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Phoenix Celebrates 3rd Annual 'Thank a Water Hero Day' to honor Essential Water and Wastewater Workershttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/water-services/2479Water Services9/19/2022 12:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2479/Newsroom_ Water_Hero_Day2021lr.pngPhoenix Celebrates 3rd Annual 'Thank a Water Hero Day' to honor Essential Water and Wastewater Workers<div class="ExternalClass34954D3B89EC461BB256817513BA87D9"><html> <div>Phoenix Water will observe Thank a Water Hero Day on Friday, Sept. 23, 2022, to salute water and wastewater professionals for their dedicated service to the community. <br></div><div><br></div><div>The effects of the pandemic are still evident today, with hiring challenges for essential positions. Yet, thousands of water employees in Phoenix and throughout Arizona continue to carry out critical work that provides people with a vital resource – water. </div><div> </div><div>"Our water and wastewater professionals work 24/7 to help make Phoenix an amazing place to live. They endure extreme heat and other challenging conditions to provide clean, safe water to every resident and business," said Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego. "Of course, we think every day should be Thank a Water Hero Day! So, as we recognize our essential workers on this special day, we also want them to know we're thinking of them year-round."</div><div><br></div><div>The Phoenix Water leadership team will visit many water and wastewater treatment plants, remote facilities, and meter yards to recognize and celebrate all employees during Thank a Water Hero Day. <br></div><div><br></div><div>"Our dedicated staff overcomes daily challenges to deliver high-quality water and wastewater services that Phoenicians need and expect," said Water Services Director Troy Hayes. "I'm proud to lead a team that can focus on the day-to-day demands of a complex water system while managing future planning and infrastructure investment to serve this thriving city in the coming years."</div><div><br></div><div>If you have a story to share thanking water heroes, use these hashtags on social media: #ThankAWaterHero, #PhoenixWater, and #AZWaterHeroes.</div><div><br></div><div>Media are invited to attend the various site visits.<br></div><div><br></div><div><div>Media Contact:<br></div><div>Athena Sanchez</div><div>Public Information Officer, Phoenix Water </div><div>Mobile: 602-621-0507 (call or text)</div><div>Email: <a href="mailto:athena.sanchez@phoenix.gov%20%20" target="_blank"><strong>athena.sanchez@phoenix.gov  </strong></a><br></div><br></div><p><br></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/waterservicesNewswater-servicesWater Dept
City of Phoenix Statement on Colorado River Shortagehttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/water-services/2451Water Services8/17/2022 5:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2451/Colorado_River_Interior_Dept_NR_Crop.jpgCity of Phoenix Statement on Colorado River Shortage<div class="ExternalClass560D28C3E3E544E0BAC1E9588D741EF1"><html> <div>Today, the United States Bureau of Reclamation (“Reclamation”) declared a Tier 2a shortage for the Colorado River in 2023. While this reflects accelerating declines in Colorado River flows, Phoenix customer deliveries will not be impacted by this announcement. <br></div> <div> <br> </div> <div>In June, Reclamation stated that to save the Colorado River system additional cuts across all Basin States will be necessary. However, today’s announcement did not include a Basin State plan to reduce demand or a federal unilateral action to save the Colorado River. Given the serious circumstances on the Colorado River, this lack of action is disappointing.</div> <div> <br> </div> <div>Phoenix continues to advocate for additional collaboration throughout the Colorado River Basin and has demonstrated its commitment to sustainability and stability. In 2022 alone, Phoenix voluntarily gave up 23% of its available Colorado River entitlements to stabilize water levels in Lake Mead and help Pinal farmers who lost access to Colorado River supplies. </div> <div> <br> </div> <div>Phoenix stands by its commitment to provide water to 1.7 million customers and is taking proactive actions to ensure water deliveries and reduce dependence on the Colorado River. Phoenix will soon complete the <strong><a href="/waterservices/dpp" target="_blank">Drought Pipeline Project​</a></strong> at a cost of over $300 million, which will move alternate supplies to North Phoenix customers who rely on Colorado River water. Phoenix is continuously improving infrastructure and conducting ecosystem restoration in the Salt River system, which provides 60% of the city’s water. Water recycling and efficiency improvements are also important solutions.</div> <div> <br> </div> <div>The City declared a Stage 1 Water Alert and activated its Drought Management Plan on June 1, 2022, and is asking customers to voluntarily reduce their water use.</div> <div> <br> </div> <div>Since most of our water use is outdoors, watering landscape correctly is one of the easiest and most effective ways to conserve water. If you have grass be sure to water it no more than twice a week, even during the summer. </div> <div> <br> </div> <div>Finding and fixing leaking faucets and toilets is the simplest way to reduce indoor water use. Visually check each faucet and toilet for leaks at least once a month. </div> <div> <br> </div> <div>Choose water efficient landscaping, fixtures, and appliances when building or updating a home.​<br></div> <div> <br> </div> <div>Learn more: <a style="background-color:window;font-size:10pt;" href="https://phoenix.gov/drought" target="_blank"><div style="display:inline !important;"><strong>phoenix.gov/drought</strong></div></a></div> <div> <br> </div> <div>Media Contact:<br></div> <div>Michael Gertzman</div> <div>Senior Public Information Officer </div> <div>Phoenix Water Services <br></div> <div>Desk: 602-534-1209 </div> <div>Email: <a target="_blank" href="mailto:michael.gertzman@phoenix.gov"><strong>michael.gertzman@phoenix.gov</strong></a><br></div> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/waterservicesNewswater-servicesWater Dept
Mayor Kate Gallego Joins Other City Officials to Judge Stormwater Bookmark Art Contesthttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/water-services/2411Water Services7/8/2022 4:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2411/newsroom_water_051.jpgMayor Kate Gallego Joins Other City Officials to Judge Stormwater Bookmark Art Contest<div class="ExternalClass5354DE490F454BCFAC0DA3B543A85C4B"><html> <p>​Dozens of children participated in the Phoenix Water Department's "Only Rain in the Storm Drain" bookmark art contest. Of the 93 entries by children ages, 6 to 12, Environmental Services staff selected 16 finalists for official judging. <br></p> <p>The judges, Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego, City Librarian Rita Hamilton, Water Assistant Director Nazario Prieto, and Water Deputy Director Jennifer Calles, gathered at Burton Barr Central Library on May 18. They evaluated each entry for artistic quality, message, creativity, and clarity. </p> <p>When the scores were tallied, Levi Wyatt, age 9, placed first, Chinmayi Adiga, age 12, placed second, and Winston Reed, age 7, placed third. Their artwork was turned into official bookmarks currently available for free at all <a target="_blank" href="https://www.phoenixpubliclibrary.org/locations">Phoenix library locations</a>, and they received a collection of Phoenix Water educational materials and souvenirs.</p> <p>The bookmarks serve as a critical reminder that only rain should go in the storm drain. It's an important message during monsoon season because it's common for people to misuse storm drains by dumping trash and other contaminants in them that can end up in streams and rivers.</p> <p>Phoenix Water urges residents to keep pollutants like litter, grease, oil, pet waste, and fertilizers away from storm drains. Remember, Only Rain in the Storm Drain! To learn more about what you can do in your home or business, visit Phoenix Water's website for the <a target="_blank" href="/waterservices/envservices/stormwater-program">Stormwater Management Program</a>.</p> <p>Aspiring young artists will be invited to participate in next year's stormwater bookmark contest. Details will be announced on <a target="_blank" href="https://www.facebook.com/CityofPhoenixAZ/">Facebook</a>, <a target="_blank" href="https://www.instagram.com/cityofphoenixaz/">Instagram</a>, and <a target="_blank" href="https://twitter.com/cityofphoenixaz">Twitter</a>.</p> ​ <br></html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/waterservicesNewswater-servicesWater Dept
City of Phoenix Declares Stage 1 Water Alert and Activates Drought Management Planhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/water-services/2363Water Services6/1/2022 10:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2363/Newsroom_Water_047.pngCity of Phoenix Declares Stage 1 Water Alert and Activates Drought Management Plan<div class="ExternalClass972724BC9D7C47089E00861A8D0C25C9"><html> <p> <strong>​Water Conservation Media Day | Monday, June 6 @ 9 a.m.| 4106 W. La Mirada Drive, Phoenix, AZ</strong> </p> <p>Due to the shortage of water on the Colorado River caused by overallocation, prolonged drought, and climate change, the City of Phoenix has declared a <strong>Stage 1 Water Alert</strong> and activated its <a target="_blank" href="/waterservicessite/Documents/2021_Drought_Management_Plan_FINAL.pdf#search=drought%20management%20plan">Drought Management Plan</a>. City of Phoenix Water Services Department Director Troy Hayes made the announcement during a <a target="_blank" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oNWXei3eFik&t=2757s">City Council subcommittee presentation​</a> on Wednesday, June 1. <br></p> <p>The City is taking this action to address the mandatory reduction of Colorado River water and deeper cuts that are likely to occur in the future. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation has been working with the seven Colorado River Basin states to manage the changing conditions. However, the levels of Lake Powell and Lake Mead continue to fall precipitously, and the projections show conditions will worsen significantly. </p> <p>A <a target="_blank" href="/waterservices/drought"><strong>Stage 1 Water Alert</strong></a> occurs when an insufficient supply of water appears likely due to water system or supply limitations. As a result of the declaration, the City will begin an intensive public education and information program to assist all customers in understanding the state of the emergency and the need for voluntary conservation.</p> <p>During the early stages of stressed water supplies, the City will ask customers to voluntarily reduce their water use in ways that will have minimal impact on their lifestyles. Since most of our water use is outdoors, <a target="_blank" href="https://www.amwua.org/landscape-and-garden/landscape-watering-for-the-arizona-desert">watering landscape correctly</a> is one of the easiest and most effective ways to conserve water. Finding and fixing leaking faucets and toilets is the simplest way to reduce indoor water use. Voluntary reductions do not require enforcement, and the primary cost to the City will be associated with customer outreach and education. Any costs incurred by customers due to voluntary reductions will be at the customer's discretion and may be offset by lower water bills.</p> <p>"The situation on the Colorado River is unprecedented, and we are taking it very seriously," said Mayor Kate Gallego. "Each of us is responsible for making simple changes to live more sustainably in the desert environment we call home. The City of Phoenix is committed to reducing water use in city operations and providing the tools residents and businesses need to use this precious resource efficiently."</p> <p>At a <a target="_blank" href="https://cap-az.granicus.com/player/clip/631?&redirect=true">briefing</a> on Friday, May 6, officials with the U.S. Department of the Interior, Arizona Department of Water Resources, and Central Arizona Project delivered a stark assessment of the Colorado River. Colorado River water supplies roughly 40% of the City's water.</p> <p>"As the drought intensifies, the City continues to innovate new, proactive actions to prepare for even deeper shortages on the Colorado River, which is over-allocated and in decline due to climate change," said Phoenix Water Services Director Troy Hayes. "The City is prepared to implement additional actions, including those described in our Drought Management Plan."</p> <p>The City has worked hard to develop a sustainable water supply and has been designated by the State as having a 100-year assured water supply. In addition, Phoenix recycles nearly all its wastewater, delivering it for use in agriculture, energy production, urban irrigation, aquifer recharge, and riparian wetland maintenance.</p> <p>"Our customers have always been our partners in conservation, and we need that more than ever now," said City of Phoenix Water Resources Management Advisor Cynthia Campbell. "We want them to understand what it means to live in a desert and how to use water as efficiently as possible."</p> <p>Phoenix will continue to plan, invest and conserve to ensure a sustainable future while providing safe, clean, and reliable water to its customers without interruption. Additionally, the City will continue to take proactive actions to prepare for even deeper shortages on the Colorado River as we strive to become the most sustainable desert city in the world.</p> <p> <a target="_blank" href="/newsroom/water-services/2342">Colorado River Water Shortage Caused by Climate Change will require Phoenix and Phoenicians to adapt</a> </p> <p> <strong>Phoenix to Host Water Conservation Media Day</strong> </p> <p>Now that the City of Phoenix has activated its Drought Management Plan and declared a <strong>Stage 1 Water Alert, </strong>everyone in Phoenix should take action to conserve water. Conservation experts from the City of Phoenix will be available to discuss simple things people can do in their own homes to reduce water use. They will also demonstrate some of the latest technology for water conservation.<strong> </strong></p> <p> <strong>WHO: City of Phoenix water conservation experts</strong> </p> <p> <strong>WHAT: Interviews and demonstrations about water conservation</strong> </p> <p> <strong>WHEN: Monday, June 6 @ 9 a.m.</strong> </p> <p> <strong>WHERE: 4106 W. La Mirada Drive, Phoenix, AZ</strong> </p> <p> <strong>Please RSVP to Michael Gertzman at michael.gertzman@phoenix.gov</strong> </p><p><br></p><p>Media Contact:<br></p><p>Michael Gertzman</p><p>Water Services<br>Cell: 602-245-4143 (call or text) <br>E-mail: <a href="mailto:michael.gertzman@phoenix.gov" target="_blank">michael.gertzman@phoenix.gov</a></p><p>Athena Sanchez<br>Water Services<br>Cell: 602-621-0507 (call or text) <br>E-mail: <a href="mailto:athena.sanchez@phoenix.gov?subject=News%20Release" target="_blank">athena.sanchez@phoenix.gov</a>​<br></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/waterservicesNewswater-servicesWater Dept
Volunteers Needed for Water Wrangler Conservation Program https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/water-services/2361Water Services5/31/2022 6:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2361/Newsroom_Water_039.jpgVolunteers Needed for Water Wrangler Conservation Program <div class="ExternalClass7050606AB9B3450DBA51BF49CD3C28DE"><html> <div>​Phoenix Water is asking community members to donate their time to help others learn about the importance of water conservation.  <br></div> <div> <br> </div> <div>The current Colorado River water shortage is a stark reminder of how important it is for everyone to reduce their water use. The innovative Water Wrangler program will teach people about water and empower them to share their knowledge with others. It is an excellent opportunity for community-minded people looking to be a positive influence. </div> <div> <br> </div> <div>The Water Wrangler program includes a 12-hour training program that spans four sessions and covers Water 101, Utility Operations, Water Resources and Conservation, and Outreach Education. After completing Phoenix Water Wrangler Institute, participants receive a Certificate of Participation and a shirt. In addition, they will get opportunities to serve as community representatives at local events, public meetings, and City of Phoenix programs. </div> <div> <br> </div> <div>Mayor Kate Gallego shares, "Because the current drought is so severe, we all must think differently and act differently. Now, more than ever, we need good stewards who can share information about how to wisely use this precious resource. By becoming a Water Wrangler, you'll serve your community by teaching neighbors how to be part of the solution." </div> <div> <br> </div> <div>Periods of drought are common in the desert southwest, sometimes enduring for decades. To be part of the solution, community members must adapt to the desert lifestyle and do their part to be water smart. Through information sharing and community engagement, the Phoenix Water Wrangler Institute will activate water conservation for the benefit of everyone in our community.  </div> <div> <br> </div> <div>To apply, submit an <a target="_blank" href="/waterservices/waterwrangler">online application</a> by June 16 for the virtual training.   </div> <div> <br> </div> <div>These are the requirements to participate:  ​<br></div> <div> <ul> <li> <span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">Must be at least 18-years old    </span> </li> <li>Have a high school diploma or equivalent    <br></li> <li>Have excellent communication skills    <br></li> <li>Able to successfully complete the pre-service training    </li> <li> <span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">Comfortable and enjoy public speaking, community development, and working with diverse groups of people   </span> </li> <li>Creative, responsible, organized, flexible, and self-motivated    </li> </ul> </div> <div>When: Starting June 30 on Thursdays: July 14, 21 and 28 (6- 8 p.m.)   <br></div> <div> <br> </div> <div>Apply: <a target="_blank" href="/waterservices/waterwrangler">phoenix.gov/waterwrangler ​</a>  </div> <div> <br> </div> <div> <br> </div> <div>Media Contact:   <br></div> <div>Angela Serda  <br></div> <div>Public Information Specialist   <br></div> <div>Cell: (623) 499-8919 (call or text)  <br></div> <div>Email: angela.serda@phoenix.gov  <br></div> <div> <br> </div> <div>Volunteer Program Contact:   </div> <div>Max Wilson <br></div> <div>Water Conservation Coordinator <br></div> <div>Cell: (602) 256-4354 <br></div> <div>​Email:  maxwell.wilson@phoenix.gov<br></div> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/waterservicesNewswater-servicesWater Dept
Colorado River Water Shortage Caused by Climate Change will require Phoenix and Phoenicians to adapthttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/water-services/2342Water Services5/6/2022 10:28:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2342/Newsroom_Water_LMead.jpgColorado River Water Shortage Caused by Climate Change will require Phoenix and Phoenicians to adapt<div class="ExternalClass4D2D66EAA18341528AAF492F1DC77006"><html> <div>At their <a href="https://cap-az.granicus.com/player/clip/631?&redirect=true" target="_blank">briefing​</a> on Friday, May 6, officials with the U.S. Department of the Interior, Arizona Department of Water Resources, and Central Arizona Project delivered a stark assessment of the Colorado River.<br></div> <div> <br> </div> <div>As impacts of climate change persist, more significant Colorado River cuts are likely to occur. Those reductions will impact the amount of Colorado River water available to Phoenix and other central Arizona municipalities, farmers, and tribes. Central Arizona is currently experiencing the first-ever declared shortage on the Colorado River.</div> <div> <br> </div> <div>"Three things are true about this situation: first, it is serious. Second, it will require the city to think differently, and plan differently, for how we use water. Third, we need to enlist the people of Phoenix as our partners in the hard work ahead,” said Mayor Kate Gallego. “Researchers are serious when they tell us this megadrought is the worst in at least 1,200 years. The more we can encourage people, and businesses, to think creatively about how to reduce water consumption now, the better off we will be.”</div> <div> <br> </div> <div>Over the course of decades, Phoenix developed a robust and diverse water resource portfolio with multiple sources and contingency supplies to provide safe, clean, and reliable water to our customers. The Colorado River currently supplies 40% of the water Phoenix uses.</div> <div> <br> </div> <div>"The Colorado River shortage is coming sooner than anticipated," said Phoenix Water Services Troy Hayes. "But all the planning and investment in infrastructure that we have done has put the City in a good place to manage the challenging conditions."</div> <div> <br> </div> <div>The City has invested in infrastructure and underground water storage and has been a strong pioneer in water conservation in anticipation of a Colorado River shortage. Yet, as the drought intensifies, the City must continue to innovate new, proactive actions to prepare for even deeper shortages on the Colorado River, which is over-allocated and in decline due to climate change. The City is prepared to implement additional actions, including those described in its <a href="/waterservicessite/Documents/2021_Drought_Management_Plan_FINAL.pdf" target="_blank"><strong>Drought Management Plan.</strong></a></div> <div> <br> </div> <div>"Our customers have always been our partners in conservation, and we need that more than ever now," said City of Phoenix Water Resources Management Advisor Cynthia Campbell. "It is imperative that everyone understands that as we adapt to a hotter, drier future, efficient water use will be essential for maintaining the quality of life we have become accustomed to in the desert."<br></div> <div> <br> </div> <div>Residential consumption makes up approximately 70% of water use in Phoenix. With just a little effort, every Phoenix Water customer can easily reduce their water use by 1% to 5%, saving millions of gallons of water every year.<br></div> <div> <div>Here are some ways to conserve water at homes and businesses:<br><br></div><div><strong>Simple, low-cost conservation solutions</strong><br></div><div><ul><li>Do not overwater landscaping and use a smart irrigation controller to reduce outdoor water use. Text WHENTOWATER to 33222 for simple monthly reminders to keep your watering on track.<strong> </strong><a href="https://wateruseitwisely.com/saving-water-outdoors/interactive-watering-guides/" target="_blank"><strong>Learn more. </strong></a></li><li>Find and fix leaks inside and outside.<strong> </strong><a href="https://www.smarthomewaterguide.org/" target="_blank"><strong>Learn more.</strong></a></li><li>Know the optimal amount of water to use in your home with the <a href="/waterservices/usage-calculator" target="_blank"><strong>Water Usage Calculator. </strong></a><br></li></ul></div><div><strong>Substantial conservation solutions</strong><br></div><div><ul><li>Choose xeriscape by removing or reducing grass lawns, and planting native or desert adapted trees, shrubs, and groundcover that require little water once established. <a href="https://www.amwua.org/landscaping-with-style" target="_blank"><strong>Learn more.</strong></a></li><li>Upgrade to water-saving toilets and a low water use dishwasher and washing machine.</li><li>Cover swimming pools to reduce evaporation.</li></ul></div><div>While asking residents and businesses to do their part, the City is increasing its conservation outreach effort. For example, the Phoenix Water Conservation team expanded its homeowner's associations outdoor water efficiency program to reach more neighborhoods. After meeting with just six associations, the Water Conservation team identified a potential for more than 20 million gallons per year of savings – enough water to supply 184 families for a year. As more HOA's participate, Phoenix expects even more water savings.</div><div><br></div><div>The City has worked hard to develop a sustainable water supply and has been designated by the State as having a 100-year assured water supply. In addition, Phoenix recycles nearly all its wastewater, delivering it for use in agriculture, energy production, urban irrigation, aquifer recharge, and riparian wetland maintenance.</div><div><br></div><div>Phoenix will continue to plan, invest and conserve to ensure a sustainable future while providing safe, clean, and reliable water to its customers without interruption. Additionally, the City will continue to take proactive actions to prepare for even deeper shortages on the Colorado River as we strive to become the most sustainable desert city in the world.</div><div><br></div><div><strong><a href="/waterservices/drought" target="_blank">City of Phoenix Drought Action Plan</a></strong><br></div><div><a href="/waterservices/dpp" target="_blank"><strong>Drought Pipeline Project</strong></a></div><div><a href="/newsroom/water-services/2194" target="_blank"><strong>Phoenix City Council Approves Water Conservation Plan</strong></a></div><div><a href="/waterservices/resourcesconservation" target="_blank"><strong>Water Resources and Conservation</strong></a><br></div><div><a href="https://wateruseitwisely.com/" target="_blank"><strong>Water – Use It Wisely</strong></a><br></div><div><a href="https://wateruseitwisely.com/saving-water-outdoors/interactive-watering-guides/" target="_blank"><strong>Landscape Watering Guide</strong></a><br></div><div><a href="https://www.smarthomewaterguide.org/" target="_blank"><strong>Smart Home Water Guide</strong></a></div><div><a href="https://www.amwua.org/landscaping-with-style" target="_blank"><strong>Xeriscaping: Landscaping with Style in the Arizona desert</strong></a><br></div><div><a href="https://www.arizonawaterfacts.com/" target="_blank"><strong>Arizona Department of Water Resources Arizona Water Facts</strong></a><br></div><br></div> <p style="text-align:center;"> <strong>-30-</strong> <br> </p> <p style="text-align:left;"> <strong>Media Contact:<br>Michael Gertzman<br>Senior Public Information Officer<br>Phoenix Water Services <br>Cell: 602-245-4143 (call or text) <br>Email: <a href="mailto:michael.gertzman@phoenix.gov%2520" target="_blank">michael.gertzman@phoenix.gov ​</a><br><br></strong> </p> <p style="text-align:left;"> <strong> <br></strong> </p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/waterservicesNewswater-servicesWater Dept
Glendale Avenue Traffic Restrictions Due to Drought Pipeline Construction https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/water-services/2234Water Services2/9/2022 6:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2234/Drought_Pipeline_NR_2022_02.jpgGlendale Avenue Traffic Restrictions Due to Drought Pipeline Construction <div class="ExternalClassBCB5DD77E2304FB6BCF164BD77A25CFF"><html> <div>On Feb. 14, installation of the Drought Pipeline under Glendale Avenue at 21st Street will begin. Heavy traffic restrictions will be in place with one through traffic lane maintained on Glendale Avenue. Left turns will not be permitted at 20th Street and Glendale Avenue. The work is expected to take six to eight weeks. Drivers are encouraged to use an alternate route and avoid Lincoln Drive, west of 24th Street and Glendale Avenue east of State Route 51.<br></div> <div> <br> </div> <div>Along State Route 51, drivers can see the 66-inch diameter steel pipes lined up, waiting for construction crews to bury them underground. In some areas, the pipes will be nearly 40 feet deep.</div> <div> <br> </div> <div>The Perl Charles Memorial Trail (#1A) will remain closed as the 66-inch pipeline construction continues. Drivers attempting to access several other hiking trails in the area will be rerouted. </div> <div> <br> </div> <div>Construction for the project continues on Bell Road from 31st to 32nd Street with minimal traffic restrictions in place. Additional pipeline work is ongoing along 32nd Street. As a result, the traffic flow in the area of 32nd Street between Claire Drive (just south of Greenway Road) and Thunderbird Road is heavily restricted. </div> <div> <br> </div> <div>As always, drivers are encouraged to be cautious near construction zones.</div> <div> </div> <div>The Colorado River is the primary water source for over 400,000 customers in North Phoenix. The Drought Pipeline, which is expected to be completed in early 2023, will ensure all customers have access to safe, reliable, clean drinking water during future times of shortage on the Colorado River. The new pipeline will have the capability of moving 75 million gallons of Salt and Verde river water a day from the city's southern area to the north. For more information, please visit <a href="/waterservices/dpp" target="_blank"><strong>phoenix.gov/droughtpipeline</strong></a>. For the most up-to-date traffic restrictions, please download the project app available for free on <a href="https://apps.apple.com/us/app/drought-pipeline-project/id1538466477" target="_blank"><strong>iOS</strong></a><strong> </strong>or <a href="https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.kiewit.phxwatersmart" target="_blank"><strong>Google Play</strong></a><strong>.</strong></div> <div> <br> </div> <div style="text-align:center;"> <strong>-30-</strong> </div> <div> <br> </div> <div> <strong>Media Contacts: </strong> </div> <div> <br> </div> <div>Athena Sanchez</div> <div>Public Information Officer <br></div> <div>Phoenix Water Services <br></div> <div>Cell: 602-621-0507 (call or text)<br></div> <div>Email: <a href="mailto:athena.sanchez@phoenix.gov" target="_blank"><strong>athena.sanchez@phoenix.gov</strong></a><br></div> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/waterservicesNewswater-servicesWater Dept
Phoenix to Host Annual Stormwater Awareness Week Jan. 24 - 30https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/water-services/2204Water Services1/19/2022 7:41:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2204/Newsroom Storwater2 Sized.pngPhoenix to Host Annual Stormwater Awareness Week Jan. 24 - 30<div class="ExternalClass6BE161732C79427B9BB6F27CD213B7E9"><html> <div>Phoenix Water Services is hosting its annual Stormwater Awareness Week from Jan. 24 – 30, 2022. A free virtual workshop is scheduled at noon on Wednesday, Jan. 26, to communicate the importance of stormwater pollution prevention. Several Arizona cities and organizations will join Phoenix for this regional effort to educate the public about the importance of preserving stormwater quality for the environment and future generations.<br></div> <div> <br> </div> <div>“Because it rains so infrequently in Phoenix, contaminants build up over time,” said Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego. “When we get significant rainfall, pollutants are washed into our local rivers, washes, retention basins, and even neighborhood parks. Every resident can help to raise awareness and protect our water resources.”</div> <div> <br> </div> <div>Stormwater picks up pollutants as it flows over rooftops, gutters, parking lots, driveways, and other paved surfaces. Polluted stormwater can work its way into storm drains and eventually surface water and retention areas.</div> <div> <br> </div> <div>Simple actions to reduce stormwater pollution include:</div> <div> <br> </div> <div>•<span style="white-space:pre;"> </span>Properly disposing of trash, recyclables, and yard waste</div> <div>•<span style="white-space:pre;"> </span>Recycling motor oil and maintaining your vehicle to prevent leaks</div> <div>•<span style="white-space:pre;"> </span>Cleaning up after your pet</div> <div>•<span style="white-space:pre;"> </span>Using lawn chemicals sparingly and always following manufacturer's directions</div> <div>•<span style="white-space:pre;"> </span>Properly disposing of leftover paint and household chemicals at a household hazardous waste event</div> <div>•<span style="white-space:pre;"> </span>Remember - only rain in the storm drain</div> <div> <br> </div> <div>"When stormwater runs over impervious surfaces, it can pick up pollutants like oil from leaking cars or pet waste," said Water Services Director Troy Hayes. "Stormwater does not go to a treatment plant but rather flows untreated to the environment. It is a lot easier and more cost-effective to prevent pollutants from contacting stormwater than it is to clean up stormwater after it becomes polluted." <br></div> <div> <br> </div> <div>To participate in the free one-hour virtual workshop on Jan. 26 to discuss the city's Stormwater Management Program and actions to reduce stormwater pollution, <a href="https://phoenix.gov/stormwater" target="_blank"><strong>p</strong><strong>lease register here</strong></a><strong>. </strong></div><div><strong><br></strong></div><div>To learn more about the City of Phoenix Water Services Stormwater Awareness Week and what you can do as an individual or business to prevent stormwater pollution, visit <a href="https://phoenix.gov/stormwater" target="_blank">https://phoenix.gov/stormwater.​</a><br></div><div><strong><br></strong></div><div style="text-align:center;">-30-<br></div> <div> <br> </div> <div>Media Contact: <br></div> <div>Athena Sanchez <br></div> <div>602-621-0507<br></div> <div> <a href="mailto:Athena.sanchez@phoenix.gov%2520" target="_blank"> <strong>Athena.sanchez@phoenix.gov </strong> </a> <br> </div> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/waterservicesNewswater-servicesWater Dept

 

 

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