or other seal coatings. Cool pavement reflects back the sunlight that hits it. Because the surface reflects, rather than retains heat, cool pavement has the potential to offset rising nighttime temperatures in Phoenix. It should also help cool neighborhood areas that don’t have much shade from the sun.</p> <p>Cool pavement is not a paint treatment. It is a water-based asphalt sealant that is applied on top of the existing asphalt pavement. It's made with asphalt, water, an emulsifying agent (soap), mineral fillers, polymers and recycled materials. It contains no harmful chemicals and bonds with the asphalt layer underneath.</p> <p> <img src="/streetssite/MediaAssets/Cool_Pavement_04_72DPI.jpg" alt="Side-by-side temperature readings" style="width:250px;vertical-align:auto;float:right;" />University researchers will be taking measurements and collecting data over several years to evaluate the results and determine if cool pavement helps mitigate the heat island effect and if those effects are sustainable over time.</p> <p>Because the Phoenix area climate is unlike other major cities, the study team will also assess how the material holds up against 300 days of sunshine, monsoon storms, high temperatures and daily traffic.</p> <p>Esteban Park at 32nd Street and Roeser Road was the first site to receive cool pavement treatment. Eight other locations where streets were in good condition but were due for a surface treatment were selected in consultation with the Mayor and Council offices.</p> <p>To learn more about cool pavement, please phoenix.gov/streets/coolpavement.</p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/oepNewsenvironmental-programsEnvironment
Let’s Breathe Clean Air!https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/environmental-programs/1373Environment & Sustainability7/1/2020 10:30:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1373/Newsroom_Environment_016.jpgLet’s Breathe Clean Air!<div class="ExternalClassB83D5023C78244E79C844E31EBC94DEC"><html> <p>The city of Phoenix is currently seeking the community's ideas and comments on potential actions to improve air quality and reduce its carbon footprint.</p> <p>Here is something that might surprise you: the city could, with help from the community, reduce greenhouse gas emissions community-wide by as much as 30 percent by the year 2025.</p> <p>We would like to hear your thoughts on how to get there! You can learn more about the work the city is doing and find the survey at <a href="/oep/climate" target="_blank">https://www.phoenix.gov/oep/climate</a>.</p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/oepNewsenvironmental-programsEnvironment
Phoenix Continues to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissionshttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/environmental-programs/1330Environment & Sustainability6/10/2020 4:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1330/Newsroom_Environment_015.jpgPhoenix Continues to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions<div class="ExternalClass6EC7A180506548C48A418BB87F952591"><html> <p>​<span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span>A progress report conducted by the city of Phoenix and Arizona State University shows that the city once again met its goal by achieving a 15.4 percent reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from city operations from 2005 to 2018.</p> <p>“Despite being the fastest growing city in the nation Phoenix has seen emission reductions due to our city’s proactive environmental planning measures,” said Mayor Kate Gallego. “COVID-19 has further illuminated the link between public health and the environment. Investments in clean energy technologies and emissions mitigation can assist in our recovery and make us one of the most dynamic economies in the country.”</p> <p>The most significant GHG reduction measures implemented by the city include: advanced methane capture systems at city-owned landfills; increased transition to alternative fuels; completed installation of energy-efficient streetlights and traffic signals; additional solar power projects; increased waste diversion rates, including the construction of a compost facility; and the continued construction of the PHX Sky Train.  </p> <p>The decrease in emissions is also attributed to efforts by Salt River Project and Arizona Public Service to use alternative energy sources to produce power purchased by the city.</p> <p>A community-scale GHG emissions inventory was also completed for 2018. The results show that GHG emissions on a community-scale were 0.5 percent lower than in 2012. GHG emissions decreased during a period where the city’s population grew 12 percent. </p> <p>The city’s goal is to reduce GHG emissions by 40 percent from city operations and 30 percent community wide by 2025.</p> <p>The next important step is to involve all city departments and the community in developing an updated Climate Action Plan for Council consideration this fall that will highlight the actions necessary to achieve these future goals. An online survey later this month will give Phoenix residents the opportunity to express their concerns and needs in relation to climate change.   </p> <p>For more specific details, visit <a href="/oep/2018GHG" target="_blank">https://www.phoenix.gov/oep/2018GHG</a>.<span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/oepNewsenvironmental-programsEnvironment
Phoenix Receives $1.4 Million in Brownfields Grants to Revitalize Communitieshttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/environmental-programs/1204Environment & Sustainability5/6/2020 5:00:00 PMhttps://youtu.be/EK050N3N8EwPhoenix Receives $1.4 Million in Brownfields Grants to Revitalize Communities<div class="ExternalClass501A0CA0B3B0417C8D2E2CF6211F8D30"><html> <p>At a press conference today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Southwest Region Administrator John Busterud announced that the city of Phoenix is receiving two brownfields grants totaling $1.4 million. </p> <p>"Phoenix’s Brownfields Program is poised to continue to boost our economy with these $1.4 million grants from EPA," said Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego. "The two grants allow us to address environmentally-challenged properties for the Rio Reimagined Project and provide low-interest rate loans for developers, businesses and nonprofits for cleanup of sites citywide."</p> <p>Through the <strong>Brownfields Communitywide Assessment Coalition Grant</strong> for $600,000, the city of Phoenix will lead a collaborative effort with the cities of Avondale and Tempe, and Arizona State University to assess, in each city, the area within one mile on either side of the 45-mile stretch of the Salt River (Rio Salado), Agua Fria and Gila rivers for potential brownfield properties. This project builds on previous EPA brownfields grants and work within the Rio Reimagined Urban Waters project area.</p> <p>The city is also receiving a <strong>Brownfields Cleanup Revolving Loan Fund </strong>for $800,000 to clean up brownfield properties and work with local grassroots groups, developers and government agencies to finance brownfields cleanup projects to help Phoenix become a sustainable, connected and smart desert city. Local Initiatives Support Corporation Phoenix is a partner in this grant and will be providing services as the financial manager. Their expertise in community development and management of loan and grant funds will be beneficial. This award leverages other investments to spur economic and community development.</p> <p>A brownfield is a property for which the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant. The Phoenix Brownfields Land Recycling Programs initiated in 1997, has cleaned up and put back into use, 310 acres of previously contaminated land, created or maintained over 3,300 jobs, and brought $312 million in private investment to the city.  </p> <p>To learn more about the city’s Brownfields Program, visit <a href="/oep/brownfields-about" target="_blank">https://www.phoenix.gov/oep/brownfields-about</a>.</p> <p>For more information about EPA’s Brownfields Program, visit <a href="https://www.epa.gov/brownfields" target="_blank">https://www.epa.gov/brownfields</a>.<br></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/oepVideoenvironmental-programsEnvironment
Wastewater Treatment Biogas-to-Renewable Natural Gas Facility Receives Honorable Mentionhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/environmental-programs/1195Environment & Sustainability4/30/2020 9:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1195/Newsroom_Environment_014.pngWastewater Treatment Biogas-to-Renewable Natural Gas Facility Receives Honorable Mention<div class="ExternalClass14BF3B1559DD41A28A3A41ADA949B72D"><html> <p>​The City of Phoenix Water Services Department is pleased to announce that the Renewable Natural Gas (RNG) facility at the 91st Avenue Wastewater Treatment Plant received honorable mention in <a target="_blank" href="https://www.fastcompany.com/90492165/world-changing-ideas-awards-2020-energy-finalists-and-honorable-mentions">Fast Company’s 2020 World Changing Ideas Awards</a> in the energy category. This facility is the largest wastewater treatment biogas-to-renewable natural gas facility of its kind in the United States.</p> <p>The gas is a result of the natural breakdown of organic matter in the wastewater treatment process. Prior to this operation, the majority of this gas was burned off using flares. Through this new effort, 600,000 cubic feet of gas will be treated annually and transferred to a nearby commercial gas pipeline, where it will be sold on the open market as green energy.</p> <p>The carbon-neutral RNG produced at this facility offsets approximately 44,671 metric tons of CO2 per year — the equivalent of taking roughly 70,452 passenger vehicles off the road for one year!</p> <p>Now in its fourth year, the Wo​rld Changing Ideas Awards showcase how some of the world’s most inventive entrepreneurs and companies are addressing grave global challenges. A panel of eminent judges selected winners and finalists from a pool of more than 3,000 entries across transportation, education, food, politics, technology and more.</p> <p>“There seems no better time to recognize organizations that are using their ingenuity, resources, and, in some cases, their scale to tackle society’s biggest problems,” says Stephanie Mehta, editor-in-chief of Fast Company. “Our journalists, under the leadership of senior editor Morgan Clendaniel, have uncovered some of the smartest and most inspiring projects of the year.”</p> <p> <strong>About the World Changing Ideas Awards</strong> </p> <p>World Changing Ideas is one of Fast Company’s major annual awards programs and is focused on social good, seeking to elevate finished products and brave concepts that make the world better. A panel of judges from across sectors choose winners, finalists, and honorable mentions based on feasibility and the potential for impact. With a goal of awarding ingenuity and fostering innovation, Fast Company draws attention to ideas with great potential and helps them expand their reach to inspire more people to start working on solving the problems that affect us all.​<br><br></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/oepNewsenvironmental-programsEnvironment
Heat Relief Efforts Adapt as COVID-19 Restrictions Remain in Placehttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/environmental-programs/1191Environment & Sustainability4/30/2020 4:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/1191/Newsroom_Environment_013.jpgHeat Relief Efforts Adapt as COVID-19 Restrictions Remain in Place<div class="ExternalClassC82C22C7A1684CE6B6BF901FBA1599B0"><html> <p> Record heat has arrived in Phoenix. Heat can be dangerous, and when temperatures are above 100 degrees, it is important for everyone to stay cool and stay hydrated. Coupled with the public health concerns brought on by the COVID-19 health emergency (coronavirus), staying informed about the resources available to be heat ready is essential.</p><p>Due to the coronavirus, many of the regional hyd ration stations and heat relief centers that would normally be in operation are not open, due to concerns about social distancing. Heat relief will be available at <a target="_blank" href="https://azmag.gov/portals/0/salvation-army-heat-relief-and-hydration-stations.pdf"> 12 Salvation Army centers across Maricopa County​</a> . The organization's emergency heat relief stations are available to anyone in need of assistance cooling down. Additionally, Phoenix's Human Services Department (HSD) will also continue purchasing water and distributing it to community-based providers that work with vulnerable populations like the homeless and seniors. <br><br>“With the early start to high temperatures, we want to make sure water is available to the communities that need it most. Due to the state's stay-at-home order, city buildings usually open to distribute water and provide cool spaces on hot days are still closed, so making sure the people working with those in need have the water to hand out is  crucial," Tamyra Spendley, HSD's Deputy Director said. <br><br>Last year, the city distributed over 500,000 bottles of water. It is through donations of funds that the city purchases and hands out water. Given the already urgent need for water, the city has already purchased 26 pallets of water to distribute through 35 community-based organizations. <br><br>To make a tax-deductible cash donation for water please call 602-677-6055.​<br></p> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/oepNewsenvironmental-programsEnvironment

 

 

Environment & SustainabilityPHXEnvironmenthttps://www.phoenix.gov/oepEnvironment & Sustainabilityenvironmental-programsEnvironmenthttps://www.youtube.com/user/cityofphoenixazhttps://nextdoor.com/agency-detail/az/phoenix/city-of-phoenixcityofphoenixazTwitter

 

 

Face Coverings Requiredhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/AdBox/DispForm.aspx?ID=18https://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/AdBox/Attachments/18/Mask_Slider.jpgFace Coverings Required<div class="ExternalClass3A20C750F0494BAAA7926AA5A46FAD6F"><html>​Every person in the city of Phoenix, ages two and over, shall cover their nose and mouth whenever they are away from their home or residence. Learn more about this declaration<br></html></div>Newshttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/em-and-hs/13536/19/2020 8:18:55 PM10/30/2020 8:18:55 PM

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