​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

 

 

Phoenix is Fastest-Growing U.S. City; Here's Where They Come Fromhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/ced/851Community and Economic Development1/23/2020 7:00:00 AMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/851/NEWSROOM_CED_0023.jpgPhoenix is Fastest-Growing U.S. City; Here's Where They Come From<div class="ExternalClass063B9942E2844186885073BF3F1D48B7"><html> <p>​More than one-quarter of a million new faces are calling Phoenix “home” since the 2010 Decennial Census. The city’s population of 1.7 million makes it the fastest-growing American city. Yet, finding a Phoenix native is still a challenge. More than three of four new residents move to Phoenix from elsewhere. <span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">In that same period, n</span><span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">early one million new</span><span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;"> faces now </span><span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">call "Arizona" home, according to the Census bureau. Where were the prior homes before Phoenix?</span></p> <p style="text-align:center;"> <em>By Eric Jay Toll for PHXNewsroom</em> <br> </p> <p>Data generated from website analytics say that Phoenix is one city where far-fewer plan to leave when compared to ​other major U.S. markets. With 22 percent of its renters looking to go elsewhere, only San Diego, with 21 percent of its renters, has a lower percentage of renters looking to leave.  Most of those who want to leave California plan to come to Phoenix, according to the <a href="https://www.apartmentlist.com/rentonomics/2020-q1-renter-migration-report/" target="_blank">ApartmetList</a> study.<br></p> <div> <p>Phoenix comes in second lowest on the places apartment dwellers want to leave. That’s according to aggregated data from ApartmentList. The analysis reports that a third of all new renters moving to Phoenix come from Los Angeles.<br></p><h3>Census says almost 70,000 Californians left state last year​​<br></h3> <p>While the value of this type of data is limited to the source’s clients and the data points selected for the aggregation, it echoes 2018 data from the <a href="https://www.census.gov/topics/population/migration/guidance/metro-to-metro-migration-flows.html" target="_blank">U.S. Census Bureau</a> for metros and the 2019 state-to-state population movement. <a href="https://www.census.gov/newsroom/press-kits/2019/national-state-estimates.html" target="_blank">Census data</a> say nearly 70,000 Californians moved to Arizona last year. <br></p> <p>ApartmentList data say that more than eight times as many Angelenos, 33.2 percent, moved into Phoenix in 2019 as moved in from Riverside, California, 4.6 percent, the second city on the list of inbound renters’ place of origin. Third position Chicago generated 4 percent of Phoenix’s move-ins. The data also say that while 22 percent of current Phoenix apartment dwellers plan to relocate into other metros, among U.S. metros, only San Diego has a lower percentage.<br></p> <p>The renter data are compiled by analyzing a website user’s current place of residence with their ApartmentList searches into other cities. The data are limited to renters. Census data are estimates generated from a sampling of people who have actually moved from one metro to another. These data include renters and home buyers.<br></p><h3>Phoenicians moving out go to L.A., Tucson and Prescott​​<br></h3> <p>Los Angeles, Tucson and Prescott are the cities outbound Phoenix residents searched most often, according to ApartmentList. However, of Valley residents searching for a new place to rent, 77.6 percent looked somewhere within the Phoenix metro area. Only 22.4 percent looked to leave.<br></p> <p>In comparison, a little more than two-thirds of Denver and Austin residents looked to stay in their metro areas; in Chicago, more than 40 percent planned to leave the city. Nearly two-thirds look to leave the Bay Area and Silicon Valley. <br></p> <p>Those later data coincide with a study reported in the <a href="https://sf.curbed.com/2019/2/20/18233498/poll-2019-leaving-san-francisco-oakland-silicon-valley" target="_blank">Curbed San Francisco</a> reported that more than half of Bay Area residents want to leave the area.  <a href="https://www.reuters.com/article/us-california-population/half-of-california-voters-have-considered-leaving-over-housing-costs-politics-poll-idUSKBN1WC2DG" target="_blank">Reuters ​</a>reported that more than half of California voters would consider leaving over housing costs.<br></p><h3>A third of those looking to leave cities are looking to Phoenix<br></h3> <p>There are other interesting patterns in the ApartmentList data. Across the U.S., 34 percent of those looking to rent elsewhere are looking in Phoenix, tying with Los Angeles for 12th in the U.S. Denver topped the list with 48 percent of those looking elsewhere including Denver in their search. For Denver, however, 31 percent of its interested renters are looking to other metros, compared to 21 percent for San Diego and 22 percent for Phoenix, the first and second metros for fewest looking to leave.<br></p> <p>Orlando is on the bottom of that list, with 50 percent of its looking renters searching for a metro somewhere else for a new home. Orlando is followed by Riverside, California; Detroit, Chicago, and Charlotte, North Carolina.<br></p> <p>Census data also track immigrants to metros from other nations. Over the last five years, over 10,000 Asians, including Indians, moved into the Valley. That pace actually makes Asian nations the second-largest source of new residents for Phoenix. Central American immigrants, 7,300, would position as the fourth-largest source. Almost 6,000 came from Mexico and Canada, which would fall into the fifth-largest position.<br></p> </div> <h4>Top 10 Sources of New Phoenix Area Residents (2013-2018)<br></h4> <div> <table class="ms-rteTable-default" width="100%" cellspacing="0"> <tbody> <tr class="ms-rteTableEvenRow-default"> <td style="width:259px;" class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA</p> </td> <td style="width:258px;" class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>11,868<br></p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableOddRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Tucson, AZ</p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>11,335<br></p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableEvenRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI</p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>6,867</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableOddRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>San Diego-Carlsbad, CA</p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>4,967</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableEvenRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA</p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>4,930</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableOddRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA</p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>4,847</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableEvenRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA</p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>4,211</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableOddRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, OR-WA</p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>4,111</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableEvenRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Flagstaff, AZ</p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>3,902</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableOddRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, CO</p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>3,823</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableEvenRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p> <em>Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Dec. 27, 2019.</em> </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>​<br></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> <br> </p> </div> <div> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span> <h4>Top 10 Metros to Which Valley Residents Moved (2013-2018)</h4> <table class="ms-rteTable-default" width="100%" cellspacing="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="width:50%;" class="ms-rteTable-default"> <p>Tucson, AZ </p> </td> <td style="width:50%;" class="ms-rteTable-default"> <p>10,343</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td class="ms-rteTable-default"> <p>Flagstaff, AZ </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTable-default"> <p>5,833</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td class="ms-rteTable-default"> <p>Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTable-default"> <p>5,226</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td class="ms-rteTable-default"> <p>Prescott, AZ </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTable-default"> <p>4,954</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td class="ms-rteTable-default"> <p>Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTable-default"> <p>4,405</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td class="ms-rteTable-default"> <p>Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, OR-WA </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTable-default"> <p>3,110</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td class="ms-rteTable-default"> <p>New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTable-default"> <p>2,492</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td class="ms-rteTable-default"> <p>Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTable-default"> <p>2,933</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td class="ms-rteTable-default"> <p>Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, CO </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTable-default"> <p>2,754</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td class="ms-rteTable-default"> <p>Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTable-default"> <p>2,738</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td class="ms-rteTable-default"> <p> <em>Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Dec. 27, 2019.</em> </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTable-default"> <p>​​<br></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> <br> </p> </div> <h4>Top 10 Metros to Phoenix Based on Net Migration (2013-2018)</h4> <table class="ms-rteTable-default" width="100%" cellspacing="0"> <tbody> <tr class="ms-rteTableEvenRow-default"> <td colspan="2" style="width:50%;" class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Net migration is residents moving into Phoenix metro minus Phoenix residents moving out of the metro ​</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableOddRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>6.642</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableEvenRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>4,129</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableOddRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>San Diego-Carlsbad, CA </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>2,331</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableEvenRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>1,905</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableOddRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>1,892</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableEvenRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Detroit-Warren-Dearborn, MI </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>1,495</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableOddRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Albuquerque, NM </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>1,346</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableEvenRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Salt Lake City, UT </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>1,299</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableOddRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>1,278</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableEvenRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>1,266</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableOddRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p> <em>Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Dec. 27, 2019.</em> </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>​<br></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> <br> </p> <h4>Top 10 Metros from Phoenix Based on Net Migration</h4> <table class="ms-rteTable-default" width="100%" cellspacing="0"> <tbody> <tr class="ms-rteTableEvenRow-default"> <td colspan="2" style="width:50%;" class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Net migration is residents moving to Phoenix metro minus Phoenix residents moving out of the metro. A negative number means more people moving from Phoenix to the other metro. ​</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableOddRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Prescott, AZ Metro Area</p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>(2,188)</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableEvenRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Flagstaff, AZ Metro Area</p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>(1,931)</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableOddRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Sierra Vista-Douglas, AZ Metro Area</p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>(1,110)</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableEvenRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Provo-Orem, UT Metro Area</p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>(1,011)</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableOddRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>San Antonio-New Braunfels, TX Metro Area</p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>(657)</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableEvenRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Austin-Round Rock, TX Metro Area</p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>(438)</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableOddRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX Metro Area</p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>(410)</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableEvenRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC Metro Area</p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>(390)</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableOddRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Warner Robins, GA Metro Area</p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>(384)</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableEvenRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p>Albany-Schenectady-Troy, NY Metro Area</p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>(364)</p> </td> </tr> <tr class="ms-rteTableOddRow-default"> <td class="ms-rteTableEvenCol-default"> <p> <em>Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Dec. 27, 2019.</em> </p> </td> <td class="ms-rteTableOddCol-default"> <p>​​<br><br></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevNewscedGraphic, map showing cities from where new Phoenix residents originateCED#PhxEconDev #PopulationGrowth #BestCitiesphoenix, economic development, population, population growth, migrationEric Jay Toll602-617-3797eric.toll@phoenix.govhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/MediaContact/Attachments/52/Eric_Toll.jpgPHXEconDev

 

 

Phoenix’s Central Station One Step Closer to Completionhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/public-transit/3111Public Transit5/24/2024 5:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/3111/Central Station East Tower Newsroom.pngPhoenix’s Central Station One Step Closer to Completion<div class="ExternalClass8E328A4B8DC04CBF995AF00B775D0E7E"><html> <p> Central Station redevelopment, the mixed-use, transit-oriented development project hosted a topping-out ceremony for the east tower May 23, 2024. This event marks a significant milestone in the construction progress of Central Station.</p><div> </div> <div> Located in the heart of downtown, next to the historic Security Building, Civic Space Park, and ASU's Downtown Campus, Central Station is set to become a new city landmark consisting of two residential towers that will offer student and workforce housing, two levels of below-grade parking, City of Phoenix public transit hub, and retail/office spaces.  </div> <div> <br> </div> <div> Slated to open in early 2025, Central Station will transform how users experience the city's primary downtown bus and light rail transit center, which serves two million passengers annually. Central Station is a public-private partnership with the City of Phoenix retaining ownership of the land and the development partners entering into a long-term ground lease for the project.  </div> <div> <br> </div> <div> Representatives from the City of Phoenix, including Councilwoman Ann O’Brien, along with members from the development and project teams, GMH Communities, CBRE Investment Management, Medistar Corporation, Layton Construction, and Multistudio attended the topping out to celebrate this important milestone.  </div> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/publictransitNews
Truth in Taxation Hearing Notice of Property Tax Increasehttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/budget-and-research/3110Budget & Research5/24/2024 3:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/3110/Phoenix City Hall.pngTruth in Taxation Hearing Notice of Property Tax Increase<div class="ExternalClass90890A8C2D23431CB2A2ED63C2A90F26"><html> <p> <strong>​Tax Notice Explained</strong> <strong> </strong> </p> <p>The accompanying Truth in Taxation notice is required by state law. The required notice addresses the city's primary property tax, which supports the General Fund services such as police and fire, parks and recreation, libraries and senior and community centers. </p> <p>The City of Phoenix's proposed primary property tax rate for 2024-25 of $1.2658 per $100 of assessed valuation is reduced from its 2023-24 rate of $1.2851 per $100 of assessed valuation. However, overall increases in assessed valuation result in a 2% increase in primary property taxes for the average City of Phoenix property owner. Individual experiences may differ based on unique property variances. </p> <p>State law requires the notice below any time the average primary property tax bill increases, even if the primary property tax rate is reduced.  </p> <p>The Truth in Taxation notice prescribed by state law does not address the City's secondary property tax. The City's secondary property tax rate for 2024-25 will be unchanged from its 2023-24 rate of $0.8141 per $100 of assessed valuation. Secondary property taxes pay the bonded debt service for facilities like libraries, police and fire stations, storm drains and parks. </p> <p>For more information, call 602-262-4800, or visit phoenix.gov/budget. </p> <p>Truth in Taxation notice publication dates and locations: </p> <p>The Record Reporter – May 24, 2024 and June 3, 2024. </p> <p>Additionally included in published estimates of revenues and expenses: </p> <p>The Record Reporter – June 10, 2024. </p> <p> <strong>Truth in Taxation Hearing Notice of Tax Increase</strong> <strong> </strong> </p> <p>In compliance with section 42-17107, Arizona Revised Statutes, the City of Phoenix is notifying its property taxpayers of the City of Phoenix's intention to raise its primary property taxes over last year's level.  The City of Phoenix is proposing an increase in primary property taxes of $4,177,285 or 2.00%. </p> <p>For example, the proposed tax increase will cause the City of Phoenix's primary property taxes on a $100,000 home to be $126.58 (total proposed taxes including the tax increase). Without the proposed tax increase, the total taxes that would be owed on a $100,000 home would have been $124.10. </p> <p>The proposed increase is exclusive of increased primary property taxes received from new construction. The increase is also exclusive of any changes that may occur from property tax levies for voter approved bonded indebtedness or budget and tax overrides. </p> <p>All interested citizens are invited to attend the public hearing on the tax increase that is scheduled to be held June 12, 2024, at 2:30 p.m. at the City of Phoenix Council Chambers, 200 W. Jefferson St​<span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">​</span></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/budgetNews
City of Phoenix Investments Increase Number of Sheltered Individuals, Decrease Unsheltered in Phoenix https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/homeless-solutions/3109Homeless Solutions5/22/2024 8:30:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/3109/Newsroom_OHS_009.pngCity of Phoenix Investments Increase Number of Sheltered Individuals, Decrease Unsheltered in Phoenix <div class="ExternalClassA35D87CDE4054B29B1AA049DA3A9F208"><html> <p>Today, the Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG) released <a target="_blank" href="https://azmag.gov/Portals/0/Homelessness/PIT-Count/2024/2024-PIT-Count-Report.pdf?ver=djMlOCF-KPo72ljiQxWHeg%3d%3d">data from its 2024 Point-in-Time (PIT) Homelessness Count</a>, showing a significant increase in the number of sheltered individuals in Phoenix and a significant decrease in the number of unsheltered individuals in the city. This positive change is a direct result of the City of Phoenix’s ongoing investment in creating new shelter beds and connecting people with services in Phoenix.  <br></p> <p>“This year’s Point-in-Time count demonstrates that the work we’ve done to expand shelter options is making a measurable difference,” Mayor Kate Gallego said. “Although the number of those living unsheltered in our community is still too high, and we certainly have more work to do to get people into permanent, stable housing, it’s reassuring to know that we are making steady progress getting residents off the streets and into safer situations.” <br></p><p> The Point-in-Time (PIT) Homeless Count is an annual street and shelter count that determines the number of people experiencing homelessness in Maricopa County during a given point in time, as part of a national effort to identify the extent of homelessness across the country. According to the 2024 PIT Count:  <br></p> <ul style="" class="" dir=""><li>The number of unsheltered individuals in Phoenix decreased by 19% from 3,333 people in 2023 to 2,701 in 2024.  </li><li>The number of people experiencing homelessness who are sheltered increased by 15% from 3,569 in 2023 to 4,115 in 2024.  </li><li>The total population of people experiencing homelessness in Phoenix decreased by just over 1% from 6,902 in 2023 to 6,816 in 2024. </li></ul> <p>“I am proud to see that the City’s investments in shelter are paying off for our community,” said Rachel Milne, Homeless Solutions Director. “While we know shelter alone does not solve homelessness, it is a crucial first step for many people to connect with the right resources and support to end their homelessness. Our commitment to addressing homelessness is stronger than ever. We will continue to collaborate with our community partners and invest in creating more shelter, housing and supportive services for those in need.” <br></p> <p>The City of Phoenix has prioritized creating more indoor shelter than ever before in the last several years, adding 592 new permanent beds in 2022 and 480 temporary beds in 2023. The City continues to build permanent solutions, with another 790 new beds planned for 2024 and 2025, including a 280-bed navigation center planned in West Phoenix.  <br></p> <p> <a target="_blank" href="/solutions">Learn more about the City’s efforts to address homelessness. ​</a> </p> <p> <a target="_blank" href="https://azmag.gov/Programs/Homelessness/Data/Point-In-Time-Homelessness-Count">Learn more about the PIT Count. </a></p><div><p><strong>WATCH</strong>: <a href="/newsroom/homeless-solutions/2994" target="_blank">Phoenix Point-In-Time Homelessness Count Completed​</a> </p><span style="font-size:10pt;"> </span></div> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/solutionsNews

 

 

Community and Economic DevelopmentPHXEconDevhttps://www.phoenix.gov/econdevCommunity and Economic DevelopmentcedCEDhttps://www.youtube.com/user/cityofphoenixazhttps://nextdoor.com/agency-detail/az/phoenix/city-of-phoenixPHXEcondevphoenixecondevTwitter

 ‭(Hidden)‬ Catalog-Item Reuse

 

 

​Share this page​