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How The City of Phoenix is Working to Address Homelessnesshttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/human-services/2266Human Services3/11/2022 8:30:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/2266/Newsroom_HSD_001.pngHow The City of Phoenix is Working to Address Homelessness<div class="ExternalClass6F88F586D29748A9A3BA2FA1DABCF0EC"><html>The Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG) released the <a href="https://azmag.gov/Portals/0/Homelessness/PIT-Count/2022/2022-2014_Unsheltered-Street-Count-by-Municipality.pdf?ver=BVaJMWAetqGlbxwUGnDTjw%3d%3d" target="_blank">data</a> today from its 2022 Point-in-Time (PIT) Homeless Count. The PIT Count is an annual street and shelter count to determine the number of people experiencing homelessness in Maricopa County during a given point in time, as part of a national effort to identify the extent of homelessness nationwide. The numbers reflect a two-year increase since the 2021 count was not conducted due to the COVID pandemic.<br><br>The pandemic strained economies worldwide. In our community, it resulted in the loss of jobs that hit low-wage earners particularly hard, putting them at greater risk of experiencing homelessness. Rising housing costs in the region also make more people vulnerable to homelessness. According to the PIT Homeless Count, the number of people experiencing homelessness within the City of Phoenix was 3,096. Due to the Covid-19 Crisis and the rise in housing and rental prices, the City of Phoenix anticipated an increase in homelessness and has taken steps to help mitigate the situation.<br><br>This fiscal year, the City dedicated nearly $50 million for homelessness solutions to provide shelters, rapid rehousing, outreach, and mental health services through partnerships with various community organizations and nonprofits.<br><br><strong style="text-decoration:underline;">Homelessness Solutions:</strong><br style="text-decoration:underline;"><br><strong>Shelters:</strong> $27.9 million.<br>A Sprung Structure is currently being constructed on the Human Services Campus (HSC) which will add 100 new beds and additional restrooms in the area. That project is expected to be complete in mid-March 2022. The City of Phoenix also funded 175 new beds at Central Arizona Shelter Services (CASS). Additional funding provides an emergency crisis shelter for families at Chicanos Por La Causa, a shelter for veterans with 145 rooms, an emergency shelter for vulnerable seniors as well as COVID-19 emergency shelters.<br><br><strong>Rapid Rehousing:</strong> $4.7 million.<br>The City of Phoenix contracted with community partners CASS, A New Leaf, Inc. & UMOM to provide COVID-19 Rapid Rehousing for families, single women & single men. The City also contracted with Community Bridges, Inc. (CBI) for Rapid Rehousing bridge support and Native American Connections (NAC) for Rapid Rehousing support for youth.<br><br><strong>Outreach Services:</strong> $8.3 million.<br>The City of Phoenix prioritizes leading with services when it comes to those experiencing homelessness and recognizes that there are unique populations that require specialized services to best meet their needs. The City provides outreach and engagement services for persons experiencing homelessness through contracts with various community partners. Services include veteran navigation & coordination services, navigation & wraparound services for justice-involved individuals, COVID-19 support for seniors experiencing homelessness, and COVID-19 related homelessness prevention. Community partners include CBI, HSC, Southwest Behavioral & Health Services (SWBH), Justa Center, U.S. Vets, Homeward Bound, and Phoenix Rescue Mission.<br><br><strong>Mental Health Services: </strong>$9 million.<br>The City of Phoenix has a tentative contract with Mercy Care, set to begin on or about April 2022, to provide mental health services for people experiencing homelessness.<br><br><strong style="text-decoration:underline;">Eviction Prevention:<br></strong><br style="text-decoration:underline;">Preventing the loss of housing through eviction prevention is a priority in the City of Phoenix. The U.S. Treasury has allocated 106 million dollars to the City of Phoenix for Emergency Rental Assistance to prevent residents from losing their homes. $51.1 million was allocated to begin ERA 1.0 on March 8, 2021. All ERA 1.0 program funds were disbursed as of January 2022. The Treasury allocated $55.3 million for ERA 2.0, the City began disbursement of those funds in October 2021. To date, $66,060,002 in rental assistance has been disbursed.<br><br>Additionally, through a partnership with <a href="https://clsaz.org/" target="_blank">Community Legal Services</a>, the city created the <a href="/humanservices/programs/landlord-tenant-counseling" target="_blank">Tenants Eviction Assistance Project (TEAP)</a>. TEAP provides no-cost legal assistance to residents experiencing an eviction crisis, including working cooperatively with local agencies administering COVID-19 related rental and utility assistance programs for the City of Phoenix, Maricopa County, and the state of Arizona.<br><br><strong style="text-decoration:underline;">Affordable Housing Initiatives:​​<br></strong><br>The City of Phoenix operates 1,567 public housing units, administers more than 7,000 Housing Choice Vouchers, and provides 1,200 housing units to seniors. The following are several of the City's major affordable housing initiatives:<br><br><strong>Housing Phoenix Plan: </strong>The Housing Phoenix plan was adopted by the Mayor & City Council in 2020 to continue to explore innovative and effective strategies to continue to provide critical affordable housing for the community. It set the goal of creating or preserving 50,000 homes by 2030. Through December 2021, 23,090 units have been created or preserved.<br><br><strong>New affordable housing creation:</strong> The City of Phoenix invested approximately $5.8 million to develop 126 new affordable single-family detached homes for low- and moderate-income homebuyers in South Phoenix Village (SPV).<br><br><strong>Landlord Incentive Program:</strong> The City of Phoenix provided $500,000 in incentives to landlords for accepting vouchers, with another $1 million in the pipeline. 570 landlords have received incentive payments for executing 1,297 Housing Assistance Payments (HAP) contracts. On Feb 16, 2022, City Council approved increasing the incentive payments to $2,000.<br><br><strong>Housing Rehabilitation Program:</strong> The City of Phoenix Invested nearly $2.5 million to preserve 164 affordable homes, with an average per-home investment of nearly $15,000 in 2021 alone.<br><br><strong>Down payment assistance:</strong> The City of Phoenix worked to support low-income, first-time homebuyers by selling 299 homes from the City of Phoenix public housing portfolio.<br><br><strong>HOME Investment Partnership Program:</strong> The City of Phoenix's distribution of HOME funds has been successful in delivering approximately 6,300 affordable housing units, with 1,200 underway today.<br><br>The City of Phoenix unifies community partners and resources to respond to neighborhoods and businesses impacted by homelessness with education and services. If you have questions or concerns about a homelessness issue in your neighborhood, you are encouraged to report it to PHX C.A.R.E.S. by calling 602-262-6251 or fill out a report <a href="https://phxatyourservice.dynamics365portals.us/phxcares/" target="_blank">here</a>.<br><br></html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/humanservicesNewshuman-servicesPHX C.A.R.E.S. team conducting outreach with people experiencing homelessnessHSHomelessness, Point in Time, Outreach, PHX C.A.R.E.S.Kristin Couturier602-568-8126602-534-5627kristin.couturier@phoenix.govPHXHumanService

 

 

Fire Ban in Desert Parks and Preserves Starts May 1https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/parks-and-recreation/3078Parks and Recreation4/19/2024 9:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/3078/Phoenix-Mountain-Preserve.jpgFire Ban in Desert Parks and Preserves Starts May 1<div class="ExternalClass85336C54B5D449EFBC16497AFE21DD2B"><html> <p>The Phoenix Parks and Recreation Department will put into effect its annual ban of open fires in the City's desert parks and mountain preserves starting Wednesday, May 1, 2024. The Maricopa County Parks and Recreation Department's annual fire ban goes into effect the same day .</p><p>In consultation with the Phoenix Fire Department, smoking and charcoal fires are included in the ban due to the extreme fire danger that the combination of low humidity, increased temperatures, excessive dry vegetation, and frequent high winds create each spring.</p><p>The ban applies to <strong>Camelback Mountain, Deem Hills Recreation Area, Lookout Mountain, Papago Park, Phoenix Mountains Park and Recreation Area, Phoenix Mountains Preserve, Phoenix Sonoran Preserve, North Mountain Park, Rio Salado Habitat Restoration Area, and South Mountain Park/Preserve.</strong></p><p>The ban does not apply to the City's flatland parks.</p><p>For those using the City's desert parks and preserve land, the fire ban stipulates the following:</p><p>·       Open wood and charcoal fires are prohibited</p><p>·       Propane or gas grills may be used, but only in established picnic areas</p><p><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><strong>The following activities continue to be prohibited year-round:</strong></span></p><ul style="" class="" dir=""><li>Smoking outside enclosed vehicles </li><li>Fireworks</li></ul><p>Motorists traveling through or near Phoenix's desert parks and mountain preserves should use extreme care with smoking materials and dispose of those only in their vehicle's ash tray.</p><p>To protect their homes, residents whose property borders the City's preserve land may remove dry shrubs, brush and grasses, and trim dead branches from trees within the 10-foot strip of land that borders their property. By creating this 10-foot "buffer zone" residents can help to protect their homes from potential brush fires in the adjacent preserve land.</p><p>Preserve neighbors also should check irrigation lines and pool back-flush hoses to ensure that water is not seeping into the preserve. Outside water sources encourage unnaturally dense vegetation growth, which increases fire risk.<br></p> </html></div>https://www.phoenix.gov/parksNews
​ City Exhibit Takes Aim at Sexual Assault Victim “Shaming" and “Blaming"https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/human-services/30794/19/2024 4:00:00 PMhttps://www.phoenix.gov/newssite/Lists/NewsArticle/Attachments/3079/library.jpg​ City Exhibit Takes Aim at Sexual Assault Victim “Shaming" and “Blaming"<div class="ExternalClass528E88C714FC416F97FA616B56521FCD"><html> <p>​<span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-size:10pt;">The City of Phoenix's Strategic Initiatives team invites you to visit a powerful exhibit to raise awareness about sexual assault as part of April's “Let's Talk Teal Campaign." April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and the city provides resources and awareness events all month.</span></p> <p>The exhibit titled “What were you wearing?" draws attention to the “rape culture," where questions and statements like these are common, and put the blame on the victim. Victim shaming and blaming discourages victims from coming forward to report the crime and seek help. The display features the stories of several survivors and a representation of the clothes they were wearing when they were assaulted. </p> <p>The exhibit is on display at Burton Barr Library on the 2nd floor through April 24th.</p> <p>The <a target="_blank" href="/humanservices/programs/strategicinitiatives">City of Phoenix's Strategic Initiatives</a> section collaborates with community partners to combat domestic violence, sexual assault, unhealthy youth relationships, human trafficking, and to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic. We achieve this mission through prevention, training, community awareness, and enhancing services for the overall well-being of those we serve .​<br></p> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>News
Operation Makeup Breakuphttps://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/police/3077Police4/19/2024 12:00:00 AMhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_2RWf2kCisOperation Makeup Breakup<div class="ExternalClassD2BFF659F0AD40889598610F676EACBE"><html> <p>The Phoenix Police Department recently made multiple arrests and recovered hundreds of thousands of dollars in stolen property in an organized retail theft investigation, Operation Makeup Breakup.</p> <p> <br>On Thursday, April 18, 2024, the Department and the Maricopa County Attorney’s Office provided statements to the public as well as video surveillance, body worn camera footage, and photographs highlighting the investigation and what was seized after executing multiple search warrants.<br><br>The six-month long investigation looked into an organized cosmetic retail fence; a fence being the individual or group who are purchasing stolen goods and reselling for a profit.<br><br>As a result of the investigation, three women were arrested and detectives were able to recover over 20,000 items, valued at over $560,000.<br><br>The fence was operating three “stores” out of homes in the Phoenix and Tonopah area. Rooms in these homes had been converted into the store fronts that people were invited in to purchase the cosmetics. These stores were not the only way the items were being sold, they were also being sold online and shipped, in some cases in bulk to other states and countries.<br><br>Over the course of the investigation, detectives learned that this fence had been operating for five years.<br><br>The fence purchased the stolen cosmetics from various boosters, individuals who steal or shoplift the goods to sell. Boosters are known to have a “shopping list” of items they know a fence will pay them for.<br><br>The suspects in this case are facing charges of Illegal Control of an Enterprise and Trafficking in Stolen Property.<br><br>“My hope is that this sends a strong message that we are committed to investigating and arresting individuals of all crimes, and theft of this magnitude will not be tolerated,” said Interim Police Chief Michael Sullivan.<br><br>These crimes are taken seriously by the department and the County Attorney’s Office.<br><br>“We need to pay particular attention to this kind of crime – especially when it’s at this scale – because it affects everyone’s bottom line,” said County Attorney Rachel Mitchell. “Retailers have to offset their losses which can mean those of us who are law-abiding citizens pay higher prices.”  <br><br>This is still an open investigation and details available for release are limited.  <br><br></p> </html></div>https://phoenix.gov/policeVideo

 

 

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